2012 National Service Coordinators Conference - senior housing - HAC

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HAC staffer Eric Oberdorfer delivered this presentation at the 2012 National Service Coordinators Conference on September 9-12 in Washington, DC

HAC staffer Eric Oberdorfer delivered this presentation at the 2012 National Service Coordinators Conference on September 9-12 in Washington, DC

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  • 2 part presentation: 1st part: senior demographics, economic conditions and housing conditions across Rural America2nd part senior housing issues and trendsTry to break it up half way through with a question and answer session – depends upon times
  • We work as an intermediary between rural housing providers across the country in the field and the federal governmentWe have a loan fund division, training and technical assistance division as well as a research and information divisionI work in the R&I division and our main goal is to obtain national data and information and disseminate to our partner organizations
  • All data, unless otherwise noted, comes from 2006-2010 American Community Survey We do not rely solely on “rural” or “nonmetro” census tracts, but rather areas defined by HAC as “rural and small town”Though we are a rural organization, rural can be hard to define. As such, we base our definition off proximities to exurban/suburban/urban areas, community size, population, population density, and various social and economic factors.This definition better reflects the parts of the country we work within, and is represented on the map in light green and green.
  • To begin we’ll start with some data on specific demographics that will show what some specific senior characteristics are in rural and small town areas and how they differ from the rest of the country.
  • The chart highlights the percentage of population over the age of 65 in different regions throughout the U.S.Looking at this we can see that rural and small town areas have a more significant seniors population than either suburban and exurban areas and urban areasThis higher percentage of individuals over the age of 65 has direct impacts on rural housing
  • Furthermore, we can see that although rural and small town areas account for just 21 percent of the total population, 24.6 percent of all seniors live thereinRural and small town areas may have the smallest percentage of the population over all, however it is clear that this population is older than other areas.The majority of seniors live in suburban and exurban areas, however those places do not have a senior population that is as high per capita as either urban or rural and small town areas This is a reflection on the fact that most Americans, especially families without members over 65, live in suburban and exurban areas overall
  • We can tell from this map that shows the percentage of individuals over 65 in each county in the United States, that the oldest counties match up to the map showing rural and small town regions. In fact, 21 out of 25 of the oldest counties within the US are in rural regions. The other 4 are in FloridaThe main, outlier is Florida, which is very old but predominantly suburban/exurban. This is due to the high numbers of seniors who chose to retire in Florida. Although there is an assumption that many seniors will retire to more peaceful, rural regions that have almost resort-like amenities this population is not as prevalent as one would assume. Moreover, this population are typically younger seniors (60-70) who often move closer to their families after a major life change (ie injury or loss of a spouse). Before we move to the next slide, make a note of the high percentages of seniors in the Great Plains states (the Dakotas, Nebraska and Kansas as well as Montana, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and Northern Maine
  • These areas, as we can see from this population map, are predominately growing older due to population loss, as opposed to lopsided growthThis is largely attributed to a phenomenon known as “rural brain drain” As our country has urbanized and agriculture has grown increasingly mechanized, rural areas that relied on this before are losing employment opportunities for younger citizens As a result, many individuals will move away for college and then move to more urbanized areas where this is, typically, increased job opportunity than rural and small town regions – those who stay are typically lower skilled workersAs younger generations leave, these areas grow older
  • Tofuther illustrate this point, we can see that the median age in rural and small town regions is 40 as opposed to 37 across the nation.Furthermore the age gap has increased over the years showing that not only do rural and small town areas have high percentages of seniors, but rural and small town regions are aging faster than the nation overall
  • We can see in this map, again, the oldest areas and those with the most significant population losses have the highest median ages.Looking at the regions with highest population losses, predominantly range from 45.8 to as high as 63.6Again with the exception of Florida
  • Although rural and small town regions have higher percentages of seniors, their ages remain relatively consistent across the country.Those 85 and older, consider the oldest of the old, typically have far more health and mobility issues than their younger senior counterpartsThis portion of seniors accounts for the smallest population overall with seniors aged 65-75 making up the largest groupIn the near future more individuals will beyond 85 than ever before – as the Baby Boomers reach 85 in 40 years or so the oldest number of adults is expected to grow even faster than the grow of older adults between the ages of 65-75A telling indicator of the growth in the senior population that will be seen as the Baby Boomers turn 65 can be seen with the high percentages of “near seniors” or those 60-64.Although only accounting for 5 years, as opposed to 10 like the other groups, the account for about a quarter of the senior populationPartially, this is due to their younger age and better health overall, but even taking that into account, we are at the beginnings of a significant increase in 65 over the next 20 years. According to the US Census Bureau, the number of seniors is expected to rise by 30 million over the next 20 years, This is a staggering increase of 35 percent- jumping from 13 percent of the population to 20 percent! Moreover seniors 85 and older will grow from 5.8 million in 2010 to 19 million (more or less) by 2050!
