Effective Measures Against the Recession
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Effective Measures Against the Recession

on

  • 4,782 views

Conferencia de Edward C. Prescott, premio Noberl de Economía, dentro del programa "Madrid, Comunidad del Conocimiento". 6 de julio de 2009.

Conferencia de Edward C. Prescott, premio Noberl de Economía, dentro del programa "Madrid, Comunidad del Conocimiento". 6 de julio de 2009.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
4,782
Views on SlideShare
3,449
Embed Views
1,333

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
30
Comments
0

3 Embeds 1,333

http://nonicoclolasos.wordpress.com 1281
http://www.slideshare.net 48
https://nonicoclolasos.wordpress.com 4

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Effective Measures Against the Recession Effective Measures Against the Recession Presentation Transcript

  • Effective Measures Against the  Recession Edward C. Prescott July 6, 2009 1
  • U.S. Long‐Run Picture • Relatively steady growth over the last 150  years • Some fluctuations about trend (HP filtered) Source of following pictures is Robert E. Lucas, Jr. 2
  • 3
  • Deviations From Trend • Relative to trend, GDP lost 40% between 1929  and 1933 • Recently the loss has been about 5%, and most  of this is in 2008‐IV and 2009‐I 4
  • 5
  • How Bad Are Things? Not that bad, so far 6
  • Contractions (Recessions) • Recession is not an economic concept • An economy can’t be in one or not in one • Prior to development of modern macro, it was  not a well‐defined empirical concept • It was totally discredited by Nobel Laureate  T. J. Koopmans in his devastating critique of  Burns and Mitchell (the NBER definitions) as  measurement without theory 7
  • Sensible Definition of a Contraction • Any sensible definition corrects for  population and trend growth • A flat line is neither losing nor gaining  ground relative to the industrial leaders • A flat line means living standards double  every generation 8
  • Detrended GDP per Person 16‐64 1959‐I to  2009‐I 110 Period Average = 100 105 100 95 * Quarterly trend growth: 0.45% 90 1959-I 1965-I 1971-I 1977-I 1983-I 1989-I 1995-I 2001-I 2007-I 9
  • Now There Is Hard Theory • Given productivity, population, and taxes: – Predicted and actual paths of the aggregate  variables coincide  – All using dynamic economic theory to  construct models consistent with national  account and other data find same thing – We find monetary policy had little  consequence 10
  • Contractions: Detrended GDP per Person 16‐64 1959‐I to 2009‐I 110 Period Average = 100 105 100 95 * Quarterly trend growth: 0.45% 90 1959-I 1965-I 1971-I 1977-I 1983-I 1989-I 1995-I 2001-I 2007-I 11
  • Contractions • Biggest contraction was 11.2% from 1978‐IV to  1982‐IV – First two years of it, money was loose– low  real interest rate – Last two years and beyond, money was tight • The contraction beginning in 1999‐IV was  bigger than figure indicates because – There was a huge amount of unmeasured  investment in the second half of the 1990s 12
  • Expansions • Big expansion of early 1960s was technology  driven • The 1995‐2000 expansion was technology driven – And in fact was significantly bigger and  longer than standard statistics indicate – Reason: Huge unmeasured intangible  investment (R&D, launching new products) • The second biggest and the longest expansion  was in the 1980s and was due to cuts in  marginal tax rates 13
  • Expansions: Detrended GDP  per Person 16‐64 1959‐I to 2009‐I 110 Period Average = 100 105 100 95 * Quarterly trend growth: 0.45% 90 1959-I 1965-I 1971-I 1977-I 1983-I 1989-I 1995-I 2001-I 2007-I 14
  • What Depressed the U.S. Economy in  2008‐IV and 2009‐I? • Fed did what it should given the situation – Big increase in reserves • Fed is not the cause of the recent drop in  U.S. GDP (4.0% trend corrected and probably  another 1.0% this quarter) • Not the financial crisis • Not lack of borrowing 15
  • Liabilities of Households and of  their Nonfinancial Businesses End 2007 End 2008 Total Liabilities  (billions $) 31,875 32,341 Composition Share Mortgages 44.9% 44.4% Other Loans 18.0% 18.5% Corporate Bonds 11.2% 12.0% Security credit 1.0% 0.5% Trade payable 8.2% 8.5% Other   16.8% 16.1% 16
  • Then What Depressed the U.S. Economy in  2008‐IV and 2009‐I‐II? • Fact: Investment became depressed • There are 25 million small businesses in the  U.S. – 5 million of them have employees • Their owners feared higher tax rates – Rationally cut investment  – Rationally cut employment  – Took more cash out of business  • Workers fearing job loss rationally cut auto  buying 17
  • Fears Are Being Realized • Tax rates are being increased • These increases lower amount of capital a  firms chooses to have • Reason for low investment is not problem of  getting loans – it is expected high tax rates 18
  • What Happened after Financial Crises? Sometimes bad things and Sometimes good things Numbers are trend corrected so flat line is  growing at trend 19
  • Experiences Very Different GDP per Capita Detrended at 2% 1992 = 100 140 Finland 120 100 80 Japan Source: GGDC (PPP-EKS) 60 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 20
  • GDP per Capita Detrended at 2% 1980 = 100 140 Chile 120 100 Mexico 80 Source: GGDC (GK-PPP) 60 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 21
  • Cost of Current Crisis • Huge bailout of lenders to financial  intermediaries by taxpayers • This means higher tax rates in future and  depresses the economy now • The so‐called stimulus plan is a depressant  plan 22
  • Evidence that High Marginal Tax Rates  Depress an Economy • This uses the simple methodology developed in  my American Economic Association 2002 Ely  Lecture • Factors other than the marginal tax rate  matter • Also errors in measuring hours worked 23
