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McNeill 2007 Fractal Frameworks
 

McNeill 2007 Fractal Frameworks

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Fractal Frameworks for Marketing, Branding, Innovation, etc.

Fractal Frameworks for Marketing, Branding, Innovation, etc.

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    McNeill 2007 Fractal Frameworks McNeill 2007 Fractal Frameworks Presentation Transcript

    • Machinima
      • Animation
        • Download Qavimator
        • Install Qavimator
        • Create animation
        • Export animation
        • Import animation
        • Use animation
      • 3d shapes
        • Download Blender
        • Install Blender
        • Create nurb 3d shape
        • Export 3d shape
        • Create 3d graphic wrap
        • Export 3d graphic wrap
        • Import 3d graphics
        • Apply 3d graphics to prim
      • Machinima
        • Video capture tools
          • Set up capture station
        • Scripted camera tools
        • Purchase scripted cameras
        • Microphone
        • Script
        • Casting
        • Storyboard
        • Post-production with CrazyTalk
      • Movement & Gesture
        • Animation
        • Gesture
        • Facial expression
    • Fractal Frameworks
      • Fractal
        • Self-similar structures at every level of a system
        • Fractal is different from hierarchical or subsystems
      • Fractal Organizations
        • Opposite of multi-level marketing/network marketing
      • Fractal Marketing
        • Authenticity is self-same by definition
        • Authentic brands and engaging advertisement must remain on-message and exhibit the same structures
      • Use of the fractal frameworks
        • Tool for analysis of strategies of organizations and their offerings
        • Not all organizations could or should be fractal
    • Resource-based view, strategic positioning, transaction cost Brand extensibility and evolution Relationship marketing, permission marketing, customer acquisition strategy, market share Unique brand personality Brand experience, sensory engagement, appropriate advertising, store design and locations Demographics, psychographics, culture codes, expectations User-driven brands, open-source, feedback, crowdsourcing Brand-Brand Brand-Customers Customers-Brand Customers-Customers Brand-Strategy Strategy-Brand Customers-Strategy Strategy-Strategy Strategy-Customers Brand Customers Strategy Fractal Framework for Marketing McNeill (2007)‏ Brand-based communities, word-of-mouth, buzz marketing Marketing Value proposition, strategy canvas, strategic brand features Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Updated 2007-12-02
    • Is the strategy reflected in the brand experience, sensory engagement, appropriate advertising, store design and locations? Is the strategy represented consistently and is it well-understood? Is the unique and differentiated brand personality represented by the choices made in brand experience, sensory engagement, appropriate advertising, store design and locations? Brand experience, sensory engagement, appropriate advertising, store design and locations Are demographics, psychographics, culture codes, and expectations adequately and appropriately reflected in the brand experience, sensory engagement, appropriate advertising, store design and locations? Brand Brand-Customers Customers Brand-Customers Strategy Brand-Customers Fractal Framework for Marketing McNeill (2007)‏ Brand-Customers Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Updated 2007-12-02 Brand-Customers component magnification
    • What are the basic needs How people feel about their needs What are the needs for ideas and information What are the core feelings and how people feel about their feelings How people feel about their ideas What and how people think, and what people think about their ideas How do people think about their needs Emotions-Emotions Emotions-Ideas Ideas-Emotions Ideas-Ideas Emotions-Needs Needs-Emotions Ideas-Needs Needs-Needs Needs-Ideas Emotions Ideas Needs Fractal Framework for the Triune Brain McNeill (2007)‏ How people think about their emotions Whole Person Marketing What are the emotional needs Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Updated 2007-12-02
    • Extensibility, API, REST, Gdata, patterns, methods, frameworks Standards-compliance, high performance, languages, protocols, HTTP, HTML, XML Data models and formats, transactions, syndication, data-in-use Design insight, modern idioms Usability, user experience, intuitability, adaptability Needs-based requirements, solving latent or manifest needs of importance Data access, portability, security, findability, availability Design-Design Design-Needs Needs-Design Needs-Needs Design-Data Data-Design Needs-Data Data-Data Data-Needs Interface Design User Needs Data Model Fractal Framework for Web Design McNeill (2007)‏ Accessibility, compatibility, learning curve Web Design RSS Updated 2007-12-02 Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Requires empirical analysis Microformats Information architecture, plug-ins, skins
