SpiderBites
Learning Points Understanding of common Aust spiders. Recognition of common clinical presentation, &ED management. High...
Spider’s Australia is home to 1000’s of different spiders. The big two are: Red Back and Funnel Web. White tail gets bl...
Spider BitesCan be broken into 3 groups:1. Big Black spider’s – suspect funnel-web!2. Redback spiders – look for clinical ...
Aussie Spiders!
Red Back Spider
Redback Spider RBS most common envenoming is Aust. 5-10 000each year. Clinical features distressing – but not lifethreat...
Consider RBSChildren: Inconsolable crying Acute abdomen Priapism
Clinical PresentationIsbister, G. (2006). Spider bite: a current approach to management. Aust Prescriber. 29(6), 156-149.
Redback Spider Beware of atypical presentations Ongoing symptoms weeks-months considerpsych!
Emergency DepartmentManagement.Pre-hospital: Reassure, ICE-pack, simple analgesia.In ED:2 approaches: Provide analgesia/...
Funnel-web spider
Funnel-web spider Most dangerous spider in Australia. Comprise 40 species in 2 genera. Big black spider bite = FWS bite...
Clinical Presentation Hx of being bitten by big black spider with fangs.Localised: Severe bite site pain with fang marks...
Emergency DepartmentManagement.Pre-hospital: Apply PIB- T/F to hospital that has antivenom.In ED: Manage in Resus area –...
White Tail Spider
White-tailed spider Common spider found around Australia. Often blamed for causing necrotic arachnidism. Venom has show...
Clinical PresentationLocalised: Painful bite3 local reaction can occur:1. Severe local pain <2 hours duration2. Local pai...
Differential Diagnosis! Infection Diabetic ulcer Pyoderma gangrenosum Squamous cell carcinoma Erythema nodosum Chemi...
Emergency DepartmentManagement. Look for other causes and treat them. Diabetic ulcers Infections (MRSA) Simple analges...
Questions
Take Home Points Patient’s with signs of envenoming shouldn’t beD/C at night. Antivenom carries risk and reactions. Con...
Thank-you
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Managing Spider Bites in the ED

1,113 views

Published on

Presentation on managing common Australian spider bites in the Emergency Department

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,113
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
34
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Managing Spider Bites in the ED

  1. 1. SpiderBites
  2. 2. Learning Points Understanding of common Aust spiders. Recognition of common clinical presentation, &ED management. Highlight some common misinformation aboutspider bites.
  3. 3. Spider’s Australia is home to 1000’s of different spiders. The big two are: Red Back and Funnel Web. White tail gets blamed for everything. Majority of spider bites cause localised symptomsonly.
  4. 4. Spider BitesCan be broken into 3 groups:1. Big Black spider’s – suspect funnel-web!2. Redback spiders – look for clinical effect.3. All other spiders - generally minor effects.
  5. 5. Aussie Spiders!
  6. 6. Red Back Spider
  7. 7. Redback Spider RBS most common envenoming is Aust. 5-10 000each year. Clinical features distressing – but not lifethreatening. RBS live in dry-dark areas. Peak bite season January – April. The women are the problem!
  8. 8. Consider RBSChildren: Inconsolable crying Acute abdomen Priapism
  9. 9. Clinical PresentationIsbister, G. (2006). Spider bite: a current approach to management. Aust Prescriber. 29(6), 156-149.
  10. 10. Redback Spider Beware of atypical presentations Ongoing symptoms weeks-months considerpsych!
  11. 11. Emergency DepartmentManagement.Pre-hospital: Reassure, ICE-pack, simple analgesia.In ED:2 approaches: Provide analgesia/antimetics – if Sx resolve D/C. Antivenom: 2 x 500units of CSL RBS iv over 30min. (monitor forreactions). Rpt if Sx not improved after 2 hours.Antivenom effectiveness currently being studied. (RAVE2)
  12. 12. Funnel-web spider
  13. 13. Funnel-web spider Most dangerous spider in Australia. Comprise 40 species in 2 genera. Big black spider bite = FWS bite until patient hasbeen observed for 4/24. Found in QLD and NSW. The males are the problem
  14. 14. Clinical Presentation Hx of being bitten by big black spider with fangs.Localised: Severe bite site pain with fang marks. Local erythema & swelling are NOT present.Systemic: General: agitation, vomiting, headache, abdo pain. Autonomic: sweating, salivation, piloerection, lacrimation. Cardio: HT, tachycardia, hypotension, bradycardia, APO. Neuro: muscular fasciculations or spasm, coma.Children: Sudden severe illness with inconsolable crying, salivation, vomiting or collapse.
  15. 15. Emergency DepartmentManagement.Pre-hospital: Apply PIB- T/F to hospital that has antivenom.In ED: Manage in Resus area – full monitoring! Look out for– resp failure, hypo/hypertension, APO, &coma. Antivenom: give 2 x 125units of CSL Funnel-web SpiderAntivenom – RPT if needed. Cardiac arrest: Give 4 ampoules undiluted antivenom.
  16. 16. White Tail Spider
  17. 17. White-tailed spider Common spider found around Australia. Often blamed for causing necrotic arachnidism. Venom has shown NO definitive toxiccomponents.
  18. 18. Clinical PresentationLocalised: Painful bite3 local reaction can occur:1. Severe local pain <2 hours duration2. Local pain & a red mark lasting <24hours.3. Persistent & painful red lesion, which does not breakdown or ulcerate – may last 5-12 days. Other features of nausea, malaise, vomiting &headache may occur. Delayed puritus can occur in up to 20% of cases.
  19. 19. Differential Diagnosis! Infection Diabetic ulcer Pyoderma gangrenosum Squamous cell carcinoma Erythema nodosum Chemical burn Localised vasculitis Factitious injury Traumatic.
  20. 20. Emergency DepartmentManagement. Look for other causes and treat them. Diabetic ulcers Infections (MRSA) Simple analgesia/antiemetic if required. Provide reassurance and education!
  21. 21. Questions
  22. 22. Take Home Points Patient’s with signs of envenoming shouldn’t beD/C at night. Antivenom carries risk and reactions. Consider analgesia first in RBS. Look for other cause before blaming the whitetail!
  23. 23. Thank-you

×