  • Predicted vs. Actual Weekly Hours predicted 30.0 Japan 28.0 Australia New Zeland Iceland 26.0 Ireland Portugal Romania Spain 24.0 U.S. U.K. 22.0 Canada 20.0 France Germany Denmark Italy 18.0 16.0 16.0 18.0 20.0 22.0 24.0 26.0 28.0 30.0 actual 24
  • Effective Measures Against the Depression in U.S. Economy • Cut marginal tax rates • Become more open • Follow pro‐productivity policies 25
  • Openness and Spain’s GDP Per Capita  Relative to U.S. Moderately Integrated  Before 1930 42% Little Integrated  1940‐54 22% Moderately Integrated 1965 36% Becomes EU Member 1981 49% Highly Integrated 2007 61% 26
  • Government Spending Doesn’t Stimulate the  Economy 27
  • Summers’ Misguided Advice to Japan • Repeatedly said to spend and stimulate their  economy in 1990s and Japan did • What happened? Japan lost a decade of growth • Geithner, who is not an economist, is now  advising China to spend in order to stimulate  its economy 28
  • Why Japan’s Lost a Decade of Growth? • Some blamed China • Others blamed the Bank of Japan • Still others blamed fiscal policy – Said Japan needed even bigger deficits • Hayashi and Prescott in “Japan’s Lost  Decade of Growth” find the problem was lack of productivity growth! 29
  • Why Low Productivity Growth? • Hayashi and I conjectured: banks subsidizing  inefficiencies – Loans were being made to pay interest on  existing loans – Banks’ liabilities exceeded assets • Subsidizing inefficient businesses deters  productivity growth 30
  • Japan’s Reaction • Cabinet Research Office invited me to talk in  2002 • Signaled Prime Minister Koizumi was buying  into the productivity story • Takenaka, new head of Financial Services,  instituted banking reforms 31
  • Banking Reforms • Wrote off bad loans • Refinanced insolvent banks • Required honest accounting when meeting  capital requirements 32
  • What Happened After Reforms • Productivity growth rebounded – No helicopter drops of money – No big increases in spending – No Chinese collapse • Reason for rebound – Making the banking system sound again 33
  • Detrended GDP per Capita   110 US 100 90 Japan 80 70 EU - 15 60 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 34 Source: GGDC
  • An Efficient Crisis‐Free Financial System • Friedman argues for 100% reserve banking with  interest on reserves • Justification is stability • I argue for Friedman’s system for the  commercial banking system 35
  • Good Financial Regulation • Friedman argues for 100% reserve banking • Justification is stability • I argue for 100% reserve commercial banking  system (with interest on reserves) • AND a ban on financial intermediation, which  rules out Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers 36
  • Regulation Depresses Productivity • Actions are often taken for political reasons • Recent financial crisis and earlier S&L  crisis due to policies designed to increase  home ownership • Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, two government‐ sponsored enterprises, began holding subprime  mortgages because politicians forced them to • Congress passed laws that effectively  required banks to make subprime mortgage  loans when enforced 37
  • Financial Intermediation Serves No  Purpose • Financial intermediation is when a limited  liability business borrows from one group and  lends to another, and is highly leveraged • It is just gambling on a grand scale • When financial intermediaries get big, the  taxpayers bail them out when they fail • As a taxpayer, I don’t like bailing out  Goldman Sachs, AIG, and Deutsche Bank 38
  • How Are Investments Financed? • Currently 80 percent financed by equity and  mutual lending • Other 20 percent financed by bank lending • The part currently financed by bank lending  would have to be financed other ways 39
  • What Other Ways? • Use more equity  • Use more mutual lending – Mutual insurance companies – Venture capital group – REITS – Mutual pension funds – Hedge funds that do not borrow • With this reform, all commercial bank lending  to government 40
  • Don’t Increase Tax Rates • European hours per working‐age person 70% of  other advanced industrial countries • Why? Their marginal effective tax rate is 60%  versus 40% elsewhere • In early 1970s tax rate was 40% and they  worked the same amount 41
  • • European hours per working‐age person 70% of  other advanced industrial countries • Why? Their marginal effective tax rate is 60%  versus 40% elsewhere • In early 1970s tax rate was 40% and they  worked the same amount • Danger: U.S. will increase its tax rate 42
  • Raising Tax Rates Will • Not increase revenue in the U.S. • Will decrease revenue in France, Italy,  Germany, and Spain 43
  • 44
  • Welfare • Because of taxes, the value of time on  margin is twice as high as in the  market sector as outside market sector • Nonmarket time is valuable • Welfare gains lifetime consumption  equivalents per year are … 45
  • 46
  • What Matters Are Real Factors • Tax RATES – low rates good • Openness – more is better • Productivity – higher is better • Problem is not lack of borrowing • Some banks are refusing deposits in the U.S. 47
  • Poor Prospects for U.S. Productivity Growth: Why? • Recent abandonment of cost‐benefit analysis  for evaluation of new regulations • Government ownership of auto and banks • Congress and the White House management of  businesses 48
  • Are We in for Another Great Depression? • The current planned policies in U.S. resemble  those followed in 1929‐32 – Anti immigration – Anti globalization – Pro tax increase – Pro White House managing the economy – Pro bailout of businesses – Pro cartelization 49
  • I Expect Not • Things were going well for the U.S. economy  until the fourth quarter of 2008 – rapid  productivity growth • Economic knowledge has advanced so much that  it will effectively constrain the  policymakers • But, I fear a lost decade of growth for the  U.S. because of tax rate increases and low  productivity growth 50