    • Create new resources and new knowledge based on needs and discovery Coordinate needed resources for given skills Curate resources in appropriate ways for learning and transfer Challenge students to develop skills needed in changing environments; develop adaptive capabilities Communicate and network, developing the core habits of ethics and logic in thinking, speaking, reading, writing Cultivate students to become full participants in society and colleagues in education Collaborate with students and colleagues to maintain skills; engage in assigned activities Skills-Skills Students-Skills Skills-Students Students-Students Resources-Skills Skills-Resources Resources-Students Resources-Resources Students-Resources Skills Students Resources Fractal Framework for Education McNeill (2007)‏ Coach individual needs, talents and skills Education Critique and receive criticism in evaluating resources and activities to ensure quality Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Updated 2007-12-28 Critical thinking skills Lectures, lesson plans Information sharing
    • Do employees earn a living wage? Can we make money now and in the future? Are people being paid the same? Are we being efficient with our use of resources? Are people treating others with respect? Are products and services safe for customers and workers? Is it fair to toxify the earth? Are biological systems being supported or destroyed? Does waste = food? Are we making effective use of our resources? Goal of giving back to a sustainable system… equity-equity equity-ecology ecology-equity ecology-ecology equity-economy economy-equity ecology-economy economy-economy economy-ecology Equity Ecology Economy McDonough Fractal Design Derrived from presentation video
    • 5 Screens and their Characteristics Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Some of the differences between the 5 screens are indicated here, and should form basis for expansion. Movement of advertising revenue from T/T to C/H/H as media consumption, small device application functionality and network connectivity expand. The real challenge is how to provide effective brand engagement across the media in a coherent, systematic way. 1080p Projection Resolution None None Contextual, search driven 30-60 seconds for 20% of content 30-120 seconds; usually trailers Advertising Single user Single user One to a few One to a dozen Dozens to 100s Audience Text, increasing graphics support Gaming, audio, video Rich applications and various media 30-60-90-120 minute shows Feature films, 2,500 per year Content Analog pervasive; 3G urban Wifi ad-hoc or no network Dial-up pervasive; broadband urban Local broadcast, cable, satellite No network Network Communication, casual gaming Gaming; media Rich applications; gaming; media Media; game console display Group viewing of 1-2 hour content Use In everyone’s purse or pocket Also embedded in headrests Desktops; laptops Residential living rooms; lobbies Multi-plex theaters Locations 6 – 12 inches 12 – 18 inches 12 – 24 inches 3 – 5 feet Dozens of feet Distance Large growth Growth Growth Decline Static Growth Synchronous voice, async text Multi-user Rich multi-user; collaborative No No Multi-device Small keyboards, touchscreens Buttons, stylus, touchscreens Mouse, keyboard Remote control; joystick Fixed schedule Interface 1.5 – 3.5 inches DS, PSP, iPods 15 – 24 inches 19 – 52 inches Dozens of feet Screen size Handset Handheld Computer Television Theater
    • 5 Screens and their Characteristics Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. O is the opportunity to transform a medium, namely large screens and make them interactive and networked. X is the opportunity to realize a screen along various axes, namely handhelds which are largely non-networked and not used for productivity purposes as much as entertainment. It may be that cell phones will usurp the place of the handheld (e.g. iphone vs. ipod), witness the death of the Newton and the Palm-to-Treo transformation, as well as the struggle to bring to market a useful e-reader. Note, OLPC may be functionally more of a handheld device than a laptop computer. Note also the Microsoft surface computing is the attempt to add an additional screen, namely to the tabletop. X Handset Installed Entertainment Stand-alone Decline Expensive Programmed Scheduled Group Passive Larger Portable Networked X O Individual Ad hoc O Inexpensive Chosen Interactive O Productivity X Growth Smaller Handheld Computer Television Theater
    • Process for Recruitment Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Close the deal. Don’t think of this as a one-time recruitment, set the stage for the future as well. 1-2 days Telephone and in-person Boots on the ground +1 week 1-2 weeks 1-2 months 2-3 months Timeframe Review and identify successes and errors Debriefing Post invasion Visible, legible, informative, but also with design chops to attract attention. Hit the blogs and social networks, but don’t try and “sell” rather “inform”. Posters Armor attack Clear, short, to-the-point. This is the elevator pitch. Who, what, when, where, why, how, how much. Need clear and memorable brand pitch. Email Aerial bombardment Meet with prospective targets and have them help devise the plan (for their own recruitment). The idea is to counter the competition, capture hearts and minds. Consult widely. Call and meet with friends, get the word out. Ask them for people they know – snowball sampling. Meetings Secretive maneuvers Guidelines Equivalent War phase
    • Text Communication Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.
