Social+media+in+the+2011+victorian+floods

871 views
815 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
871
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Social+media+in+the+2011+victorian+floods

  1. 1.       Social Media in the 2011 Victorian Floods    June 2011        Sponsored by:                   
  2. 2. Contents 1.  Executive Summary ..................................................................................................1Executive Summary Continued... ..................................................................................2Executive Summary Continued... ..................................................................................32.  Background to the Floods ........................................................................................43.  Background to the Review of the Use of Social Media in Flood Events ..................54.  Objectives of the Review..........................................................................................65.  Methodology ............................................................................................................7 5.1 Methodology Summarised ......................................................................................................7 5.2 Detailed Methodology............................................................................................................76.  Classification of comments ....................................................................................10 6.1 Some Examples of Comments from Different Sorts of Message Spreaders..........................117.  Profile of the Event from SES Information Releases ..............................................12 7.1 SES Message Out .................................................................................................................12 7.2 The Response to the Floods in Social Media .......................................................................138.  Nature of the Commentary ....................................................................................15 8.1 Examples of Personal Comments.........................................................................................16 8.2 Content of Commentary .......................................................................................................18 8.3 What’s Missing.....................................................................................................................21 8.4 Victoria Police Tweeting......................................................................................................229.  Learnings for Future Social Media Monitoring ......................................................25 9.1 Some Guides for Monitoring ................................................................................................25 9.2 Detailed Content Analysis....................................................................................................2510.  Conclusions...........................................................................................................27 10.1 Communications Models ......................................................................................................2811.  Suggestions for Future Work................................................................................30Appendix 1: Locations Covered...................................................................................31Appendix 2: List Of Top Social Media Accounts..........................................................32Appendix 3: Sample Of Community Facebook Pages (Public Pages)..........................35   
  3. 3. 1. Executive Summary Introduction This report analyses social media commentary about the Victorian floods from 10 January to 4 March 2011.    In this period there were two floods – one in rural Victoria (January) and one in Melbourne and surrounds (February).  Objectives Wide ranging objectives were established for the review:   • Document social media mentions during Victorian Floods   • Analyse comment by location and other characteristics   • Ascertain the nature of comments   • Establish flows of information   • Establish the nature of sharing of warnings and other information   • Explore the database for other useful insights   • Recommend approaches for future events    Methodology Social media comment for the period 10 January to 4 March 2011 was collated using social media monitoring provider Buzz Numbers, and Twitter and Facebook feeds from Rowfeeder.com.  The data was then analysed by Alliance Strategic Research.  Data was cleaned from over 320,000 comments to those relevant to the Victorian Floods with an end number of 12,405 comments analysed.  Comments were classified in a way to understand the nature of the comment. The classification was:   ‐ People in the Floods ‐ Official Posts  ‐ News ‐ Message Spreaders ‐ Warnings ‐ Spectators/Commentary   ‐ Message Spreaders ‐ Relief/Donations ‐ Message Spreaders ‐ News (story about floods) ‐ Message Spreaders ‐ News (story not about floods)  ‐ Message Spreaders ‐ Information ‐ Recovery/Post‐flood issues    ‐ Social media    ‐ Commentary ‐ not directly about floods (but including reference to  floods)    1 