  • This can be see looking at this chart. We can see a clear bump of individuals aged 45 to 60 that make up the Baby boomer generationAs they age, of course, these numbers will taper off, however no other generation has ever seen population sizes so large entering the cusp of senior-status Also interesting to note is the bump seen from the ages of 10 to 24 and the rapid decrease from ages 25 to 35. This can be explained, again through the rural brain drain phenomenon – as individuals enter their careers, they are often required to leave rural and small town regions for increased opportunities elsewhere As the years progress it will be interesting to see if these individuals move back to where they grew up, or if the rural population will continue shrinking at substantial ratesTake notice of the imbalance at the top of the chart as well – where we can clearly see a significantly higher female population than male population This is predominantly due to longevity – just over 80 years for women compared to 75 for men
  • In fact, as a result of longevity, senior females make up a significantly higher proportion of those living alone than men, both in rural and small town areas and the nation overallIn fact, it is more pronounced across the country where 71.8 percent of seniors living alone are females compared to 67.8 percent of seniors living alone in rural and small towns
  • Lastly, minorities make up a significantly smaller proportion of the senior population in rural and small town areas than they do in nation overallOnly 11.3 percent of the senior population in rural and small town regions are minorities compared to 21 percent of the national senior populationThis should change as the senior population expands in the coming yearsBaby Boomers are a typically more diverse generation than the one that preceded them which will be reflected as the turn 65.This will effect rural and small town regions which will see significant increases in Latino seniors who live therein. For the purposes of this report, minorities refer to any individual who is anything other than white, non-Latino, including individuals with 2 or more races based upon ACS definitions
  • Although the cost of living is typically less in rural and small town areas (with some exceptions), median incomes are typically lowerThis is true for seniorsWithin the US – the median annual income is about 52K, however this drops to 34K for seniors and only 28K for rural and small town seniorsAs seniors are retired, or unable to work incomes are more limited – this is especially true for seniors who fall in the lower income quintilesOver 80 percent of income for seniors that fall in the bottom two income quintiles comes from Social SecuritySeniors often live on very fixed incomes with little wiggle room for additional and unexpected expenses
  • Fewer seniors fall under the poverty line that the national population overall13.8 percent of the national population falls under the poverty line compared to just 9.8 percent of seniorsSlightly more rural and small town seniors experience poverty than seniors nationally at almost 11 percentFemales experience more poverty than men – 13.8 percent of females in rural and small town regions experience poverty compared to 7.9 percent of menThis is most likely due to the fact that a much greater percentage of elderly females live alone than men
  • Minority seniors also experience significantly more poverty than white, non-Hispanic seniorsThis is most pronounced for rural African-American seniors at 28.4 percent in rural and small townsAlthough African-American seniors experience the highest rates of poverty in rural and small towns, Hispanic seniors, American Indian seniors and Asian seniors all have higher poverty rates that white non Hispanic seniors. Each group listed experiences more poverty in rural and small town regions than nationally with the exception of Asian Americans Regions with higher percentages of minority seniors typically experience more poverty than elsewhere
  • What is striking is that though only 11.3 percent of the rural senior and small town population is comprised of minorities, the account for 20 percent of rural and small seniors experiencing poverty which is quite an overrepresentationThis shows that poverty effects rural and small town minority seniors significantly more so than non-minority seniors.