      • The biggest challenge is, confusingly, both not stopping fast enough with information delivery and not spending time enough in clarification/summarization.
      • There is widely inappropriate use of “too-much-text”, as well as overuse (in some cases, underuse) of attachments (e.g., a slide or page when email or IM is sufficient).
      • As well, many books are written when articles would suffice.
      • Effective use of blogs and wikis can do away with many forms of information and communication which previously circulated in closed, proprietary systems.
      • A greater degree of seemless communication comes from the ability to feed email lists and IRC chat into archives and provide chat announcements and rss feeds for wiki changes and blog entries.
      Ask / answer questions Inform and give actionable info Summarize and present to instruct Give background and context Systematic treatment of topic Purpose 1-3 paragraphs 1-3 paragraphs 1-2 pages 6-18 pages 180 pages Length Same as email, but more for ad hoc single user Who, what, when, where, why, how, how much Functional definition and guidelines Conceptual exploration and discussion Treadment of multi-step or multi-part subject Description Don’t create if phone call needed Don’t create if IM will do Don’t create if email will do Don’t create if single page will do Don’t create if an article will do Necessity Hey d00d, ttyl Dear colleague, Sincerely yours, Accompanying wiki page or email Abstract, Introduction Preface, Introduction Greeting IM Email Slide / Page Article Book
    • Entrepreneurship Some Frameworks for Setting Innovation Strategy Geoffrey Moore Managing Director 2004 [email_address]
    • Agenda
      • Some thoughts about Entrepreneurship
      • Overarching Model
        • Innovation Types and the Market Maturity Life Cycle
      • Examples of Innovation Types for
        • Growth Markets
        • Mature Markets
        • Declining Markets
      • Discussion
    • Thoughts about Entrepreneurship
      • Key Attributes of Entrepreneurs
        • Drive to accumulate personal capital
        • Desire for accountability and P&L responsibility
        • Sees innovation in terms of competitive advantage
        • Invests in self and career for long term
      • Entrepreneurship and Other Institutions
        • Non-profits: social entrepreneurship, spiritual capital
        • Corporations: entrepreneurs vs. line executives, staff analysts
        • Incubators: disconnect with survival-of-the-fittest ethic
        • Academic disciplines: no correlation, but not a fit for MBA
        • Engineering: source of innovation and competitive advantage
    • Overarching Model Market Maturity Life Cycle Time Revenue Growth Technology Adoption Life Cycle Early Main Street Mature Main Street Declining Main Street End of Life A D C B Indefinitely elastic middle period Fault Line! E
    • Broad Universe of Innovation Types Disruptive Innovation Application Innovation Product Innovation Platform Innovation Process Innovation Line Extension Innovation Business Model Innovation Marketing Innovation Integration Innovation Structural Innovation Value Chain Innovation Experiential Innovation Renewal
    • Innovating for Growth Markets Disruptive Innovation Application Innovation Product Innovation Platform Innovation
    • Governing Model Technology Adoption Life Cycle Pragmatists create the dynamics of high-tech market development Innovators Early Adopters Early Majority Late Majority Laggards Techies: Try it! Pragmatists: Stick with the herd! Conservatives: Hold on! Skeptics: No way! Visionaries: Get ahead of the herd!
