Coffee:
Healthy Habit or Not?
Prepared by O. Kucukoglu
Facts about Coffee



Most popular beverage in the World
(over 1 billion coffee drinkers worldwide)



Global consumptio...
Benefits of Coffee Consumption


Decrease the incidence of chronic liver disease (>2 cups/day) (1)


Protect against hep...
Benefits of Coffee Consumption


Prevent depression (3 cups/d, ↓ 15%) and increase motivation (1)



Memory improvement ...
Risks of Coffee Consumption


Late miscarriage and still birth in pregnancy (1,2)



Psychoactive (3,4)



Affecting sl...
The overall balance of risks and benefits of
coffee consumption are on the side of benefits

Let‘s go for a COFFEE
Thank you for your attention 
What is Coffee?



Overall, coffee is a good source of the B vitamin riboflavin, and is
also a concentrated source of an...


However, UGT 1A gene induction by coffee takes place
independently from the caffeine content, and independent of
cafest...


Amount of chlorogenic acids and melanoidins ingested with the
consumption of one cup of espresso or filtered coffee and...
Possible pathways correlating coffee intake to
the reduction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk
Coffee: Healty Habit or Not
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Coffee: Healty Habit or Not

284 views
147 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
284
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Alternaatives:
    Coffee: Medicine or Poison?
    Coffee: Bad or Good for your Health?
  • Health is influenced by genetic, lifestyle, and diet determinants; therefore, nutrition plays an essential role in health management. 
  • The antifibrotic properties of coffee have been demonstrated in Wistar rats, where coffee was shown to protect against liver injury induced by TAA, leading to reduced hepatic necroinflammation and fibrosis!
    Coffee has also been shown to activate a family of enzymes involved in the hepatic detoxification process including uridine 5’-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT), with initial studies demonstrating that the diterpines were responsible for the activation of UGT!! (Glucuronidation is the major pathway in hepatic phase II metabolism)
  • Caffeine increases energy metabolism throughout the brain but decreases at the same time cerebral blood flow, inducing a relative brain hypoperfusion. Caffeine activates noradrenaline neurons and seems to affect the local release of dopamine. 
    EPIDEMIOLOGICAL studies have indicated that coffee consumption may be protective in Alzheimer's (AD) (Barranco Quintana et al. 2007) and Parkinson's diseases (PD) (Hu et al. 2007).
  • The antifibrotic properties of coffee have been demonstrated in Wistar rats, where coffee was shown to protect against liver injury induced by TAA, leading to reduced hepatic necroinflammation and fibrosis!
    Coffee has also been shown to activate a family of enzymes involved in the hepatic detoxification process including uridine 5’-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT), with initial studies demonstrating that the diterpines were responsible for the activation of UGT!! (Glucuronidation is the major pathway in hepatic phase II metabolism)
  • coffee’s reputation isn’t as black as previously labeled.
  • Schematic overview of proposed hepatoprotective molecular signaling pathways triggered by coffee and the ingredients therein. (I)
    Caffeine mediated antagonism of TGF- signaling. Caffeine leads to an elevation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations
    resulting in enhanced ubiquitination/proteasomal degradation of the TGF- effector Smad2 by the ubiquitin–ligase Smurf2, which displays high
    sensitivity toward this particular Smad as well as to the TGF- type I receptor complex, to which Smad3 is allosterically bound upon activation of the
    receptor by its cytokine. (II) Coffee components stimulate Nrf2/ARE-regulated signal transduction. Caffeine phosphorylates Nrf2 via the MAP-kinase
    pathway, and kahweol and cafestol initiate thiol modification of cysteine residues in Keap1, thereby disrupting the cytoplasmic Keap1/Nrf2 complex,
    which results in a release of Nrf2 and in its translocation to the nucleus where it transcriptionally activates ARE-dependent genes, including several
    phase II xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes such as UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and others. In this issue of
    GASTROENTEROLOGY, Kalthoff et al show that the induction of UGT 1A by Nrf2 in the presence of various coffee preparations is not exclusively
    dependent on caffeine or kahweol and cafestol, thereby triggering a new search for yet undiscovered Nrf2/ARE activating substances in coffee.
  • Coffee: Healty Habit or Not