  • In this map we can see the regions with the highest amounts of seniors in povertyThere are certain regions within this map that call for increased observation5 regions experiencing high poverty jump out – The colonias, the Lower Mississippi Delta, the Southern Black Belt, Native American Lands and AppalachiaIt should be noted that 4 out of 5 of those regions have high concentrations of minority individuals
  • This shows areas with high minority senior populationsAgain – this map lines up quite well with the poverty map we just sawHere are native American lands, here is the Lower Missippi Delta, The Colonias, and the Black Belt The only region that does not show up on this map but showed up on the last map is Appalachia, which is predominantly white
  • An overwhelming majority of rural seniors own their own homesThis number at 88.8 percent is significant greater than seniors nationallyThis is most likely related to the fact that most residents of rural and small town regions own as opposed to rent – there are fewer rental opportunities and less housing options
  • Furthermore, most seniors in rural and small town regions own their homes outright and no longer make mortgage paymentsIn fact, more seniors in rural and small town regions have paid off their mortgages in full than the seniors nationally
  • This graph shows that, logically, as rural and small town homeowners get older, fewer and fewer are left with mortgages. There is a significant drop between the years 64 to 75 where an seniors without mortgages increase by 30%
  • Fewer rural and small town seniors are cost burdened than seniors nationallyCost burdened refers individuals who pay 35 percent of more of their gross income on rent28.2 percent of seniors in rural and small town areas are cost burdended compared to the seniors nationally
  • However, whether a senior rents or owns their home has a significant impact on their economic wellbeingAlthough 19.7 percent of seniors who own their homes are cost burdened in rural and small town regions, 30.3 of senior renters are cost burdenedThis number is even more pronounced nationally where 44.6 percent of senior renters are cost burdened compared to 22.8 percent of senior homeowners nationally.According to the American Community Housing Survey, housing cost burden increases as residents grow olderOver the next decade, as hundreds of thousands of government subsidized rental units are reaching the end of their affordability periods and may potentially shift to market rate rental programs
  • Rural and small town seniors have typically lived in the housing unit for a longer period of time than rural or small town rentersMost senior homeowners, on the other hand have lived in their housing unit from 1999 or earlier The majority of senior renters typically moved into their units in the year 2000 or later – very renters have lived in their units from 1979 or beforeThis most likely the result of seniors moving from homes that they own in to smaller, more manageable rental units as they age
  • The majority of senior homeowners live in housing structures with just one unit whereas the majority of senior renters live in housing structures with two or more unitsThis consistent both nationally and in rural and small town America A slightly higher percentage of rural and small town homeowners live in mobile homes, rvs, boats and so on than the nation as a whole at 10.4 and 7.7 percent respectivelyThe same is true for rural and small town senior renters at 5.3 and 3.7 percent respectively
  • Based upon data from the American Housing Survey (which relies solely upon metro and nonmetro data – so slightly different from HAC’s defintion of rural and small town), nonmetro seniors own significantly larger lots than metro seniorsThis not necessarily surprising, as the spread-out low density nature of rural regions provides for more affordable space than in citiesThe average lot size for a nonmetro senior was 44,000 square feet compared to just 14,000 square feet in metro regions. As rural and small town seniors age, maintaining and managing properties of this size becomes increasingly difficult, placing greater strain on a senior’s housing circumstance.
  • Senior households in rural areas are also at a disadvantage due to the spread-out nature of rural regionsDriving often becomes increasingly difficult and dangerous as we age and 12.5 percent of senior households do not have access to vehiclesHaving transportation options for seniors is critical to access medical services, grocery stores, and other daily amenitiesUnfortunately there are often limited transportation options available in rural areas and most roads in rural regions lack sidewalks, and services and amenities are too far to walk to. Specialized transit services for the elderly and persons with disabilities do exist under the US DoT Section 5310 program, however these services are not available in all areas.
  • Talk about moving along the housing continuum from most independent to most dependent
  • Older adults remaining in their homes as long as possibleOverwhelmingly this is what seniors prefer and allows to live also living as independently as possiblePromotes successful aging by allow seniors to be as functional as they can possibly for as long as they possibly can without placing them at risk for a major injuryAccessibilty – being able to function within the homeUpkeep- esp in rural and small town seniors households with large lotsChoice – little rental options and options to downgrade housing sizeTransporation – many seniors don’t have access to cars