    • Market Development Model Chasm Innovation strategy changes at each stage Early Market Bowling Alley Tornado Main Street
    • Innovating for Growth Markets Disruptive Innovation Application Innovation Product Innovation Platform Innovation
      • Complex Systems: Oracle relational database (vs. hierarchical)‏
      • Volume Operations: eBay auctions ( de novo – no precedent)‏
      • Complex Systems: Agile PLM (distributed ECO management)‏
      • Volume Operations: Nokia SMS (text messaging on cell phones)‏
      • Complex Systems: EMC SANs (Storage Area Networks)‏
      • Volume Operations: Palm Pilot and Treo (PDAs done right)‏
      • Complex Systems: Salesforce.com (Internet as a computing platform)‏
      • Volume Operations: Sony Playstation (entertainment computing)‏
    • Innovating for Mature Markets Process Innovation Line Extension Innovation Business Model Innovation Marketing Innovation Integration Innovation Experiential Innovation
    • Governing Model The Fractal Structure of Maturing Markets
      • Tornado Phase
        • Roll out new infrastructure
        • Focus on standards
      • Mature Main Street - 1
        • Differentiate experiences
        • Focus on narrow segments
      • Early Main Street
        • Expand functionality
        • Focus on broad segments
      Total Available Market PC Cost Reduction
      • Mature Main Street - 2
        • Reduce cost & complexity
        • Focus on lower base price
      Mobile Laptop Server PDAs Task-specific Devices Smart Phones
    • Fractal Marketing: The Nth Device The Example of Telephones Security System PDA Kitchen Phone Office Phone Bedroom Phone Car Phone Cordless Phone Broadband Line Cell Phone Intercom Baby cam Email Device Game Phone Speaker Phone Fax Emergency Phone WiFi Phone VOIP Phone Video Phone The “Aneurism” Effect Ring Tones
    • Innovating for Mature Markets Add value at the surface Reduce costs at the core PC Process Innovation Integration Innovation Business Model Innovation Marketing Innovation Experiential Innovation Line Extension Innovation
    • Innovating for Mature Markets
      • Complex Systems: Cognos Scorecards & Planning (added to BI base)‏
      • Volume Operations: HP inkjet printers (home, photo, portable, commercial)‏
      • Complex Systems: Cambridge Technology Partners RAD methodology
      • Volume Operations: Amazon’s one-click sales process
      • Complex Systems: Cisco IBSG (free Internet strategy use consulting)‏
      • Volume Operations: Apple retail stores (“better together” value proposition)‏
      • Complex Systems: McKinsey Quarterly (thought leadership)‏
      • Volume Operations: AOL’s email (“You’ve got mail!”)‏
      • Complex Systems: Synopsys pricing (from license to lease)‏
      • Volume Operations: Netscape browser (the power of free)‏
      • Complex Systems: SAP R3 (ERP)‏
      • Volume Operations: Microsoft Office (productivity & collaboration suite)‏
      Marketing Innovation Experiential Innovation Business Model Innovation Line Extension Innovation Integration Innovation Process Innovation
    • Broad Universe of Innovation Types Structural Innovation Value Chain Innovation Renewal
    • Innovating for Declining Markets Renewal Innovation Value Chain Innovation Structural Innovation
      • Complex Systems: IBM IGS (from product-led to services-led)‏
      • Volume Operations: Adobe Acrobat (from PC franchise to Internet)‏
      • Complex Systems: Solectron outsourcing (contract manufacturing)‏
      • Volume Operations: Dell Direct (disintermediating retail)‏
      • Complex Systems: BEA acquiring WebLogic (beyond Tuxedo legacy)‏
      • Volume Operations: Visio getting acquired by MSFT (out of market runway)‏
    • Role as Founder-Entrepreneur
      • What will the venture need objectively by way of management from here on out?
        • Management, legal, tech, marketing, print, community management
      • What am I good at?
        • Generalist in all areas, usability, technology evangelist, strategy
      • What, of all these needs of the venture, could I supply, and supply with distinction?
