Public Participation in Changing Times

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  • Sometimes this means action by citizens that is seeded by gov’t with small grants
  • Refer to Using Online Tools guide
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  • Rio Grande do Sol - http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/node/5998
  • Public Participation in Changing Times

    1. 1. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION INCHANGING TIMESMatt LeighningerFIU workshopJune 20, 2013
    2. 2. THE DELIBERATIVE DEMOCRACY CONSORTIUM
    3. 3. THE CONTEXT:HOW HAVE CITIZENS* CHANGED? More educated More skeptical – differentattitudes toward authority Have less time to spare Better able to findresources, allies,information* “citizens” = residents,people
    4. 4. THE CONTEXT:FAMILIES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN Have the most at stake in community success More motivation to engage, but even less time Want to engage in community, not just politics
    5. 5. THE CONTEXT: INCREASED USE OF THE INTERNET
    6. 6. THREE MINUTES AT THE MICROPHONERetrieved from Cincinnati.com, July 27, 2012
    7. 7. “WHAT DROVE ME TO TRY PLANNED,STRUCTURED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENTWAS MY AWFUL EXPERIENCE WITHUNPLANNED, UNSTRUCTURED PUBLICENGAGEMENT.”─ John Nalbandian,former mayor,Lawrence, KS
    8. 8. SUCCESSFUL TACTIC: PROACTIVE RECRUITMENT Map community networks; Involve leaders of those networks; „Who is leastlikely toparticipate?‟ Use online aswell as f2fconnections; Follow up!
    9. 9. SUCCESSFUL TACTIC: SMALL-GROUP PROCESSES No more than 12 people per group; Facilitator who is impartial (doesn‟t giveopinions); Start with peopledescribing theirexperiences; Lay out options; Help people planfor action.
    10. 10. SUCCESSFUL TACTIC: FRAMING AN ISSUE Give people the information they need, in waysthey can use it Lays out several options or views (includingones you don‟t agree with) Trust themto make gooddecisions
    11. 11. SUCCESSFUL TACTIC: ENCOURAGING CITIZEN ACTION
    12. 12. SUCCESSFUL TACTIC: ONLINE TOOLSParticularly good for: Providing background information Data gathering by citizens Generating andranking ideas Helping peoplevisualize options Maintainingconnectionsover time
    13. 13. “DECATUR NEXT”DECATUR, GEORGIA Large-scale planning efforts in 2000,2010 Initial Organizer: city government anda local nonprofit (Common Focus) Issues: schools, race, growth 450 participants in 2000, 680 in 2010(city of 17,000)
    14. 14. “DECATUR ROUNDTABLES”DECATUR, GEORGIAOutcomes:• Decatur Neighborhood Alliance• Promotion of tax abatement plan for seniors,other anti-displacement efforts• Less tension between different groups• New model for land use decisions• Extensive citizen input into city‟s strategic plan
    15. 15. SHARE YOUR STORY, SHAPE YOUR CARE”NORTHWESTERN ONTARIO• Began in 2009• North West Ontario Local Health IntegrationNetwork, Ascentum• Issue: health care planning andimprovement of health care services• 800 participants• Received IAP2 award
    16. 16. Element 1 – Online choicebook that providedbackground information and data, describedmain optionsSHARE YOUR STORY, SHAPE YOUR CARE”NORTHWESTERN ONTARIO
    17. 17. Element 2 – Online “stories and ideas” tool thatallowed people to share experiences, solutionsSHARE YOUR STORY, SHAPE YOUR CARE”NORTHWESTERN ONTARIO
    18. 18. Element 3 – Conversation guide for face-to-face, moderated small-group meetingsSHARE YOUR STORY, SHAPE YOUR CARE”NORTHWESTERN ONTARIO
    19. 19. “COMMUNITY CHAT”SOUTHWEST DELRAY BEACH, FLOutcomes:• Parent support group• Youth basketball team• Expansion of “Delray Divas” youth group• Westside Neighborhood Presidents‟ Council• Citizen input to street redevelopment plan• “Maintaining the Village”effort to rehab housing• New deregulated publicschool
    20. 20. “HORIZONS”RURAL COMMUNITIES IN SEVENNORTHWESTERN STATES• Initiated by Northwest Area Foundation• 284 towns, with poverty rates between 10%and 78%• Issues: poverty reduction and economicdevelopment• 3,000+ participants
