The hound of the baskerville Chapter 4

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The hound of the baskerville Chapter 4

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The hound of the baskerville Chapter 4

  1. 1. Chapter - 4 Sir Henry Baskerville
  2. 2. Summary Sir Henry arrives and tells Holmes that he has something of his own mystery. Someone has sent him a letter at his hotel, with pasted printed words that say: "As you value your life or your reason keep away from the moor." Only the word "moor" has been hand-written. No one knew what hotel Sir Henry would go to, so he is quite puzzled. Holmes believes the document has been pasted together from the previous day's newspaper and he finds the article which has been used. He knew where to look because of the typescript used. He also knows that the words have been cut out using nail scissors.
  3. 3. Holmes deduces that the person who composed this letter was educated, but wished to pose as an uneducated man. He also believes that the man's handwriting might be known to Sir Henry, or might come to be known by him. Also, he notes that the composer of the letter was in a hurry, and probably feared an interruption. Holmes asks Sir Henry if anything else of interest has happened to him. Dr. Mortimer tells his story and Sir Henry is quite interested, saying that he had heard the tale before, but never took it seriously. Holmes thinks there is some danger at Baskerville Hall, and Sir Henry, with a fiery temper, declares that there is "no man upon earth who can prevent me from going to the home of my own people." Sir Henry tells Holmes to come to lunch with him in a few hours, so that he can think the whole matter over.
  4. 4. Holmes doesn't know who the man is, but he knows that he is clever. Holmes though notes that the man has put himself at a disadvantage: Holmes has noted the cab number. However, he claims that it makes no difference. Instead, he believes he should have followed the cab and seen where the man went to. He regrets though, that they have been too eager and scared the man off. As soon as Sir Henry and Dr. Mortimer leave, Holmes turns into a man of action. With Watson, he follows them. He then spots the man who is following Sir Henry and Dr. Mortimer in a hansom cab. Watson sees a bushy black beard and a pair of piercing eyes. The cab then rushes off. Holmes dashes into the stream of traffic to try to get another cab, to no avail. Holmes complains about their bad luck.
  5. 5. Sir Henry asks "Why in thunder should anyone follow or watch me?" He then goes on to say that he has misplaced one of his boots. They were brand new and he had put them out the night before so that they would be varnished. Sir Henry therefore had to go shopping that morning. He then declares that Holmes and Dr. Mortimer must tell him what is going on. Another thing to note about this section is that Holmes immediately recognizes that his opponent is clever. For the story to be interesting, the pursued person (here, the man in the cab) must be a match for Holmes. This is significant because it shows how the narrative and its mysteries are produced by the matched wits of Holmes and his opponent.
  6. 6. Analysis This section is about the production and observation of clues. How does Holmes know something is a clue? How does he find more clues? Here, we see how Holmes uses an understanding of types -- a classification system to explain the meaning of a particular clue. First, we see how he is familiar with "typescripts" -- he can identify to what medium a particular clipping belongs based off of this type. He then follows the trail to assume the type of person who would read this kind of newspaper. Second, he asks if anything out of the ordinary has happened to Sir Henry upon his arrival? While Dr. Mortimer thinks Henry's missing boot is trivial, Holmes does not pass judgment on it. This shows us that Holmes' investigation method needs to take place by a comparison of the ordinary to the unusual -- in other words, the usual type is compared to a specific instance. In other words, Holmes' method is revealed to use classifications, and to compare specifics to such classes. This is significant because it would have been in line with scientific theories of the day, which tried to classify various animal and plant species according to their types. In this way, understanding the class to which something belongs can help Holmes understand more about a particular entity. However, at the same time, understanding how something differs from a class also is capable of producing clues, and explaining the relation of clues to each other.