        • Lead user, product evangelist, community manager, board member
      • What do I really want to do, and believe in doing?
        • Teaching, coaching
      • What am I willing to spend years on, if not the rest of my life?
        • Teaching, coaching, research
      • Is this something the venture really needs?
        • Lead user and evangelist, community manager, then board member
      • Is it a major, essential, indispensable contribution?
        • In different phases the needs will be present
      Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.
    • Donna Novitsky Stanford Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders 2007-10-02
      • Go big or don’t go, otherwise not worth all the passion and energy, need opportunity to change things
      • Align company’s goals with funding requirments
        • Seed = Prove can build, it works
        • Series A = Prove there is a market, customers want it
        • Series B = Prove we can scale and grow
        • What are the sub-goals under these? Align goals to funding
      • Nobody can do it alone
        • Success is dependent upon ability to motivate others
        • If cannot trust the team, will cause an entrepreneur to fail
        • Need to find extraordinary people and turn them loose
      • VC pick Markets, People, Technology
        • Pick deals, sit on boards, advise companies
        • Strategy (VC) vs. Execution (Entrepreneur + Team)‏
        • Technology (VC) vs. Team building (Entrepreneur)‏
        • Diversity (VC) vs. Singular Focus (Entrepreneur)‏
      • Develop market while developing the product
        • Need to develop customer and reference base while developing product
        • Make sure first customers are going to be referencable, credible, create profile
        • Look for opportunities that give you free marketing, e.g., SEO on the website
        • Are there partners to work with for mutual benefit to go to market together?
      Copyright © Jeff McNeill, 2007. This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.
      • Global Innovation
      • Clean Technology
      • Biotechnology
      • Communication
        • Forums
        • Email lists
        • Blogs
          • Comments
        • Wikis
        • IRC
      • Syllabus, content, students, schemas
      • API
      • Security
      • Namespace
      • Bugzilla
      • Subversion
      • Forums
    • Slogans for Garden9
      • Seeds for Learning
      • Textbook 2.0
      • Organizational Development
      • Instructional Design for Organizational Development
      • IDOD
    • Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) Making Meaning (Diagrams)‏ Diller, S., Shedroff, N. & Rhea, D. (2006). Making Meaning: How Successful Businesses Deliver Meaningful Customer Experiences. New Riders: Berkeley, CA. McNeill (2007)‏
    • Overview of “Making Meaning”
      • Brand  meaning as focus of value
      • Brand identity  experience design
      • Features/benefits  holistic marketing
      • Experience = “sensation of change”
        • “ Engagement delivered to the customer through an integrated system of ‘touch points’ that conveys or evokes a consistent sense of its essence.” (p.19)‏
      • Meaning = “connotation, worth, or import” (but in positive aspects)‏
        • Cultural (shared)‏
        • Personal (chosen)‏
        • Corporate = “When a company can evoke meaning through its products or services, it is tapping in to what people value most in life. We bond with products, services, and brands based on our ‘experience’ of them and how they evoke meaning to us…. This type of bond between a company and a consumer goes beyond customer satisfaction and brand building. Rather than being a component of marketing or design, designing experiences that evoke meaning is the heart and soul of innovation. As companies look to please customers … as the basis for growth itself, innovation is fueled and directed in a way that creates competitive advantage and lasting competitive advantage for the corporation.” (p.29)‏
    • Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p. 7
      • Meaning benefits
      • Emotional benefits
      • Identity & status benefits
      Evolution of innovation and consumer demand
      • Functional benefits
      • Economic benefits
      2000’s Experience focus 1950’s Brand focus 1900’s Product focus
    • Meanings
      • Accomplishment
      • Beauty
      • Creation
      • Community
      • Enlightenment
      • Freedom
      • Harmony
      • Justice
      • Oneness
      • Redemption
      • Security
      • Truth
      • Validation
      • Wonder
    • Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p. 44 Innovation Cultures Risks Analysis vs. Creativity Execution Leadership Guidance Risk taking is accepted Risk taking is accepted Most innovations are iterative and risk is minimized Creative environment important, but innovation does not rely on “big ideas” Curiosity and creativity are more important than analytics Analytic evalutions are usually more important than creativity Cross-functional collaboration important Execution is often ad hoc and doesn’t follow a set process Cross-functional collaboration not emphasized Senior management with cross-functional teams Senior management Middle mgmt, R&D, and tech depts Strategic thinking guides overall process “ Big Ideas” inspire most innovation initiatives Innovation is the outcome of a formal process Dynamic (39%)‏ Creative (26%)‏ Structured (18%)‏
