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Usability<br />Darwin Web Standards <br />9 June 2011<br />
Usability<br />The ISO defines usability as <br />"The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve...
Usability<br />The ISO defines usability as <br />"The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve...
Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability...
Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability...
Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability...
Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability...
Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability...
Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability...
Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability...
Jakob Nielsen<br />http://www.useit.com<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are t...
Efficiency: Once users have learned the design, how quickly can they perform tasks?
Memorability: When users return to the design after a period of not using it, how easily can they reestablish proficiency?
Errors: How many errors do users make, how severe are these errors, and how easily can they recover from the errors?
Satisfaction: How pleasant is it to use the design? </li></li></ul><li>Usability vs Accessibility<br />
I don’t care about accessibility<br />When you design for the Web -- that is, when you design exclusively and specifically...
They know and expect how their pages will work across operating systems and on different hardware platforms.
Their designs are explicitly intended to work in what we call the spectrum of degradability -- that is, consider the curre...
Don’t Make Me Think<br />
Don’t Make Me Think<br /><ul><li>Walks the talk
Is readable in about 2 hours (a medium plane flight)
Aimed at managers, readable by everyone</li></li></ul><li>Don’t Make Me Think<br />Key Themes<br /><ul><li>When you're cre...
We don't read pages. We scan them.
Create a clear visual hierarchy.  One of the best ways to make a page easy to grasp in a hurry is to make sure that the ap...
Usability Testing</li></li></ul><li>Don’t Make Me Think<br />
Don’t Make Me Think<br />
Don’t Make Me Think<br />
Don’t Make Me Think<br />Omit Needless Words<br />
Don’t Make Me Think<br />
Don’t Make Me Think<br />
Don’t Make Me Think<br />
So…..?<br /><ul><li>Define user profiles (personas)</li></ul>Who is coming to your site?<br />What are they trying to achi...
Letting Go of the Words<br /><ul><li>More in-depth
Aimed at web managers, developers
Define
Goals of the site
Key site users
Direct the content towards the users</li></ul>Redish has done her homework and created a thorough overview of the issues i...
Letting Go of the Words<br />List your major audiences<br />Gather information about your audiences<br />List major charac...
Ginny Redish – 7 Steps<br />List your major audiences<br /><ul><li>Patients, health care professionals, researchers
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Usability by Ian Symonds

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Transcript of "Usability by Ian Symonds"

  1. 1. Usability<br />Darwin Web Standards <br />9 June 2011<br />
  2. 2. Usability<br />The ISO defines usability as <br />"The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction in a specified context of use.”<br />Wikipedia<br />
  3. 3. Usability<br />The ISO defines usability as <br />"The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction in a specified context of use.”<br />Wikipedia<br />ISO 9241. Ergonomics of Human System Interaction<br />A multi-part standard from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), covering aspects of people working with computers. <br />Originally titled Ergonomic requirements for office work with visual display terminals (VDTs).<br />
  4. 4. Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability" also refers to methods for improving ease-of-use during the design process. <br />
  5. 5. Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability" also refers to methods for improving ease-of-use during the design process. <br />Usability is defined by five quality components: <br />http://www.useit.com<br />
  6. 6. Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability" also refers to methods for improving ease-of-use during the design process. <br />Usability is defined by five quality components: <br />Learnability<br />http://www.useit.com<br />How easy is it for users to accomplish basic tasks the first time they encounter the design? <br />
  7. 7. Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability" also refers to methods for improving ease-of-use during the design process. <br />Usability is defined by five quality components: <br />Learnability<br />Efficiency<br />http://www.useit.com<br />Once users have learned the design, how quickly can they perform tasks?<br />
  8. 8. Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability" also refers to methods for improving ease-of-use during the design process. <br />Usability is defined by five quality components: <br />Learnability<br />Efficiency<br />Memorability<br />http://www.useit.com<br />When users return to the design after a period of not using it, how easily can they reestablish proficiency? <br />
  9. 9. Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability" also refers to methods for improving ease-of-use during the design process. <br />Usability is defined by five quality components: <br />Learnability<br />Efficiency<br />Memorability<br />Errors<br />http://www.useit.com<br />How many errors do users make, how severe are these errors, and how easily can they recover from the errors? <br />
  10. 10. Jakob Nielsen<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability" also refers to methods for improving ease-of-use during the design process. <br />Usability is defined by five quality components: <br />Learnability<br />Efficiency<br />Memorability<br />Errors<br />Satisfaction<br />http://www.useit.com<br />How pleasant is it to use the design?<br />
  11. 11. Jakob Nielsen<br />http://www.useit.com<br />Usability is a quality attribute that assesses how easy user interfaces are to use. The word "usability" also refers to methods for improving ease-of-use during the design process. <br />Usability is defined by five quality components: <br /><ul><li>Learnability: How easy is it for users to accomplish basic tasks the first time they encounter the design?