  • Universal design – ensures products and environments are appropriate for all people including those with physical, cognitive, or sensory imparimentsExamples include:Blended step-free entrance routesMultiple countertop heightsWide doorwayLever faucetsCurbless showers with handheld adjustable shower headhome rehabilitation and repair loan/grant program Section 504 funding (USDA) small grants for rehabilitation and home repair- fortunately has not seen significant funding cuts. Must be over 62 to receive grantsHOMES BUILT IN THIS WAY DO NOT HAVE TO WORRY about expensive upgrades and modifications as residents get olderSome states and localities have developed voluntary programs to encourage developers or homeowners to adopt universal design features including financial incentives, building certifications, streamlined permitting or fee waiversCalifornia’s Health and Safety Code that allows developers to provide add-on options for potential homebuyers enabling buyers to choose accesible features for their homes Georgia’s tax-credit program that provides 500 bucks for people to disabilities to cover costs of no step entrances
  • Federal Funding for new congregate housing programs no longer exists (since 1995) but existing contracts have been continuously renewed
  • ASSISTED LIVINGAbout 1 million individuals (or 5% of seniors) live in assisted care facilities – this expected to double by 2030 – though the economic turndown has slowed this202Open to any low-income household comprised of at least one individual age 62 or olderIn 2010 there were 262,704 housing units in the section 202 program Average waiting list 13 months with an average vacancy rate of 2.6 – VERY POPULAR PROGRAMThis is a big deal as a Congressionally mandated report – “Commission on Affordable Housing and Health Facility Needs for Seniors in the 21st Century” found approximately 730,000 new units will be needed by 2020 to address the housing needs of low income seniors
  • Costs have increased about 6.5% year over year since 2004. Different reports come to different numbers too, one mention 3,280 a monthOnly seniors with large disposable incomes are able to afford assisted livingMedicare does not cover seniors entering these faciltiesHowever states can make use of Medicaid 1015 © waivers – Home and Community Based Waivers – that allowed states to provide long-term care services in home and community based facilities as opposed to institutional settingsWaivers help pay for case management, homemakes, home health aids, personal care, adultn day services, habilitation and respite care202 Funding has declined significantly over the last decade – between FY95 and FY00 by 35% - declined through most of the 2000s but rose at the end of the decade with FY10 slightly higher than FY00 – however funding has been slashed since then 688.1 million in FY10 to 375 in FY12

Transcript

  • 1. HAC Rural Seniors and Their Homes:Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 2. HAC www.ruralhome.org The mission of the Housing Assistance Council is to improve housing conditions for the rural poor, with an emphasis on the poorest of the poor in the most rural places.American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 3. Rural and Small Town Census Tracts HAC American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 4. HAC demographic characteristicsAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 5. Population Age 65 or Over 14.0% HAC 13.7% 13.5% 13.0%Percent of the Population 12.8% 12.7% 12.5% 12.0% 11.9% 11.5% 11.0% U.S. Rural & Small Town Suburban & Exurban Urban U.S. Rural & Small Town Suburban & Exurban Urban Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 6. HAC Where do Seniors Live?Population by Residence, 2010 Senior Population by Residence, 2010 Rural and Rural and Small Small Town, 21.0% Town, 24.6% Urban, 29.9% Urban, 30.3% Suburban Suburban and and Exurban, 49.1 Exurban, 44.9 % % Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 7. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 8. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 9. HAC Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 10. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 11. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 12. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 13. Race and Ethnicity, Age 65+ HAC United States Rural & Small Town Minority, 11.3% Minority, 21.0% White not White not Hispanic, 79.0% Hispanic, 88.7% Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 14. HAC economic characteristicsAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 15. Median Income by Senior Status and Residence, 2009 HAC $60,000 $51,869 $50,000 $40,000 $33,906Median Income $28,412 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $0 U.S. U.S. Seniors Rural & Small Town Seniors Source: American Housing Survey, 2009 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 16. Senior Poverty By Residence & Gender HAC 16% 13.8% 14% 11.8% 12% 10.9% 9.8% 10%Percent in Poverty 7.9% 8% 7.2% 6% 4% 2% 0% U.S. Rural & Small Town All Elderly Elderly Male Elderly Female Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 17. Poverty Rates of Seniors HAC Hispanic 18.9% 21% White, non Hispanic 7.5% 9.4% American Indian 19.6% US 23.6% Rural & Small Town Asian 12.6% 10% African-American 19.9% 28.4% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 18. Percent of Seniors in Poverty, Rural & Small Town HAC 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% White, non- 88.7% 80% 50% Hispanic 40% Minority Status 30% 20% 10% 20% 0% 11.3% Overall In Poverty Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 19. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 20. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 21. HAC housing characteristicsAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 22. Housing Tenure, Persons Aged 65 and Over HAC 100% 11.2% 21.2% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% Renter Occupied 88.8% 78.8% Owner Occupied 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Rural & Small Town US Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 23. Owned Households with Mortgages, Persons 65 and Over HAC100%90%80%70% 71.7% 67.5%60%50% Without Mortgage With Mortgage40%30%20% 28.2% 32.5%10% 0% Rural US Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 24. