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Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
Kidogo Final Presentation
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Kidogo Final Presentation

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  • 1. © Sabrina Premji 2013 Our Story
  • 2. Sadaf Shallwani Our Team Brad Rosenberg John McKinley Our Advisors Co-Founders & Leadership Management Team Afzal Habib Sabrina Premji Kenzie Colgan Adam Camenzuli Michaela Mantel
  • 3. The Problem • Limited child-care options in urban slums – Unsupervised at home or work – Low quality & unsafe "baby cares" • Continued "cycle of poverty" – Child's health/education compromised – Mothers unable to gain employment The Opportunity Our Idea . . . • New & improved ECD centres – Build / refurbish high-quality facilities – Trained caregivers & care standards • Empower families & change trajectories – Improved health & education of child – Unlock employment opportunities
  • 4. Estimated market size in Kenya>$150M with potential to scale 4X across East Africa . . . with Potential Total Available Market • # of Children (0-5 years) in Sub-Saharan Africa Served Available Market • # of Children in East African1 urban slums Target Market • # of Children in Kenya's urban slums • Estimated market size2 = $150 M+ 130 Million 2.5 Million >650 Thousand 1. East Africa defined as those countries that are part of the EAC: Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda & Burundi 2. Assuming target price = $1 / day / child and 250 working days per calendar year Sources: Homeless International, Africa's Future Africa's Challenge, Index Mundi, Population Reference Bureau, Customer Interviews Rwanda Burundi Tanzania KenyaUganda Based in: Nairobi Region: East Africa
  • 5. +Acumen Lean 4 Social Impact Course We've been doing 6 months of customer discovery Hypotheses: Where we started Findings: What we learned Progress: Where we are Next Steps: Where we are going Experiments: What we did
  • 6. Hypotheses: Where we started Solution (product features) Problem Value Proposition Pain Reliever Gain Creator "I'm so relieved" – I have a SAFE place to keep my kids "I'm so proud" – My kids go to the BEST pre-school in town "It's affordable" – I can AFFORD to pay for it
  • 7. Kibera Partner Org: Care for Kenya Local Contact: Daleela Mlolongo Partner Org: Mother Child in Action Local Contact: Racheal Experiments: What we did Comprehensive benchmarking study 75+ Interviews (experts, customers, etc.) 3+ Site Visits / Focus Groups Baba Dogo Partner Org: We Are Watching You Local Contact: Ramadhan
  • 8. Findings: What We've Learned • Significant variance in child care options in slum communities, from none available (Kibera/Baba Dogo) to poor-quality (Mlolongo) • There is significant demand from mothers for a safe, affordable and convenient place to keep their children during the day • Provision of food is a huge 'value add' in attracting mothers to one babycare centre over another. Willingness to pay increases (>2x) • We can partner with local employers and NGOs serving the same target market (mothers in slums) to build our customer base • Need to focus on highest value interventions in order to maximize ECD impact, "pull" customers, and achieve financial sustainability 1 2 3 4 5
  • 9. Findings: Customer Archetypes "Tell me about yourself" • Georginah, 26 years old • Occupation: Washes clothes. Earns US$2.30/day • Typical Day: Wakes up at 5am; Cooks breakfast and feeds child; Walks door-to-door to find work; Returns home at 3pm; Washes her baby and clothes; Cooks supper; Sleeps at 9pm. Child Care – No Child Care Services • Children: 1 year old • Pains: Difficult to work with a child on her back. Child often gets pneumonia while being carried during the rainy season. • Dreams: Her child is healthy and happy. "Tell me about yourself" • Lucy, 28 years old • Occupation: Tailor. Earns US$3.50/day • Typical Day: Wakes up at 4:30am; Cooks breakfast; Feeds and dresses baby and takes to baby-care centre; Returns at 7pm; Cooks supper; Washes her baby and clothes; Sleeps at 11pm. Child Care – Baby Care Centre • 2 Children: Ages 5 yrs and 1yr • Uses local baby care: Pays US$0.60/day, no food provided • Pains: Dirty, congested; Limited play materials; No place to warm food; Mistreating/shouting at babies • Dreams: Her children are healthy and happy 1 2
  • 10. Progress: Where we are now Potential MVP / pilot site identified in partnership with local NGO • Basic facility renovations and expansion underway (landlord funded) • Child-friendly retrofit to be completed by Kidogo team • Must recruit and train first batch of caregivers in ECD essentials • Gaining support for curriculum development and daily schedules • Marketing materials (posters, signage, etc.) Target timeframe: 6 Months (December Opening)
  • 11. Next Steps: What we plan to do next Launching fundraising campaign (including online / social media presence) to fund pilot Twitter: @kidogo_ECD Facebook: "Kidogo Early Years" Website: www.kidogo.co