    • Structuring Change
      • Various teams and functions
        • Brand management
        • Sales management
        • Marketing management & research
        • Design
        • Development
        • Information technology
        • Human resources
        • CEOs
        • Decision makers (may be one or more of above)‏
    • Design Intent
      • Creates corporate value
      • Pervasive
      • Collaborative
      • Includes execution
      • Transparent knowable process
      • Iterative
      • Includes short-term and long-term goals
    • The Innovation Process
      • Find opportunities for meaning
        • Define market
        • Understand customers
      • Choose the experience
        • Define scope
        • Define framework
      • Shape a concept
        • Product concepts
        • Brand concepts
      • Refine a concept
        • Prototype
        • Position
      • Deliver meaning
        • Make the offering
      market customers scope framework product brand prototype offer position Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p.63
    • Market assessment Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) pp.70-71 Industry channels & purchase process? Others Qs? Core customer needs that are addressed? Profiles of customer segments? Technologies or capabilities adopted? Major trends shaping future market? Current & future key players & strategies? Categories in industry, size & growth? Current market size and in 3-5 years?
    • Customer assessment Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) pp.72ff. Others Qs? How do the customers segment based on meaning? How can a desired meaning be delivered? What experiences are currently offered in the marketplace? What type of meaningful experiences do customers want?
    • Incomplete, stopped here
    • Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p. 85 Functional Benefits Economic Benefits Emotional Benefits Identity Benefits Experience Statement Experience Framework
    • Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p. 85 Note: this is an example statement and set of benefits Combine high-performance features with fashionable style elements including shape, texture, and color Functional Benefits Mid to high price range Economic Benefits Convey a sense of serenity and power Emotional Benefits Identify with nature’s athletes who seem to value beautiful products Identity Benefits Create an experience for our customers that evokes accomplishment and appreciation of beauty Experience Statement Experience Framework
    • 5 main components of breadth Promotion Channel Brand Customer Experience Service Product Communications Media Customer Support Alliances Retail Presence Additional components depend on a company’s category and capacity Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p. 92 Shaping the breadth of an integrated experience
    • Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p. 99 Continuation Conclusion Immersion Initiation Promotion Channel Brand Service Product Experience Matrix
    • Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p. 99 Note: this is an example matrix Beginning of Series 2, involving more participations with brand Store and site evolve as customer perceptions of beauty and accomplish-ment evolve A broader range of products branded with this symbol of accomplishment and beauty Personalized relationship all about the beauty of shoes Customer buys more Continuation End of Series 1 New visits Brand now associated with meaning Consultant checks in periodically Deep satisfaction meaning evoked Conclusion Continuation of above. Perhaps an ongoing series of events Additional exposure to store and website Combination of logo on shoes, additional exposure to signage Consultant shops with customer in Footwork store Shoes word first week Immersion Television celebrity endorsement, limited-time special consulting available. Ads spread word about brand Walk by new store designed to express meaning Store signage expressing meaning Consultant “dressing beautifully for activities” available Visuals in window communicate meanings of beauty and accomplish-ment Initiation Promotion Channel Brand Service Product Experience Matrix
    • Additional Readings
      • Experiential Marketing, Schmitt
      • The Entertainment Economy, Wolf
      • The Experience Economy, Pine & Gilmore
      • The Interpretation of Culture, Geertz
    •  
    • Market assessment Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) pp.70-71 Industry channels & purchase process? Others Qs? Core customer needs that are addressed? Profiles of customer segments? Technologies or capabilities adopted? Major trends shaping future market? Current & future key players & strategies? Categories in industry, size & growth? Current market size and in 3-5 years?
