The Great Gatsby Chapter 5
Why is Gatsby nervous when he meets Nick outside his house? <ul><li>He is eager for Nick to arrange a meeting with Daisy <...
What happens before Gatsby meets Daisy that makes him so anxious? <ul><li>His mother arrives in town </li></ul><ul><li>Dai...
How does Nick feel about Gatsby’s offer to compensate him for his help by hiring him? <ul><li>Nick is concerned that the w...
What does Gatsby show Daisy that makes her cry? <ul><li>His unsent letters to her from the war </li></ul><ul><li>A picture...
Why does Nick decide to leave Gatsby’s mansion? <ul><li>He has a date with Jordan </li></ul><ul><li>He feels Gatsby and Da...
Form and structure <ul><li>Chapter 5 is the pivotal chapter of  The Great Gatsby,  as Gatsby’s reunion with Daisy is the h...
Scenes and places <ul><li>p.81 – “The day agreed upon was pouring rain.” </li></ul><ul><li>What is significant about the w...
Characterisation <ul><li>p.83 – “Gatsby, pale as death, with his hands plunged like weights in his coat pockets, was stand...
Setting <ul><li>Look at the description of Gatsby’s mansion on p.85-86. </li></ul><ul><li>What might the use of feudal ima...
The American Dream <ul><li>In this chapter, Gatsby’s house is compared several times to that of a feudal lord, and his imp...
Setting <ul><li>P.88-89 </li></ul>
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Chapter 5

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Chapter 5

  1. 1. The Great Gatsby Chapter 5
  2. 2. Why is Gatsby nervous when he meets Nick outside his house? <ul><li>He is eager for Nick to arrange a meeting with Daisy </li></ul><ul><li>He is waiting for a “shipment” </li></ul><ul><li>He is worried that he has offended Nick </li></ul><ul><li>He has just killed someone </li></ul>
  3. 3. What happens before Gatsby meets Daisy that makes him so anxious? <ul><li>His mother arrives in town </li></ul><ul><li>Daisy cancels their meeting </li></ul><ul><li>It rains </li></ul><ul><li>Nick catches the flu </li></ul>
  4. 4. How does Nick feel about Gatsby’s offer to compensate him for his help by hiring him? <ul><li>Nick is concerned that the work will be illegal </li></ul><ul><li>Nick is offended that Gatsby is offering to pay him for his help </li></ul><ul><li>Nick appreciates the offer, but regretfully declines </li></ul><ul><li>Nick is overjoyed because he hates his current job </li></ul>
  5. 5. What does Gatsby show Daisy that makes her cry? <ul><li>His unsent letters to her from the war </li></ul><ul><li>A picture of his mother </li></ul><ul><li>His collection of nice shirts </li></ul><ul><li>A picture of him aged 18 with a pompadour hairstyle and a yacht </li></ul>
  6. 6. Why does Nick decide to leave Gatsby’s mansion? <ul><li>He has a date with Jordan </li></ul><ul><li>He feels Gatsby and Daisy have forgotten him anyway </li></ul><ul><li>He doesn’t like the songs that Klipspringer is playing </li></ul><ul><li>Gatsby makes a derogatory joke about Nick’s parents </li></ul>
  7. 7. Form and structure <ul><li>Chapter 5 is the pivotal chapter of The Great Gatsby, as Gatsby’s reunion with Daisy is the hinge on which the novel swings. </li></ul><ul><li>Before this event, the story of their relationship exists only in prospect, as Gatsby moves toward a dream that no one else can discern. Afterwards, the plot shifts its focus to the romance between Gatsby and Daisy, and the tensions in their relationship actualize themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>After Gatsby’s history with Daisy is revealed, a meeting between the two becomes inevitable, and it is highly appropriate that the theme of the past’s significance to the future is evoked in this chapter. </li></ul><ul><li>As the novel explores ideas of love, excess, and the American dream, it becomes clearer and clearer to the reader that Gatsby’s emotional frame is out of sync with the passage of time. His nervousness about the present and about how Daisy’s attitude toward him may have changed causes him to knock over Nick’s clock, symbolizing the clumsiness of his attempt to stop time and retrieve the past. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Scenes and places <ul><li>p.81 – “The day agreed upon was pouring rain.” </li></ul><ul><li>What is significant about the weather on the day? </li></ul><ul><li>What technique does Fitzgerald use throughout the chapter? </li></ul>
  9. 9. Characterisation <ul><li>p.83 – “Gatsby, pale as death, with his hands plunged like weights in his coat pockets, was standing in a puddle of water glaring tragically into my eyes.” </li></ul><ul><li>p.85 – “he followed me wildly into the kitchen, closed the door, and whispered: ‘Oh, God!’ in a miserable way. </li></ul><ul><li>[...] ‘You’re acting like a little boy,’ I broke out impatiently. </li></ul><ul><li>How do these extracts contrast the image of Gatsby we have been shown so far in the novel? </li></ul><ul><li>What might be significant about this? </li></ul>
  10. 10. Setting <ul><li>Look at the description of Gatsby’s mansion on p.85-86. </li></ul><ul><li>What might the use of feudal imagery and descriptions of peasants and serfs suggest about The American Dream? </li></ul>
  11. 11. The American Dream <ul><li>In this chapter, Gatsby’s house is compared several times to that of a feudal lord, and his imported clothes, antiques, and luxuries all display a nostalgia for the lifestyle of a British aristocrat. </li></ul><ul><li>Though Nick and Daisy are amazed and dazzled by Gatsby’s splendid possessions, a number of things in Nick’s narrative suggest that something is not right about this transplantation of an aristocrat’s lifestyle into democratic America. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, Nick notes that the brewer who built the house in which Gatsby now lives tried to pay the neighbouring villagers to have their roofs thatched, to complement the style of the mansion. They refused, Nick says, because Americans are obstinately unwilling to play the role of peasants. </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas Jefferson and the other founding fathers envisioned America as a place that would be free of the injustices of class and caste, a place where people from humble backgrounds would be free to try to improve themselves economically and socially. Chapter 5 suggests that this dream of improvement, carried to its logical conclusion, results in a superficial imitation of the old European social system that America supposedly left behind. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Setting <ul><li>P.88-89 </li></ul>

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