  • 12. Current options for "baby care", where they exist in slum, are low quality: • poor facilities • untrained care-givers • limited access to essential services: food, health care, education Kidogo ECCs have three major components that make them different: 1) High-quality facilities 2) Well trained care-givers 3) Access to nutritious meals, health care, and educational materials Poor (BOP) Mothers: • Women (18-55) with young children (0-5) • Live in urban slum dwelling • Have hourly wage factory job or run a small business • Make only a few dollars / day • May or may not already send children to baby care • Limited education/ literacy Major employers: • Local processing factories • Many local employees incl. women w/ children •Looking for CSR ideas to "give back" or "engage community" Franchisees: In some communities, we will work with existing "baby care centers" owned and operated by local mamas • We will provide facility upgrade, training and other services Local NGOs: Work alongside local non- profits serving mothers & children • Market our services, identify customers and run training programs Local & intl' universities: Help us build curriculum & train caregivers in exchange for opportunity to conduct research/ train ECD students Kidogo is a service provider. 1) Provide support to our franchised centres through branding, training & supervision 2) Provide care / education to customers directly in our owned centers Financial Capital: Required to build new centers or improve existing Human Capital: - Corps of "mama-preneurs" to be owner/operators - Team of professionals to develop curriculum, provide ongoing care-giver support 1) Franchise existing centers Leverage existing centers with est. customer base 2) Build referral system Incentives for parents / CHW Micro-franchised center: Locally owned/operated with 15-30 children, close to home, home-based care. Mega-centers: Purpose-built, company owned, with >50 children, located near work or market • Facility upgrades / retrofits • Caregiver training • Meals (ingredients, preparation, delivery) • Overhead support • Curriculum / program development • Health care Micro-franchised centers: • Franchisees pay Kidogo monthly franchisee fee (or revenue share) • Supplier of key inputs (food, materials, water etc.) Mega-centers: • Mama's pay Kidogo daily or monthly day-care fees directly; OR • Employers pay Kidogo to care for children of their employees (vouchers) Appendix: Business Model Canvas (I)
  • 13. Current options for "baby care", where they exist in slum, are low quality: • poor facilities • untrained care-givers • limited access to essential services: food, health care, education Kidogo ECCs have three major components that make them different: 1) High-quality facilities 2) Well trained care-givers 3) Access to nutritious meals, health care, and educational materials But, value proposition is: • Child safety • Affordability • Status: Beautiful centers that parents aspire to send their children to Poor (BOP) Mothers: • Women (18-55) with young children (0-5) • Live in urban slum dwelling • Have hourly wage factory job or run a small business • Make only a few dollars / day - unpredictable income • May or may not already send children to baby care • Limited education/ literacy Major employers: • Local processing factories • Many local employees incl. women w/ children • May already or consider offering baby-care services as a benefit to employees • Looking for CSR ideas to "give back" or "engage community" Franchisees: In some communities, we will work with existing "baby care centers" owned and operated by local mamas • We will provide facility upgrade, training and other services Local NGOs: Work alongside local non- profits serving mothers & children • Market our services, identify customers and run training programs Local & intl' universities: Help us build curriculum & train caregivers in exchange for opportunity to conduct research/ train ECD students Kidogo is a service provider. 1) Provide support to our franchised centres through branding, training & supervision 2) Provide care / education to customers directly in our owned centers Financial Capital: Required to build new centers or improve existing Human Capital: - Corps of "mama-preneurs" to be owner/operators - Team of professionals to develop curriculum, provide ongoing care-giver support 1) Franchise existing centers Leverage existing centers with est. customer base 2) Partner with local NGOs Work with mothers groups, clinics to market to new mothers & unserved 3) Build referral system Incentives for parents / CHW Micro-franchised center: Locally owned/operated with 15-30 children, close to home, home-based care. Mega-centers: Purpose-built, company owned, with >50 children, located near work or market • Facility upgrades / retrofits • Caregiver training • Meals (ingredients, preparation, delivery) • Overhead support • Curriculum / program development • Health care Micro-franchised centers: • Franchisees pay Kidogo monthly franchisee fee (or revenue share) • Supplier of key inputs (food, materials, water etc.) Mega-centers: • Mama's pay Kidogo daily or monthly day-care fees directly; OR • Employers pay Kidogo to care for children of their employees (vouchers) Appendix: Business Model Canvas (II)