  4. 4.  Executive Summary Continued... Key Findings  • Social media has been used  to comment about the Victorian  floods – much  of it stemming from news sources   • Data captured for this analysis possibly represents a fraction of the total  commentary.  The data collated is entirely dependent on key terms and unless  these are used, the comment is not captured  • During the floods SES information releases strongly focused on warnings   • Different social media channels have been used for different types of  communications and at different times in the events  • Social media comment and Twitter in particular has the capacity to be highly  reactive, and possibly even “ahead of the news”   • Comment via Twitter was most frequent.  News services also use Twitter to  promote stories.  • There is evident willingness to spread information about crisis events –  including fundraising  • Well wishers and ‘spectators’ also have a reasonably high profile in the  commentary   • Commentary drops away quickly after the events.  Recovery and community  commentary declines also  • Although news commentary drops away after the event, this source persists  for longest  • Commentary in metropolitan areas was more personal, and there was a lot  more volume in a short period of time   • Discussion of recovery issues as a share of comment increases after the event,  but is at low levels overall  • Specific locations get mentioned frequently, larger centres more so than  smaller. The duration of inundation will also impact the comment for specific  areas   • The nature of the comment is generally helpful and positive in its nature.  The  ironic or cynical comment evident in many other topics in social media is not  evident in the comment about floods   • As the crisis is occurring there is commentary, as it abates so to does all  comment   • Each and every event is likely to have a different profile   • The communications task will become more complex as one too many  broadcasts fracture to become one to one message spreading, not only  through known sources but individual to individual     2 
  5. 5.  Executive Summary Continued... Suggestions for future work  • Successfully monitoring future events in social media requires comprehensive  data collation as the events unfold    – Established relationship with a social media tracking software provider  is the most time effective way to collate information  – Understanding the limitations of data tracks is important   – Key terms need to be identified early and modified as needed  – Key publishers established and followed  – A human resource required to monitor and modify  – Establishing hash tags early and monitoring if they change is essential  to track activity  • Pre establishing tracking terms for categories of events (fire, flood) and  setting them up in a monitoring services ahead of events occurring will  facilitate start‐up of monitoring as the event breaks.  – Detailed analysis content analysis is painstaking, so planning for that  analysis is also recommended  – This will include planning of key words to be tracked and specific  research questions  • Consider using SM aggregation tools for publication back into the SM stream  – Eg. Paper.li  • Many mobile phones are SM enabled (Facebook and Twitter) and may be the  last way people in a disaster have to communicate (as demonstrated after  Yasi).  As dependence on mobile technology increases the need to respond is  likely to grow  • Apart from disaster communication there appears to be considerable scope to  tap the willingness of people to help and contribute.  Some targeted recovery  promotion and activity may fall on fertile ground in social media.    3 