    21. 21. “HORIZONS”RURAL COMMUNITIES IN SEVENNORTHWESTERN STATESOutcomes listed in recent evaluation:“Community gardens and farmer‟s markets,parks, trails (one with a $1.2 million grant), andrecreational opportunities, community andcommunity resource centers, scholarships forlow income children and families for daycare,after school programming and recreation,including Boys and Girls‟ clubs, car repair andhome maintenance programs, and in (at least)five communities, the establishment ofcommunity foundations.”
    22. 22. NATIONAL DIALOGUE ON MENTAL HEALTH
    23. 23. QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS?
    24. 24. STRENGTHS OF PUBLIC PARTICIPATION Making policy decisions, plans, budgets Catalyzing citizen action Building trust, fostering new leadership Connections = disaster preparedness Attachment = economic vitality
    25. 25. LIMITATIONS OF PUBLIC PARTICIPATION (ASWE PRACTICE IT TODAY) Lots of work for temporary gain Inefficient – every organization on its own Community moves back to „politics as usual‟ „Engagers‟ set the agenda, not the „engaged‟ Limited impact on equity Laws on participation outof step with practices Not well measured orbenchmarked
    26. 26. WHAT IS CIVIC INFRASTRUCTURE?The regular opportunities, activities,and arenas that allow people toconnect with each other, solveproblems, make decisions, and bepart of a community.
    27. 27. “PORTSMOUTH LISTENS”PORTSMOUTH, NH Ongoing process since 2000 Several hundred participants each time Addressed a number of major policydecisions: bullying in schools, schoolredistricting, city‟s master plan, balancing citybudget, whether to build new middle school
    28. 28. JANE ADDAMS SCHOOL FOR DEMOCRACYWEST SIDE OF ST. PAUL, MN 50-200 people in “neighborhood learningcircles” every month since 1998 Involves recent Hmong, Latino, Somaliimmigrants Young people involved in circles and otheractivities Cultural exchanges - food, crafts, storytelling Has resulted in newprojects, initiatives,festivals, and changein INS policy
    29. 29. PARTICIPATORY BUDGETING IN BRAZILIAN CITIES Commitment from gov‟t to adopt budget; Wide range of ways to be involved; A carnivalatmosphere; Started small,now huge –60,000+ people
    30. 30. “KUNA ALLIANCE FOR A COHESIVECOMMUNITY TEAM” KUNA, ID Recurring input-gathering process, used onall major decisions Organized by Kuna Alliance for a CohesiveTeam (Kuna ACT), in collaboration with localgovernment Issues include: school funding, downtowndevelopment, planning and growth 500 participants annually (city of 6,000)
    31. 31. “KUNA ALLIANCE FOR A COHESIVECOMMUNITY TEAM” KUNA, IDOutcomes: New comprehensive plan Passage of school bond issue Improvementsmade todowntown New strategy tomarket communityas hub for “Birdsof Prey” area
    32. 32. NEW MODEL ORDINANCE ON PUBLICPARTICIPATIONAvailable at www.deliberative-democracy.netDeveloped as a collaboration of:
    33. 33. BUILDING BLOCKS FOR CIVIC INFRASTRUCTURE
    34. 34. BUILDING BLOCK:Helpingneighborhood andschool groupsbecome more- effective- inclusive- participatory
    35. 35. BUILDING BLOCK: HYPERLOCAL ONLINEFORUMSMore sustainedLarger, more diverse numbers of peopleEasier for „engagers‟ – recruitment doesn‟t have to startfrom scratchMore open to ideas from the „engaged‟
    36. 36. DIGITAL DIVIDES (PLURAL) Overall, Internet access growing “Access” – to Internet, to government – hasnever been enough Different people use different hardware Different people go to different places on theInternet Communities just as complex online as off –recruitment must be proactive
    37. 37. BUILDING BLOCK: CIVIC INDICATORS1. Capture more of the basic data2. Use databases3. Establish „mid-level‟ indicators toconnect basic data with „metadata‟ likeSoul of the Community4. Be transparent – and think about ways toallow people to contribute and analyzedata
    38. 38. BUILDING BLOCK: YOUTH LEADERSHIP
    39. 39. “Sometimes you need a meeting thatis also a party. Sometimes you needa party that is also a meeting.”─ Gloria Rubio-Cortès, NationalCivic LeagueDON‟T FORGET: FUN
    40. 40. SLIDES AVAILABLE AT:WWW.SLIDESHARE.NET/MATTLEIGHNINGERGUIDES:HTTP://BIT.LY/PSLDNLCHTTP://BIT.LY/IWJGQN
    41. 41. RESOURCESwww.participedia.netwww.deliberative-democracy.netwww.soulofthecommunity.orgwww.everydaydemocracy.orgwww.publicagenda.orgwww.kettering.org
    42. 42. QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS?

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