  • 14. Current Baby Care options in slum, are low quality: • poor facilities • untrained care-givers • limited access to essential services: food, health, edu. Kidogo ECCs features make them different: 1) High-quality facilities 2) Well trained care-givers 3) Nutritious meals, health care & education Value proposition is: • Child safety • Affordability • Status: Beautiful centers that parents aspire to (for franchisees) • Increased profitability • Status: "Formal School" affiliation Poor (BOP) Mothers: • Women (18-55) with young children (0-5) • Live in urban slum dwelling • Have hourly wage factory job or run a small business • Make only a few dollars / day - unpredictable income • May or may not already send children to baby care • Limited education/ literacy Major employers: • Local processing factories • Many local employees incl. women w/ children • May already or consider offering baby-care services as a benefit to employees • Looking for CSR ideas to "give back" or "engage community" Franchisees: In some communities, we will work with existing "baby care centers" owned and operated by local mamas • We will provide facility upgrade, training and other services Local NGOs: Work alongside local non- profits serving mothers & children • Market our services, identify customers and run training programs Local & intl' universities: Help us build curriculum & train caregivers in exchange for opportunity to conduct research/ train ECD students Kidogo is a service provider. 1) Provide support to our franchised centres through branding, training & supervision 2) Provide care / education to customers directly in our owned centers Financial Capital: Required to build new centers or improve existing Human Capital: - Corps of "mama-preneurs" to be owner/operators - Team of professionals to develop curriculum, provide ongoing care-giver support 1) Franchise existing centers Leverage existing centers with est. customer base 2) Partner with local NGOs Work with mothers groups, clinics to market to new mothers & unserved 3) Build referral system Incentives for parents / CHW Micro-franchised center: Locally owned/operated with 15-30 children, close to home, home-based care. Mega-centers: Purpose-built, company owned, with >50 children, located near work or market • Facility upgrades / retrofits • Caregiver training • Meals (ingredients, preparation, delivery) • Overhead support • Curriculum / program development • Health care Micro-franchised centers: • Franchisees pay Kidogo monthly franchisee fee (or revenue share) • Supplier of key inputs (food, materials, water etc.) Mega-centers: • Mama's pay Kidogo daily or monthly day-care fees directly; OR • Employers pay Kidogo to care for children of their employees (vouchers) Appendix: Business Model Canvas (III) Pivot: For the franchising model to work, we need to be thinking of franchisees as customers (needs, economics, values), not just as partners.
  • 15. Current Baby Care options in slum, are low quality: • poor facilities • untrained care-givers • limited access to essential services: food, health, edu. Kidogo ECCs features make them different: 1) High-quality facilities 2) Well trained care-givers 3) Nutritious meals, health care & education Value proposition is: • Child safety • Affordability • Status: Beautiful centers that parents aspire to Value prop. (franchisees): • Increased profitability • Status: "Formal School", affiliation, ECD certificate Poor (BOP) Mothers: • Women with young children (0-5); live in slums • Have hourly wage factory job or run a small business • Make only a few dollars / day - unpredictable income • May or may not already send children to baby care Franchisees: Existing "baby care centers" owned and operated by local mamas . We will provide facility upgrades, training, marketing, play materials, and ongoing support Major employers: • Local processing factories who employ mothers • May already or consider offering baby-care services • Looking for CSR ideas to "give back" to community Local NGOs: Work alongside local non- profits serving mothers & children • Market our services, identify customers and run training programs Local & intl' universities: Help us build curriculum & train caregivers in exchange for opportunity to conduct research/ train ECD students Kidogo is a service provider. 1) Provide support to our franchised centres through branding, training & supervision 2) Provide care / education to customers directly in our owned centers Financial Capital: Required to build new centers or improve existing Human Capital: - Corps of "mama-preneurs" to be owner/operators - Team of professionals to develop curriculum, provide ongoing care-giver support 1) Franchise existing centers Leverage existing centers with est. customer base 2) Recruit new franchisees Offer franchising package to potential owners 3) Partner with local NGOs Work with comm. groups, o market to new mothers 4) Build referral system Incentives for parents / CHW Micro-franchised center: Locally owned/operated with 15-30 children, close to home, home-based care. Mega-centers: Purpose-built, company owned, with >50 children, located near work or market • Facility upgrades / retrofits • Caregiver training • Meals (ingredients, preparation, delivery) • Overhead support • Curriculum / program development • Health care Micro-franchised centers: • Franchisees pay Kidogo monthly franchisee fee (or revenue share) • Supplier of key inputs (food, materials, water etc.) Mega-centers: • Mama's pay Kidogo daily or monthly day-care fees directly; OR • Employers pay Kidogo to care for children of their employees (vouchers) Appendix: Business Model Canvas (IV)