  6. 6. 2. Background to the Floods In January and February 2011 Victorian experienced two flood events.  January The January floods were widespread encompassing large areas of western and north western Victoria.  Other areas of the state also experienced flooding at the same time, but in a more localised way.  The January floods were regional and rural in nature affecting sparsely populated farm land, and regional towns.  This flooding was, for most part, from rising rivers.  Locations anticipated to flood, were advised in advance.  The floods occurred between 10 – 20 January and some areas were inundated for some time.  February The February floods were largely in densely populated urban areas in and around Melbourne.    The flooding was more sudden than the January floods, and resulted from torrential rain.    The floods occurred  4 – 5 February  2011.      4 
  7. 7.  3. Background to the Review of the Use of Social Media in Flood Events Online and social media outlets were used extensively during the Victorian and Queensland floods by media, services, communities affected by the floods, and by other concerned and interested people.   Social media use adds a different dimension to emergency communications.  The traditional communications model of announcements being conveyed through known media sources can potentially be circumvented with people getting their information from each other rather than official sources.   Understanding the way in which social media was used in the Victorian floods was thought an important starting point in developing policy and approaches to the use of social media in future emergencies.   Research was undertaken to inform social media strategies for all Victorian Government agencies including VICSES.     5 
  8. 8.  4. Objectives of the Review Broad ranging objectives for the review were established and are summarised as follows:    • Document social media mentions during Victorian Floods   • Analyse comment by location and other characteristics   • Ascertain the nature of comments   • Establish flows of information   • Establish the nature of sharing of warnings and other information   • Explore the database for other useful insights   • Recommend approaches for future events   Some of these objectives have been more fully answered than others.    6 
  9. 9.  5. Methodology Detailed content analysis of social media comment is a relatively new field of research.  It essentially draws on text analysis techniques.  Social media monitoring services are able to collate commentary efficiently and to undertake rudimentary analysis by key word counts.  However, most data sets need further refinement to ensure comments relate to the topic at hand, and understanding the content, nature, and purpose of comments involves far more than word counts.    5.1 Methodology Summarised   5.2 Detailed MethodologyData collation The data for this study was captured from online publication.  Data is a comment from social media sources. The publication channels collected include: Twitter, open Facebook pages, open forums, open blogs and news sources (as identified by their domain description).  News sources are wide ranging in their nature.  The description includes well known large scale media operations (such the ABC, major masthead newspapers and television news), and also smaller scale, online only, news services.    The data was largely extracted by Buzz Numbers which is a commercial social media monitoring company.     7 
  10. 10. Data was collected on the basis of the specific search terms ”Victoria” or “ Vic” or “Floods”.  This data dated from 10 January.  Buzz Numbers provided the data in an Excel format for analysis.    A further source of commentary used was Rowfeeder.com which collates all comments from Twitter and Facebook. This information was collated from 26 January on the basis of the search term “Flood”.  The data was handled in such a way to ensure there was no duplication of data with Buzz Numbers.    In as much as possible comments about Queensland floods or floods in other parts of the world were excluded, nevertheless a total in excess of 320,000 comments about floods were collated.  Not all of these related to the Victorian floods so the data needed to be cleaned.  Data cleaning Both data sets were cleaned to ensure only commentary relating to the Victorian floods was included.  This was undertaken using a propriety product of Alliance Strategic Research called Simple Text Cleaner.  Comments on floods that included river or location names1 affected in the flooding, or simply Victoria floods or Vicfloods were retained in the data set, and all other comments discarded.  During reading for classification further comments were deleted as not being relevant to the Victorian floods.    