Counter arguments

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Argumentative writing is alive and well, especially with the introduction of the ELA Common Core Standards. While students were once focused on persuading others to see their viewpoint, they are now expected to add counterclaims into their writing. This can be a bit difficult for the emerging middle school student. This PowerPoint provides insight into what counterarguments are and how they can provide depth and insight into persuasive issues. There are numerous examples provides to allow students to see how the inclusion of counter arguments or counterclaims does not have to distract from one’s true opinion.

© www.edgalaxy.com – Cool Stuff for Nerdy Teachers

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Counter arguments

  1. 1. Building the “Argument” in Your Argumentative Writing www.edgalaxy.com - Cool Stuff for Nerdy Teachers
  2. 2. What makes an argument – an argument?  Two people (or more) that have opposing viewpoints on a subject.  Please note that this is not a „heated argument‟ where angry words will be spoken.  This part of your argumentative writing is just a place to acknowledge that there is an alternate or opposing side and consider what their “take” might be on your arguments. www.edgalaxy.com - Cool Stuff for Nerdy Teachers
  3. 3. Considering What The Other Side Has to Say  Good writers can acknowledge that what they are trying to say isn‟t the only viewpoint.  You will consider one detail for each of your main ideas and think about what the opposing side would have to say in response to this.  This big question that you are trying to figure out is: how will the readers that feel differently than me respond to this? What can I say back to them to make my argument clearer? www.edgalaxy.com - Cool Stuff for Nerdy Teachers
  4. 4. Let‟s Practice - Counter Arguments:  If you are making the case that cell phones in classrooms are disruptive because they will constantly be ringing…  How might someone who is FOR cell phones in classrooms respond to this?  What might YOU say back to them? www.edgalaxy.com - Cool Stuff for Nerdy Teachers
  5. 5. Let‟s Practice – Counter Arguments  If you are making the case that cell phones in classrooms are beneficial because students have instant access to research…  How might someone who is AGAINST cell phones in classrooms respond to this?  What might YOU say back to them? www.edgalaxy.com - Cool Stuff for Nerdy Teachers
  6. 6. COUNTER ARGUMENT EXAMPLE:  Your detail: Schools are choosing to allow cell phones because they realize that they will never have enough money to buy enough computers.  Counter argument: some students won‟t be able to afford cell phones either, so the problem continues  Your reply: Those that have them will be able to use them, which will provide more access to computers for those that do not have cell phones. www.edgalaxy.com - Cool Stuff for Nerdy Teachers
  7. 7. COUNTER ARGUMENT EXAMPLE:  Your detail: Cell phones will be ring in class and cause classroom disruptions.  Counter argument: : Some students are already “illegally” using cell phones in classes and they don‟t ring out and cause disturbances.  Your reply: : I understand that some students are already using cell phones in class without permission, but because they know that they are breaking the rules, they are more careful. The problem of classroom disruptions will escalate if students are freely allowed to have their cell phones in class because they won‟t feel like they are breaking the rules if it rings. www.edgalaxy.com - Cool Stuff for Nerdy Teachers
  8. 8. Remember…  Your objective is to find four details (not main ideas) that you think someone of an alternate or opposing viewpoint would have a response to.  Try to anticipate their response and how you would reply to make your argumentative case stronger.  You will need to maintain a formal, polite tone. www.edgalaxy.com - Cool Stuff for Nerdy Teachers

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