  • 16. Current Baby Care options in slum, are low quality: • poor facilities • untrained care-givers • limited access to essential services: food, health, edu. Kidogo ECCs features make them different: 1) High-quality facilities 2) Well trained care-givers 3) Nutritious meals, health care & education Value proposition is: • Child safety • Affordability • Status: Beautiful centers that parents aspire to (for franchisees) • Increased profitability • Status: ECD certificate, "Formal School", affiliation Poor (BOP) Mothers: • Women (18-55) with young children (0-5) • Live in urban slum dwelling • Have hourly wage factory job, no job, or a small biz •Unpredictable income >$4 • May or may not already send children to baby care • Limited education/ literacy Major employers: • Local processing factories • Many female employees • May consider offering baby-care as a benefit • Looking to "give back" or "engage community" Franchisees: • Young-middle age women • Existing "baby care centers" owner/operators • Serve 15-30 families today • Some are ECD trained Local NGOs: Work alongside local non- profits serving mothers & children • Market our services, identify customers and run training programs • e.g., Mother Child in Action, Care 4 Kenya Local & int'l universities: Help us build curriculum & train caregivers in exchange for opportunity to conduct research/ train ECD students • e.g., Aga Khan University, UofT, Harvard Centre for the Developing Child Kidogo is a service provider. (1) Provide care / education to customers directly in our owned centers (2) Provide support to franchisees thru facility upgrades, branding, training & supervision Financial Capital: Required to build new centers or improve existing Human Capital: - Corps of "mama-preneurs" to be owner/operators - Team of professionals to develop curriculum, provide ongoing care-giver support 1) Franchise existing centers Leverage existing centers with est. customer base 2) Partner with local NGOs Work with mothers groups, clinics to market to new mothers & unserved 3) Build referral system Incentives for parents / CHW Integrated Community center "Mega-center": Purpose-built, company owned, with 30-50 children, located near work or market partner organization. Micro-franchise: Locally owned/operated with 15-30 children, close to home, home-based care. • Facility upgrades / retrofits • Caregiver training • Meals (ingredients, preparation, delivery) • Overhead support • Curriculum / program development • Access to health care Mega-centers: • Mama's pay Kidogo daily or monthly day-care fees directly; OR • Employers pay Kidogo to care for children of their employees (vouchers) Micro-franchisee fees: • Franchisees pay Kidogo monthly franchisee fee (or revenue share) • Supplier of key inputs (food, materials, water etc.) Major Pivot: In order to prove concept, refine economics & build our brand, the franchising model will be "shelved" to focus on a "community centre" pilot. Appendix: Business Model Canvas (V)
  • 17. Current Baby Care options in slum, are low quality: • poor facilities • untrained care-givers • limited access to essential services: food, health, education Kidogo ECCs features make them different: 1) High-quality facilities 2) Well trained caregivers 3) Nutritious meals, health care & education Value proposition is: • Child safety • Affordability • Status: Beautiful centers that parents aspire to send their children to Poor (BOP) Mothers: • Women (18-55) with young children (0-5) • Live in urban slum dwelling • Have hourly wage factory job, a small business, or no job •Unpredictable income >$4 • Do not currently send children to baby care • Limited education/ literacy Major employers: • Local processing factories • Many female employees • May consider offering baby-care as a benefit • Looking to "give back" or "engage community" Local NGOs: Work alongside local non- profits serving mothers & children • Market our services, identify customers and run training programs • e.g., Mother Child in Action, Care 4 Kenya Local & int'l universities: Help us build curriculum & support local trainers in exchange for opportunity to conduct research and student field placements • e.g., Aga Khan University, University of Toronto, Harvard Centre for the Developing Child Kidogo is a service provider. (1) Provide care / education to customers directly in our owned centers Financial Capital: - Required to transform existing facility into a babycare centre Human Capital: - Local ECD professional ("mam-preneur") and team of caregivers 1) Partner with local NGOs Work with mothers groups, clinics to market to both new and unserved mothers 2) Build referral system Incentives for parents Integrated Community center Purpose-built, company owned, with 30-50 children, located near work / partner organization. • Facility upgrade / retrofits • Caregiver training • Meals (ingredients, preparation, delivery or outsource) • Overhead support • Curriculum / program development Company-owned, community-based centers: • Mama's pay Kidogo daily or monthly day-care fees directly; OR • Employers pay Kidogo to care for children of their employees (vouchers) Appendix: Business Model Canvas (Current)
  • 18. Appendix: Theory of change 1. Mission "Improve early childhood health & education in East Africa's slums" "Change the trajectory of children in EA slums through improved Early Childhood care" 2. Big idea • Operate a network of branded day care centers built on best-practices in Early Childhood Development 3. Impact(s) • Decrease under5 child mortality/ illness stunting, malnutrition & infection rates • Improved primary school retention & performance (Y1, Y3, Y5) We build "improved" centers • Safer & more stimulating Mothers bring children daily • Switch to a Kidogo center • Start going to a Kidogo center Caregivers give "better" care • Ongoing Training in ECD curriculum • Supervised by Kidogo CHWs Children are safer & get better prepared for school Improved child health & education • Decreased child stunting ... • Improved primary school .... 4. Behavior Map

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