Hence, comments relating to the Victorian floods that did not include the location names, or rivers, or the terms Victorian floods, Victoria floods or Vicfloods are not included in this analysis.  This cleaning process reduced the data set from in excess of 320,000 comments to 12,405 relevant comments.  All data collated was undertaken on the basis of key terms in the comment.  It does not search on the basis of author name (or Twitter @handle), unless directed to. Hence key official sources such as @Victoriapolice are not strongly represented in the data set as their Tweets (in particular) did not always include the word Victoria and floods.                                                             1  See appendix 1 for location and river names   8 
  11. 11. Data Classification Data extracted included the full text of the comment and other vital pieces of information such as the date and source (Twitter, Facebook, Blog, News, Forum).   In the case of Twitter comments the author name and handle are included, but not so in the case of Facebook and Forum comments.  News sources names are all identifiable.  The URL for every comment is also included in the data set. The data was classified along themes emerging in the text, and guided by the brief.  A key purpose of the study was to identify the role of social media in the Victorian flood event and in keeping with this requirement the purpose or intent of each comment was seen as highly relevant.  Hence the commentary was coded using a framework that emerged from the contents itself, but with this purpose in mind.   Privacy The issues around privacy in social media are complex and to some extend untried.  People who publish, make their comments public, via a channel known to be public, however this does not necessarily mean they understand they are publishing to the public.  It is very easy for anyone to go back to a Twitter account and directly contact that person, and many blogs and open Facebook pages allow comment.     9 
  12. 12. 6. Classification of commentsEach comment was read by one reader (thereby ensuring consistency in classification) and one of the following classifications was attributed to each comment.  People in the Floods    People experiencing floods (incl pics/videos & RTs2 of these)  Official Posts    Emergency Services & Government Departments and Agencies  News    News outlets/sources as defined by Buzz Media    Message Spreaders ‐ Warnings    RTs of official and unofficial warnings (inc road closures)  Spectators/Commentary    Spectators, well‐wishers, commentary about floods, observations about floods,  any comment about floods from individuals (inc a lot of blogs)  Message Spreaders ‐ Relief/Donations    Information and RTs about donations/concerts/fundraising/help available to  victims  Eg: Lifeline/mental health  Message Spreaders ‐ News (story about floods)    RTs and relayers of news articles about the floods Flood updates (put out by news outlet), news articles,   Message Spreaders ‐ News (story not about floods)  RTs and relayers of news articles that just mention/make reference to the vic  floods (but the article is not about the floods)    Eg. Articles about global disasters/climate change  Message Spreaders ‐ Information    RTs and information about floods     Eg. flood maps, relief centres & meetings, SES volunteer and other phone  numbers  Recovery/Post‐flood issues    Economic implications, inc for various industries, house & food prices,  government response to floods ($), political fallout  Social media    References to social medias role in communicating the floods; "twitter talk" ‐ the  frequent message spreaders saying goodnight to each other, etc  Commentary ‐ not directly about floods    People (personal and organisations, but not news outlets) who make reference  to the floods but are not talking about the floods specifically, inc (a lot of) blogs                                                         2  RT = Retweets.  Another’s message is passed on by using the ‘retweet’ function in Twitter.  Eg. If I follow  @Victorianpolice and get one of their messages I can retweet it and all my followers will receive the message  (although they do not follow Victorianpolice).  It effectively multiplies the message.    10 