    • Customer assessment Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) pp.72ff. Others Qs? How do the customers segment based on meaning? How can a desired meaning be delivered? What experiences are currently offered in the marketplace? What type of meaningful experiences do customers want?
    • Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p. 85 Saves time and effort and allows for sharing and learning from other educators. Also, students spend less time knowing what things are due when, etc. Functional Benefits Faster to prepare for classes, savings for parents. Economic Benefits Convey as sense of collegiality and professional harmony. Emotional Benefits Identify with ones’ profession and up-to-date, professional development Identity Benefits Create an experience which evokes community, creation, and accomplishment, as well as discovery. Experience Statement Experience Framework
      • education
      • communication
      • innovation
      • technology
      • Instructional design
      • Organizational development
      • Organizational learning
      • Learning Organization
      • Organizational Development
      • What type of experience?
      • accomplishment --> achieving
      • wonder --> engaging
      • enlightenment --> developing
      • education
      • innovation
      • innovation education
      • education innovation
      • evolved learning
      • educate
      • innovate
      • cultivate
      • develop
      • garden9
      • professional development and cultivation
      • Organize the gardening tools
      • Keep track of the seeds
      • Seed swapping
      • What works with what seeds or what flower beds?
      • Seeds
      • Purveyor of gardening methods and tools, and the best selection of seeds to plant for learning and professional development.
      • Organic Innovation and Development
      • Grow Smarter
      Metaphors
      • Fractal perspective of seeds and seedbeds
        • Materials are seeds and courses are seedbeds, students are novice gardeners bringing them to love
        • Students are seedbeds and the materials are seeds
        • Students are seeds and they are being watered and tended, growing into their own
        • Organizations are seedbeds and members are seeds, goal is a healthy garden, cross-pollination/fertilization; ideas can be the seeds
        • Organizations are plants within a dangerous garden, needed protection, with a global garden
      kukakuka talking teaching
    • Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p. 99 Continuation Conclusion Immersion Initiation Promotion Channel Brand Service Product Experience Matrix
    • Derrived from Diller, Shedroff & Rhea (2006) p. 99 Note: this is an example matrix Beginning of Series 2, involving more participations with brand Store and site evolve as customer perceptions of beauty and accomplish-ment evolve A broader range of products branded with this symbol of accomplishment and beauty Personalized relationship all about the beauty of shoes Customer buys more Continuation End of Series 1 New visits Brand now associated with meaning Consultant checks in periodically Deep satisfaction meaning evoked Conclusion Continuation of above. Perhaps an ongoing series of events Additional exposure to store and website Combination of logo on shoes, additional exposure to signage Consultant shops with customer in Footwork store Shoes word first week Immersion Television celebrity endorsement, limited-time special consulting available. Ads spread word about brand Walk by new store designed to express meaning Store signage expressing meaning Consultant “dressing beautifully for activities” available Visuals in window communicate meanings of beauty and accomplish-ment Initiation Promotion Channel Brand Service Product Experience Matrix
    • None Little / implement Some / implement High level design / implement / high Train / partner / technical design Service Only choice Leader / Easy / High Return / Safe Leader / Easy / High Return / Safe Innovative New Message None Competitor Pragmatists Pragmatists Enthusiasts None Reference Not Not To pragmatists To public/press To Visionaries Visibility Lower costs; compete on price; Provide whole solution appliance; increase service and ease of use; Vertical orientation; attend industry events; mature management team; maybe Var alliance Create project to productize their interests; manage expectations; small direct sales force Seed this group with early copies; get feedback; implement; keep info flow What to do Market/Low Market/Low Market/Medium High Low Price-point To say no Measured on yearly expenditures Measured on yearly expenditures High budgets for business value Gatekeepers of new technology Org role None Little Hard to win / loyal Hard to please Forgiving of bugs Patience Only viable option Compete with pragmatists Stay with herd 10x potential Tech for own sake Motivation Laggards Conservatives Pragmatists Visionaries Enthusiasts
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