  12. 12. Efficiency: Once users have learned the design, how quickly can they perform tasks?
  13. 13. Memorability: When users return to the design after a period of not using it, how easily can they reestablish proficiency?
  14. 14. Errors: How many errors do users make, how severe are these errors, and how easily can they recover from the errors?
  15. 15. Satisfaction: How pleasant is it to use the design? </li></li></ul><li>Usability vs Accessibility<br />
  16. 16. I don’t care about accessibility<br />When you design for the Web -- that is, when you design exclusively and specifically for this medium -- when you do that natively, so many of the things we consider problems just start to fall away. <br />I've seen that the designers I'm working with have little trouble with the so-called constraints of today's Web<br /><ul><li>They take for granted that their pages must perform quickly in a wide variety of bandwidth situations.
  17. 17. They know and expect how their pages will work across operating systems and on different hardware platforms.
  18. 18. Their designs are explicitly intended to work in what we call the spectrum of degradability -- that is, consider the current Mozilla in the middle, with less advanced and broken browsers like Blazer, Netscape 4 and IE6 on one end, and more advanced browsers like OmniWeb, screen readers, and other accessibility devices on the other. </li></ul>Jeffrey Veen<br />http://www.veen.com/jeff/archives/000503.html<br />
  19. 19. Don’t Make Me Think<br />
  20. 20. Don’t Make Me Think<br /><ul><li>Walks the talk
  21. 21. Is readable in about 2 hours (a medium plane flight)
  22. 22. Aimed at managers, readable by everyone</li></li></ul><li>Don’t Make Me Think<br />Key Themes<br /><ul><li>When you're creating a site, your job is to get rid of the question marks.
  23. 23. We don't read pages. We scan them.
  24. 24. Create a clear visual hierarchy. One of the best ways to make a page easy to grasp in a hurry is to make sure that the appearance of the things on the page -- all of the visual cues -- clearly and accurately portray the relationships between the things on the page.
