• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Cct333 lecture
 

Cct333 lecture

on

  • 676 views

Guest lecture from Chris Bint, head of the Elder Technology Assistance Group at Sheridan (and former student of mine in CCIT - nice to see people use what they've learned!) Posted here since my ...

Guest lecture from Chris Bint, head of the Elder Technology Assistance Group at Sheridan (and former student of mine in CCIT - nice to see people use what they've learned!) Posted here since my course wiki doesn't accept large files. http://cct333-w11.wikispaces.com for the course wiki.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
676
Views on SlideShare
676
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Cct333 lecture Cct333 lecture Presentation Transcript

    • What’s a Facebook?
    • Welcome! Before we get started… A little information about myself and
    • I came from CCIT @ UTM / Sheridan Graduated in 2008
    • I took CCT333 in 2004
      • The course was heavily geared towards physical prototypes and design principles
      • no touch screen devices yet
      • being ‘mobile’ was uncommon
      • iTunes was brand new
    • In CCIT at Sheridan, I learned about the Sheridan Elder Research Centre (SERC) Volunteered for a study that investigated the process of education for seniors learning to use a computer. “ Tech Tutor”
    • SERC’s study was interesting for a number of reasons… I learned many things about technology and people
    • Technology supports lifelong learning
    • Young educators can teach technology
    • Technology education can start intergenerational relationships
    • The Internet can easily be considered an assistive technology It enables a person to do SO much!
    • I volunteered with SERC for 3 years After graduating from CCIT, I started
    • Elder Technology Assistance Group is a non-profit organization dedicated to eliminating the digital divide that exists between much of the older adult demographic and the younger, more technology savvy generations. If it plugs into the wall or runs on a battery, ETAG can help 
    • Why help seniors learn about technology? It enables communication Creates choices and opportunities Provides a sense of freedom
    • Volunteer Technology Assistance Program Technology assistance initiatives include: Life Long Learning Workshops Retirement Community Classes
    • So…
    • What’s the bright idea behind ETAG’s Volunteer Technology Assistance Program? Pair tech savvy volunteers with older adults who have the desire to learn how to use modern computer technologies.
    • Let’s pause for a second…
    • Do you know what they are moving in this picture? 5MB of storage in 1956. Things change fast…
    • Many seniors are disconnected from modern technology due to:
      • speed of change
      • diversity of options
      • unfamiliarity
      • misunderstanding
      • a lack of instruction
    • We want to make sure that older adults are given an equal opportunity to stay connected with technology.
    • Usability is #1 for ETAG low usability = not very usable
    • Usability is…
      • effective to use (effectiveness)
      • efficient to use (efficiency)
      • safe to use (safety)
      • have good utility (utility)
      • easy to learn (learnability)
      • easy to remember (memorability)
      Preece, Jenny, Yvonne Rogers, and Helen Sharp. Interaction Design: beyond Human-computer Interaction . New York, NY: J. Wiley & Sons, 2002. Print.
    • Effectiveness How good a “system” is at doing what it is supposed to do. Preece, Jenny, Yvonne Rogers, and Helen Sharp. Interaction Design: beyond Human-computer Interaction . New York, NY: J. Wiley & Sons, 2002. Print. EX: Doro instructions
    • Efficiency The way a “system” supports users in carrying out their tasks. Preece, Jenny, Yvonne Rogers, and Helen Sharp. Interaction Design: beyond Human-computer Interaction . New York, NY: J. Wiley & Sons, 2002. Print. EX: Personalizing OS to remove steps
    • Safety Protecting the user from dangerous conditions and undesirable situations Preece, Jenny, Yvonne Rogers, and Helen Sharp. Interaction Design: beyond Human-computer Interaction . New York, NY: J. Wiley & Sons, 2002. Print. EX: Chatroulette.com
    • Utility Extent to which the “system” provides the right kind of functionality so that users can do what they need or want to do. Preece, Jenny, Yvonne Rogers, and Helen Sharp. Interaction Design: beyond Human-computer Interaction . New York, NY: J. Wiley & Sons, 2002. Print. EX: Pointerware
    • Learnability How easy a “system” is to learn and use. Preece, Jenny, Yvonne Rogers, and Helen Sharp. Interaction Design: beyond Human-computer Interaction . New York, NY: J. Wiley & Sons, 2002. Print. EX: Learn to recognize
    • Memorability How easy a “system” is to remember how to use, once learned. Preece, Jenny, Yvonne Rogers, and Helen Sharp. Interaction Design: beyond Human-computer Interaction . New York, NY: J. Wiley & Sons, 2002. Print.
    • SERC Research Project: Web Usability for Seniors
      • is Canada’s largest online non-prescription pharmacy product retailer
      • Most of their clients are ages 35 and under
      • SERC is working with Well.ca to help them figure out how to expand their older adult customer base
    • Why is SERC interested in this?
      • Well.ca ships anywhere in Canada for free, and has customer service representatives available as an alternative way to place an order
      • Access to this type of service could help:
        • Caregivers of older adults
        • Seniors with poor access to transportation
        • Older adults who may need to buy hard-to-find products or very personal items
    • SERC needs CCIT’s help!
      • A key part of whether Well.ca will be useful to older adults is whether the site itself is usable
        • Is it easy to read and navigate?
        • Is it easy to place an order?
        • Is it clear how to search for a product?
      • We need CCIT students to test the site to find all of the potential difficulties that an older adult (or a younger adult!) might run into
    • What does helping entail?
      • 1 – 2 hour session at the SERC computer lab to put the site through its paces
      • Snacks and beverages will be provided
      • When will this be held?
      • Fill in the sheet provided to indicate your availability to volunteer
      • The best time for the most people will be determined based on your class schedules on the Sheridan campus
    • Thanks 