    1. 1. Coffee: Healthy Habit or Not? Prepared by O. Kucukoglu
    2. 2. Facts about Coffee  Most popular beverage in the World (over 1 billion coffee drinkers worldwide)  Global consumption => 6.7 million tons/year
    3. 3. Benefits of Coffee Consumption  Decrease the incidence of chronic liver disease (>2 cups/day) (1)  Protect against hepatic fibrosis in      Alcoholic steatohepatitis (↓ risk of alcoholic cirrhosis as non-coffee drinkers ) (2) Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (p=0.001) (3) Obese patients (regular coffee, but not espresso) (4) Chronic HCV (↓ liver fibrosis ) (5,8) Reduction of HCC (41% ↓ risk of HCC among coffee vs never coffee drinkers) (6,7)  Prevent diabetes ( ↓ type II diabetes (p=0.05); 3-6 cups/d=> ↓ 25% lower risk) (9)  Decaffeinated coffee can acutely decrease hunger(10) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) Torres DM, Harrison SA, Gastroenterology, 2013. Klatsky A, Armstrong MA. Am J Epidemiol 1992. Birerdinc A. et al. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2012. Gressner OA. Gastroenterology 2010. Huxley R. et al. Arch Intern Med 2009. (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) Bravi F. et al. Hepatology 2007. Arauz J. et al. J Appl Toxicol 2012. Freedman ND. et.al. Gastroenterology, 2011. Panagiotakos D. et al. Rev Diabet Stud 2007. Greenberg JA, Gleibter A, J Am Coll Nutr. 2012.
    4. 4. Benefits of Coffee Consumption  Prevent depression (3 cups/d, ↓ 15%) and increase motivation (1)  Memory improvement (2), increase cognitive performance and remember (1)  Reduce risk/ no effect some cancers   Endometrial (↓ 29%), Pancreas (-), prostate (↓20%) (5, 6) Decrease the risk of death (> 400,000 people, age 50-71, follow up 14-year)  heart and respiratory disease  stroke,  injuries and accidents,  diabetes, and infections(7) (1) (2) Cornelis MC, Progress in Mol Biol, 2012. (3) Barranco Quintana et al. Neurol. Res. 2007 (6) Hameleers, P. et. Al. Human Psychopharmacology et al. Mov. Disord. 2007 (4) Hu (7) 2000. (5) Je Y, et. al. Int J Cancer. 2011. (8) Genkinger J et al. Cancer Epidem.Biomark. Prev. 2011. Freedman ND, et al. N Engl J Med 2012. Dostal V, Genetics, 2010.
    5. 5. Risks of Coffee Consumption  Late miscarriage and still birth in pregnancy (1,2)  Psychoactive (3,4)  Affecting sleep and nervous (3)  Nonfiltered/boiled coffee=> increase cholesterol (5)   Continuous stomach problems (6) and diarrhea Increase risk of coronary heart disease mortality   (1) (2) (3) (4) >9 cups/d=> 2x in men, 5.1x in women) (7) Coffee could be LETAL=> more than 100 cups in 4 hours!!! American Institute for Cancer Research’e e-news, 2012., Wisborg K. et. al. MBJ 2003. Nehlig A. et al. Res. Brain Res Rev1992. Wikipedia (5) (6) (7) Cai L. et al. Eur. J. of Clin.l Nutrition, 2012. Hendrick B, WebMD Health News, 2010 Tverdal A. et al. BMJ 1990.
    6. 6. The overall balance of risks and benefits of coffee consumption are on the side of benefits Let‘s go for a COFFEE
    7. 7. Thank you for your attention 
    8. 8. What is Coffee?   Overall, coffee is a good source of the B vitamin riboflavin, and is also a concentrated source of antioxidant phytochemicals. Coffee contains:       Chlorogenic acid, an antioxidant compound that is the major phenol in coffee Quinic acid, a phytochemical that contributes to the acidic taste of coffee Cafestol and kahweol, compounds that are extracted from the beans' oil during brewing. Unfiltered coffee, such as French press or boiled coffee, contains these compounds Caffeine, a naturally occurring stimulant that affects the central nervous system N-methylpyridinium (NMB), created by roasting, may make the antioxidants more potent Chlorogenic acid may be slightly lower in decaf coffee according to limited research, but it still contains plenty of phytochemicals. Lab studies suggest that instant may be lower in antioxidant potency than brewed coffee, though more research is needed.
    9. 9.  However, UGT 1A gene induction by coffee takes place independently from the caffeine content, and independent of cafestol or kahweol.
    10. 10.  Amount of chlorogenic acids and melanoidins ingested with the consumption of one cup of espresso or filtered coffee and putative amount reaching the colon Vitaglione P. et. al. Food Funct., 2012
    11. 11. Possible pathways correlating coffee intake to the reduction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk

    ×