  25. 25. Usability Testing</li></li></ul><li>Don’t Make Me Think<br />
  26. 26. Don’t Make Me Think<br />
  27. 27. Don’t Make Me Think<br />
  28. 28. Don’t Make Me Think<br />Omit Needless Words<br />
  29. 29. Don’t Make Me Think<br />
  30. 30. Don’t Make Me Think<br />
  31. 31. Don’t Make Me Think<br />
  32. 32. So…..?<br /><ul><li>Define user profiles (personas)</li></ul>Who is coming to your site?<br />What are they trying to achieve?<br />What is their skill level?<br />Design and develop for that audience<br /><ul><li>Keep your terminology simple</li></ul>Really simple<br />And familiar<br />Use established conventions <br />Make links easily identifiable<br />Links are links (they go places)<br />Buttons are buttons (they do stuff)<br />Put error messages next to where they occur, (and as soon as possible)<br />
  33. 33. Letting Go of the Words<br /><ul><li>More in-depth
  34. 34. Aimed at web managers, developers
  35. 35. Define
  36. 36. Goals of the site
  37. 37. Key site users
  38. 38. Direct the content towards the users</li></ul>Redish has done her homework and created a thorough overview of the issues in writing for the Web. Ironically, I must recommend that you read her every word so that you can find out why your customers won't read very many words on your website -- and what to do about it ; -- Jakob Nielsen<br />
  39. 39. Letting Go of the Words<br />List your major audiences<br />Gather information about your audiences<br />List major characteristics for each audience<br />Gather your audiences’ questions, tasks and stories<br />Use the information to create personas<br />Include the persona’s goals and tasks<br />Use this information to write scenarios for the site<br />
  40. 40. Ginny Redish – 7 Steps<br />List your major audiences<br /><ul><li>Patients, health care professionals, researchers
  41. 41. Parents, teachers, students</li></ul>Gather information about your audiences<br /><ul><li>Patients, health care professionals, researchers
  42. 42. Parents, teachers, students
  43. 43. Tourists (local), Prospective Tourists (interstate), Prospective Tourists (international)</li></ul>List major characteristics for each audience<br /><ul><li>Consider expertise with using the web & technology
  44. 44. Consider expertise with your subject matter</li></ul>Gather your audiences’ questions, tasks and stories<br />Use the information to create personas<br />http://www.usability.gov/methods/analyze_current/personas.html<br />Include the persona’s goals and tasks<br />Use this information to write scenarios for the site<br /><ul><li>Find accommodation near Hidden Valley
  45. 45. Find a caravan park
  46. 46. Find schools near Durack for my 6, and 11 year-old children, including music studies and bus information</li></li></ul><li>Every persona must be catered for.<br />Every scenario must be achievable from the home page.<br />
  47. 47. Key Tasks<br /><ul><li>People want to start key tasks right away
  48. 48. Often these involve forms
  49. 49. Put the forms people want right away on the home page
  50. 50. Airline,
  51. 51. Accommodation
  52. 52. Real estate
  53. 53. Rental cars
  54. 54. Speak in the vernacular of your site visitors
  55. 55. Avoid using cute, or made-up words
  56. 56. Provide meaningful links</li></li></ul><li>Usability Testing<br />
  57. 57. Usability Testing<br />(It’s not) focus group testing<br /><ul><li>Focus group react to designs and ideas that are shown to them
  58. 58. Value comes from participants reacting to each other</li></ul>Usability testing<br /><ul><li>Individual tests
  59. 59. Tries to achieve set objectives
  60. 60. May be done on a partially complete site (even sketches) </li></ul>Jakob Nielsen and Tom Landauer: testing five users will uncover about 85% of a site’s usability problems, and that there’s a serious case of diminishing returns for additional users. <br />http://www.useit.com/alertbox/20000319.html<br />
  61. 61. Usability Testing<br /><ul><li>There’s companies that specialise in Usability testing
  62. 62. http://www.usertesting.com/
  63. 63. http://www.usabilityfirst.com/
  64. 64. Or you can do it yourself
  65. 65. Three or four people (per test)
  66. 66. Neighbour, colleague, relative
  67. 67. No need for a special lab
  68. 68. It’s important to re-run usability tests
  69. 69. You can’t test it yourself – you’re too close to the site</li></li></ul><li>Usability Testing<br /><ul><li>Doesn’t need to be a big deal</li></ul>Choose a representative audience type<br />Chose a site key task<br />Book accommodation for a date<br />Buy a book<br />Find how to catch a bus to the V8’s<br /><ul><li>Observe them performing that task</li></ul>How do they discover what to do?<br />Do they find it easy?<br />Do they make errors?<br />How do they recover from errors<br />
  70. 70.
  71. 71. Stupidly cool iPad Synthesizer App<br />
  72. 72. Stupidly cool iPad Synthesizer App<br />Skeuomorphic Design<br />
  73. 73. Visualising blood tests<br />
  74. 74. Visualising blood tests<br />
  75. 75. Discussion<br />
  76. 76. Links<br />http://www.usabilityfirst.com/<br />http://www.usability.gov/<br />http://www.jungleminds.com/publications/articles/effective_usability_testing_for_intranet<br />
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