  13. 13. Classifying the data in other ways and along themes is possible, but have not been explored further given the budget of this study. 6.1 Some Examples of Comments from Different Sorts of Message Spreaders3  • “come on queenslanders please give generously to the victorian flood  appeal!! “ (Facebook) Message Spreaders ‐ Relief/Donations  • “A flood watch is current for the greater Melbourne catchments of Werribee,  Maribyrnong, Yarra, Dandenong and Bunyip.” (Facebook) Message Spreaders  – Warnings  • “RT @VictoriaPolice: Police aware of flooding in Keysborough, Hampton Park,  Dandenong and Narre Warren areas.  Pls dont ring triple 000  ...”   (Twitter)  Message Spreaders ‐ Information  • “Want to help cleaning up the vic floods. Anyone looking for a small group of  friends to come and help clean this weekend? #vicfloods” (Twitter)  Recovery/Post‐flood issues  • “Australias top musical talent to perform for #vicflood relief tomorrow night  in #Melbourne.. How good!! http://bit.ly/xxxxxx “ (Twitter) Message  Spreaders ‐ Relief/Donations  • “After the devasting floods in Queensland and Victoria many organisations  companies and crafters are helping out with the relief effort.  Many craft sites  are auctioning goods and services with the proceeds going to the flood  appeal. Here are some of the sites: ...“  (Blog) Message Spreaders ‐  Relief/Donations  • “Australia warns of fresh floods: Residents in the flood‐hit city of Brisbane  brace for a king tide as more towns in Victoria are eva...” (Twitter) Message  Spreaders ‐ News                                                          3  Quotes are as written by author.  Twitter identities have been concealed    11 
  14. 14.                10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0 7.1 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 11/01/2011 10‐Jan 12/01/2011 11‐Jan 13/01/2011 12‐Jan 14/01/2011 13‐Jan 15/01/2011 14‐Jan 16/01/2011 15‐Jan 17/01/2011 16‐Jan 17‐Jan (or unspecified).  18/01/2011 18‐Jan 19/01/2011 19‐Jan 20/01/2011 20‐Jan 21/01/2011 21‐Jan 22/01/2011 22‐Jan releases on a daily basis.  23/01/2011 23‐Jan 24/01/2011 24‐Jan 25/01/2011 25‐Jan Major warnings 26/01/2011 26‐Jan 27‐Jan 27/01/2011 SES Message Out 28‐Jan 28/01/2011 29‐Jan 29/01/2011 30‐Jan 30/01/2011 31‐Jan 31/01/2011 1‐Feb Warnings 1/02/2011 2‐Feb 2/02/2011 3‐Feb 3/02/2011 4‐Feb 5‐Feb 4/02/2011 6‐Feb 5/02/2011 7‐Feb Per day 6/02/2011 8‐Feb Information Releases 7/02/2011 9‐Feb 8/02/2011 10‐Feb 9/02/2011 11‐Feb 10/02/2011 12‐Feb 13‐Feb Community/Advices 11/02/2011 Number of SES Releases 14‐Feb 12/02/2011 15‐Feb 13/02/2011 16‐Feb 14/02/2011 17‐Feb 15/02/2011 18‐Feb 16/02/2011 19‐Feb Nature of SES Releases Over Time Bulletins 20‐Feb 7. Profile of the Event from SES 17/02/2011 18/02/2011 21‐Feb 19/02/2011 22‐Feb 23‐Feb 20/02/2011 24‐Feb Misc 21/02/2011 25‐Feb Total of 653 releases over the period 10 Jan to 4 March  22/02/2011 26‐Feb 23/02/2011 27‐Feb 24/02/2011 28‐Feb 25/02/2011 1‐Mar 26/02/2011 2‐Mar 27/02/2011 3‐Mar 4‐Mar the course of the events.  The following graph charts the number of information  28/02/2011 Information releases in relation to the floods for warnings major/minor flooding,  1/03/2011 The nature of the message shifted over time in accordance with the floods as they  2/03/2011 unfolded.  The main message though, is ‘warnings’, either major or moderate/minor 12 evacuations, updates, bulletins, emergency alerts, community news were issued over     
  15. 15. 7.2 The Response to the Floods in Social MediaThe total number of comments on Victorian Floods collated over the review period was 12,405.    The social media comment peaks and drops away in line with the course of the flood events. When something is happening there are comments, then it drops away.  We also observe this much more acutely in other social media tracking where an event will be very short lived in social media.     The social media comment is not necessarily directly informed by the SES information releases.  Social media commentary was slow to pick up on the Victorian Floods in January (due possibly to media focus on the Queensland Floods) and was ahead of SES information releases in February.   Comments per Day Compared to  1000 Number of SES Releases 70 895 (All Sources) 60 800 50 654 600 40 400 30 20 200 146 10 0 0 10/1/11 11/1/11 12/1/11 13/1/11 14/1/11 15/1/11 16/1/11 17/1/11 18/1/11 19/1/11 20/1/11 21/1/11 22/1/11 23/1/11 24/1/11 25/1/11 26/1/11 27/1/11 28/1/11 29/1/11 30/1/11 31/1/11 10/2/11 11/2/11 12/2/11 13/2/11 14/2/11 15/2/11 16/2/11 17/2/11 18/2/11 19/2/11 20/2/11 21/2/11 22/2/11 23/2/11 24/2/11 25/2/11 26/2/11 27/2/11 28/2/11 1/2/11 2/2/11 3/2/11 4/2/11 5/2/11 6/2/11 7/2/11 8/2/11 9/2/11 1/3/11 2/3/11 3/3/11 4/3/11 SES Releases Total  The different nature and location of two flooding events may in part account for the different profile.  The February event was in Melbourne with a higher density of people, and was a sudden flooding event.  The peak includes people involved in the event.  The January event was in sparsely populated areas and was not sudden.    13 