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 25. Cost-Burdened Seniors HAC40%35% 34.7%30% 28.2%25%20% % of seniors that spent 35% or more of gross income on rent15%10%5%0% Rural & Small Town US American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 26. Cost-Burdened Households, Persons Aged 65 and Over HAC50%45% 44.6%40%35%30% 30.3% % of renters that spent 35% or more of gross income25% on rent % of homeowners that spend 35% or more of gross income on owner costs20% 22.8% 19.7%15%10%5%0% Rural & Small Town US Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 27. Year Moved into Unit, Persons Aged 65 and Over HAC70%60%50%40% Rural & Small Town Renter Rural & Small Town Owner30%20%10%0% 2000 or later 1999-1980 1979-or earlier Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 28. HAC Tenure by Units in Structure, Persons Aged 65 and Over Owner Rental100% 100%90% 90%80% 80%70% 70%60% 60% Mobile Home, RV, Boat, Etc50% 50% Two or More Units40% 40% One Unit30% 30%20% 20%10% 10% 0% 0% Rural & Small Town US Rural & Small Town US Source: ACS Data, 2006-2010 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 29. Lot Size, Age 65+ HAC 50,000 45,000 40,000 35,000Square feet 30,000 25,000 Nonmetro 20,000 Metro 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 Lot Size Source: American Housing Survey Data, 2009 American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 30. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 31. HACfederally assisted housing programs American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 32. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 33. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 34. HACAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 35. HAChousing options, issues, and trends American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 36. HACAging in Place• Older adults remaining in their homes for as long as possible• Independent living for seniors promotes successful aging by: – Improving health – Life satisfaction – Self-esteem• Challenges include: – Accessibility – Upkeep – Choice in housing typologies – Housing affordability – Transportation options American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 37. HACHousing Needs and Options• Home modifications and retrofits – Simple modifications – Installing ramps, chairlifts, and stair-glides – Widen doorways – Roll-in showers – Lowered countertops• Universal design American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 38. HACSenior Share Homes• Brings together older home providers and seniors seeking a place to live• Affordable group homes• Benefits: • Monthly Charge includes: – Independence - Rent - Housing expenses – Household help - Food – Transportation – Safety – Companionship – Peace of mind American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 39. HAC Supportive Housing• An umbrella term for residential settings that have been specifically developed to provide an array of onsite services: – Section 202 Housing • Provides federal subsidized supportive housing for older adults – Assisted Living Residences • Provides private rooms or apartments for older adults and offers a level of care that can range from light hospitality servicers to care provided by nursing facilities – Adult Foster Care Homes • Provides services similar to assisted living residences but in smaller facilities, including single-family homes – Continuing Care Retirement Communities • Provides several housing models on-site, enabling residents to transition through the senior housing continuum while remaining in the same development – Congregate Housing • Provides apartment homes for seniors who want to live independently but want hospitality-style services, like light housekeeping American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 40. HACSupportive Housing Challenges• Meeting the demand for supportive housing – Increased demands on housing as Baby Boomers age – The Assisted Living Conversion Program • provides funds for owners of Section 202 housing to convert some or all of their units into state-licensed assisted living residences • Started in 2000 • Program’s reach limited – Funding not large enough to enable wide-spread funding – Even if all existing subsidized developments were retrofitted,the current supply would still fall short of the growing demand American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 41. HACSupportive Housing Challenges• Providing affordable services – Affordability determined by both cost of housing and cost of services – In 2009, the annual nationwide cost for a private 1-bedroom unit in an assisted living facility averaged $33,903, or more than $2,800 a month • Costs drive many low- to moderate-income older adults to prematurely enter institutional care, where Medicaid covers costs to those who qualify – Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services waiver program • Some states provide funding to cover the costs of supportive services for Medicaid-eligible adults in state-licensed supportive housing • Even with increases in recent years, share of residents in supportive housing receiving waivers is small• Continued federal and state funding American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 42. HACTrends• Significant increases to the elderly population in the coming years – Baby boomers turning 65 – Senior population is expected to grow to over 30 million by 2030 • Senior population account for 20 percent of the population then compared to just 13 percent today• Rapidly aging population will have significant impacts on current elderly housing stock – Increased need for housing upgrades and rehabilitation – Increased housing cost-burdened caused by the Great Recession and foreclosure crisis – Increasingly diverse elderly population American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 43. HAC ConclusionAmerican Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America
  • 44. HAC 2012 National Rural Housing ConferencePromises to Keep in Challenging Times REGISTER NOW AT: www.ruralhome.org American Association of Service Providers Conference; September 12th, 2012; Washington, DC Rural Seniors and Their Homes: Senior Housing Trends and Conditions across Rural America