  7. 7. In this section, Holmes jumps into action and immediately finds a trail. He does not know where the trail will lead him, but he is interested in following it. Significantly, this tells us about another one of his methods. Not only is he supposed to observe details which are remnants of past events, but he is dealing with a mystery that is very much alive. In this way, his decisions matter for producing more evidence. In other words, investigation is not only a retrospective process, but an active method where decisions matter. However, Holmes here regrets his decision of looking over-eager -- now the man in the cab knows that they are on his trail. Thus the active trail must be treated with care if it is to lead to more evidence. Another thing to note about this section is that Holmes immediately recognizes that his opponent is clever. For the story to be interesting, the pursued person (here, the man in the cab) must be a match for Holmes. This is significant because it shows how the narrative and its mysteries are produced by the matched wits of Holmes and his opponent.
  8. 8. STUDY QUESTIONS • The letters of the note warning to Sir Henry were cut from which newspaper?  Times • The cabman reported to Holmes that his passenger’s name was:  Sherlock Holmes • Why was Sir Charles Baskerville was murdered?  because Dr Mortimer believe that he died by natural causes. • Why Sir Charles walked to the gate in Yew Alley, but then ran to the end of the Alley?  because there was a change in his footprints from the whole foot to the toe. • Why He had stood at the gate in Yew Alley for some minutes?  because there was his cigar ash on the ground by the gate. • Why He was expecting to meet someone at the moor gate.  because we don't know if this is true or not yet. • Why There was a large dog in the Alley that night?  because there were his footprints around the death body of Sir Charles.
  9. 9. • Which word in the letter Sir Henry received was handwritten?  Moors • Henry Baskerville received a note at the Northumberland Hotel. What was the message?  "As you value your life or your reason keep away from the moor.“ • What did Holmes induce from the message?  The writer was an educated man trying to look like an uneducated one. He was trying to conceal his handwriting because it may be known to Henry. He was writing at a hotel because the ink was spluttering. • What had Henry lost at the hotel?  A boot • Why did Holmes follow Henry Baskerville and Dr. Mortimer?  He was trying to see who the man was that wrote the letter by seeing if anyone was following them. • Who did Holmes see in the cab on Regent St.? Describe the person.  A man with a bushy black beard and piercing eyes, looked at the men thenyelled at the driver.
  10. 10. • What did Holmes deduce from the message? a) The letter was composed by an educated person who wished to pose as an uneducated one. b) The writing might be known or come to be known to Henry. The composer of the message was c) in a hurry so as not to be interrupted or discovered. The address had been written in a hotel. • What had Henry lost at the hotel?  A boot had been misplaced or stolen. • Why did Holmes follow Henry Baskerville and Dr. Mortimer?  He wanted to find out if they were being followed. • Who did Holmes see in the cab on Regent Street?  He saw a man with a bushy black beard and piercing eyes apparently following Sir Henry and Dr. Mortimer. • Why did Holmes send a telegraph to Barrymore?  He wanted to verify that Barrymore was indeed at Baskerville Hall and not in London. It would prove that Barrymore was not the spy.
  11. 11.  Henry Baskerville received a note at the Northumberland Hotel. What was the message? a) "I have information you want. Leave a 20 pound note at the end of the alley in a brown sack, and I will leave a letter with the information." b) "As you value your life or your reason keep away from the moor.“ Ans. c) "Remove Holmes from the case or you will both die." d) "The hound is ready to strike again--beware."  Which of the following was not one of the deductions that Holmes made about the message? a) a. The letter was composed by an uneducated person who wished to pose as an educated one. Ans. b) The writing might be known to Henry. c) The composer of the message was in a hurry so as not to be interrupted or discovered. d) The address had been written in a hotel.  What had Henry lost at the hotel? a) He had lost his wallet. b) He had lost his diary. c) He had lost a boot. Ans. d) He had lost his walking stick.
  12. 12.  True or False" Holmes followed Henry Baskerville and Dr. Mortimer because he wanted to see if they were being followed. a) True b) False  Who did Holmes see in the cab on Regent Street (who was apparently following Sir Henry and Mortimer)? a) He saw a man with a bushy black beard and piercing eyes. b) He saw the town's veterinarian. c) He saw a friend of Henry's. d) He saw a woman who had a large dog on a leash in the cab with her.

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