  16. 16. The majority of comment collated is generated in Twitter ‐  Blogs have a surprisingly high profile, but blogs from news sources underpin these results (to some extent).  Source of Comment Communication Channel Twitter 6975 News 2490 Blogosphere 1959 Facebook 722 Forums 197 Video 62 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Number of comments  The following analysis shows Twitter comment is event sensitive rising and falling quickly – this is also evident in other categories Alliance Strategic Research tracks.  Blogs and news are more persistent sources of commentary. Facebook peaked in the Melbourne event, but did not feature strongly in the regional floods.    700 Channel Over Time 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1/02/2011 2/02/2011 3/02/2011 4/02/2011 5/02/2011 6/02/2011 7/02/2011 8/02/2011 9/02/2011 1/03/2011 2/03/2011 3/03/2011 4/03/2011 10/01/2011 11/01/2011 12/01/2011 13/01/2011 14/01/2011 15/01/2011 16/01/2011 17/01/2011 18/01/2011 19/01/2011 20/01/2011 21/01/2011 22/01/2011 23/01/2011 24/01/2011 25/01/2011 26/01/2011 27/01/2011 28/01/2011 29/01/2011 30/01/2011 31/01/2011 10/02/2011 11/02/2011 12/02/2011 13/02/2011 14/02/2011 15/02/2011 16/02/2011 17/02/2011 18/02/2011 19/02/2011 20/02/2011 21/02/2011 22/02/2011 23/02/2011 24/02/2011 25/02/2011 26/02/2011 27/02/2011 28/02/2011 twitter News Blogosphere facebook Forums Video  Unlike Twitter not all Facebook comments are public, so this chart cannot represent the full extent of Facebook commentary which is unknowable.   As the event recedes, news sources continue to publish stories (albeit in smaller number) whereas the citizen journalist stops altogether.  The public it appears is essentially responding to the event as it affects them at the time.   14 
  17. 17.  8. Nature of the Commentary A large proportion of the social media commentary is news.  News can be the headline for press articles or TV stories or online stories.  These comments are aiming to attract readership.  In this data set message spreading (of one sort or another) is a large part of the commentary.  Message spreading does not just relate to warnings.  Volume and Type of Comment News 3553 Message Spreaders ‐ Relief/donations 1983 Message Spreaders ‐ News 1837 Spectators/Commentary 1541 Recovery/Post‐flood issues 1016 Message Spreaders ‐ Warnings 930 Message Spreaders ‐ Information 591 People in the floods 539 Indirect Commentary 177 Social Media 170 Official Posts 68   Over the course of the flooding events, not only does the scale of commentary shift, so too does the type of commentary.   Intent of Comment Over Time People in Floods Official Posts News M.S. Warnings Spectators M.S. Donations M.S. News M.S. Info Recovery issues    15 
  18. 18. As the floods are occurring there is a great deal of news, and comments about where to donate and contribute to the relief funds.    Later in the time line recovery issues have a higher share of discussion, and news stories dominate. Share of comment on donations does not dropped away until March.  However this is off a very small base.  Comment from people in flood situations is low overall, except for the Melbourne flooding event.  This spike in comment is no doubt a result of the larger population and possibly a higher level of engagement with social media in urban areas.   250 Comment from People  in Flood Situations 200 192 150 100 50 0 13/01/2011 14/01/2011 15/01/2011 16/01/2011 19/01/2011 20/01/2011 21/01/2011 22/01/2011 23/01/2011 24/01/2011 25/01/2011 26/01/2011 27/01/2011 28/01/2011 29/01/2011 30/01/2011 31/01/2011 10/02/2011 11/02/2011 12/02/2011 14/02/2011 15/02/2011 16/02/2011 17/02/2011 18/02/2011 20/02/2011 21/02/2011 22/02/2011 23/02/2011 24/02/2011 25/02/2011 26/02/2011 27/02/2011 28/02/2011 1/02/2011 2/02/2011 3/02/2011 4/02/2011 5/02/2011 6/02/2011 7/02/2011 8/02/2011 9/02/2011 1/03/2011 2/03/2011 3/03/2011  The 192 comments on 4 February represent 29% of all of the comments made on that day.  Across the whole data set from 10 January to 4 March personal comments represent 4% of the total commentary.  8.1 Examples of Personal Comments4 • “There have been meetings called for residents of Swan Hill Pental Island and  Tyntynder tomorrow so that we can be updated as to what is happening.   There are rumors by the dozen floating around (pardon the pun) ‐ everything  from the town will be completely washed away to the water will  miraculously disappear.  I’m not taking any notice of them but we are closing  monitoring the radio to find out what is happening.” (Blog)  • “@xxxxx: RT @xxxxx Westernhighway between nhill horsham now open  #vicfloods i know as i am on it” (Twitter)                                                        4  Quotes are as written by author.  Twitter identities have been concealed    16 
  19. 19. • “Massive storms just hit Melbourne! Ex TC Yasi 2500 klms away! In 11 years  never seen my street in flood! Wow!”  (Twitter)  • “Just got home flood waters were lapping over the bonnet of the car scary  trip home” (Twitter )   • “Its so different when your part of a flood than watching it on news. I live near  Murray River, but i didnt expect it right outside my house haha NEVER GOING  TO FORGET TODAY!! Lol anyone want to give up there boat for me!? Haha”     (Facebook)   17 
  20. 20. 8.2 Content of CommentaryThe profile of the two floods in terms of comment intent is quite different, with Melbourne floods attracting more ‘spectators’ and comments from people in flood situations – in fact these two groups generated more messages than news services.    Type of Comment by Flood Area News 30% 19% M.S. Relief 17% 9% M.S. News 15% Vic Floods Melb Floods 13% Spectators/Commentary 11% 25% Post‐flood issues 9% 2% M.S. Warnings 7% 14% M.S. Info 5% 1% People in the flood 3% 17% Official Posts 1% 0%  Different channels are used in quite distinct ways for different message types.  Twitter is most often used for spreading warnings and information, whereas blogs for commentary.  Facebook also profiled strongly for people involved in the floods, but the overall number of comments was lower.  Video was most often posted by people in the floods.  Source by Intent of Comment Message Spreader ‐ Warnings Message Spreader ‐ Information Social Media News People in the flood Message Spreader ‐ News Message Spreader ‐ Relief/donations Official Posts Spectator/Commentary Recovery/Post‐flood issues Indirect Commentary Blogosphere Facebook Forums News Twitter Video  Note: Classification is normalised to allow comparison of channels used    18 
  21. 21. Overall the location which attracted the greatest number of comments was Melbourne. It appears areas with larger populations attract more comment.    Areas which were affected for longer periods such as Swan Hill also have more comment.   Location No. of Mentions Melbourne 1193 Swan Hill 544 Kerang 432 Horsham 234 Charlton 206 Dimboola 151 Ballarat 131 Warracknabeal 127 Rochester 103 Donald 67 Beulah 59 Echuca 57 Skipton 53 Shepparton 51 Richmond 34   The following graph charts the commentary by location over time.  In terms of locations, comment about the Melbourne floods is short lived. Swan Hill commentary continues for some time – relating to the duration of the event.  Mentions of Locations by Date 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 1/02/2011 2/02/2011 3/02/2011 4/02/2011 5/02/2011 6/02/2011 7/02/2011 8/02/2011 9/02/2011 1/03/2011 2/03/2011 3/03/2011 4/03/2011 10/01/2011 11/01/2011 12/01/2011 13/01/2011 14/01/2011 15/01/2011 16/01/2011 17/01/2011 18/01/2011 19/01/2011 20/01/2011 21/01/2011 22/01/2011 23/01/2011 24/01/2011 25/01/2011 26/01/2011 27/01/2011 28/01/2011 29/01/2011 30/01/2011 31/01/2011 10/02/2011 11/02/2011 12/02/2011 13/02/2011 14/02/2011 15/02/2011 16/02/2011 17/02/2011 18/02/2011 19/02/2011 20/02/2011 21/02/2011 22/02/2011 23/02/2011 24/02/2011 25/02/2011 26/02/2011 27/02/2011 28/02/2011 Swan Hill Kerang Horsham Charlton Dimboola Ballarat Warracknabeal Rochester Melbourne     19 
  22. 22. Overall comment on specific rivers is relatively low given they were the source of the flooding in regional areas and the subject of many SES information releases.   350 322 Comments Naming  300 Rivers 250 195 200 173 141 150 100 77 68 50 0 Murray Loddon Wimmera Yarra Avoca Campaspe   The Yarra had the highest number of warnings messages spread.  There was comparatively little relating to non urban rivers.   Type of Commentary  by River Mentions 350 300 19 250 200 1 150 100 144 50 94 119 0 9 Wimmera Murray Yarra Loddon People in Floods Official posts News MS Warnings Spectators MS Relief MS News MS News Recovery Issues   The Yarra River flood attracted a lot of comment, but not around the flooding event in February. The early spike in comments about the Yarra related to an incident where two people floated down the flooded river with an inflatable doll.    20 

×