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Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
Gamification at work
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Gamification at work

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Gamification is a buzzword in business these days. Both Fortune Magazine and Wall Street Journal have noted this trend in late 2011. M2 Research predicts that the Gamification market will reach 2.6 …

Gamification is a buzzword in business these days. Both Fortune Magazine and Wall Street Journal have noted this trend in late 2011. M2 Research predicts that the Gamification market will reach 2.6 billion by 2016. Gartner predicts that by 2015, 40% of Global 1000 organizations will use gamification as the primary mechanism to transform business operations

As with any innovative trend, best practices are still emerging. Some businesses are taking a “chocolate covered broccoli” approach, simply adding game mechanics such as points, badges and leaderboards to their applications and calling them “gamified.”

This presentation suggests another approach. It outlines a process called Player Centered Design, which is a practical guide for UX designers, Product Managers and Developers to incorporate the principles of Gamification into their software. Player Centered Design involves the following steps:
• Know your Player
• Identify the Mission
• Understand human Motivation
• Apply Mechanics
• Manage, Monitor and Measure

To learn more , please check out the author's book Gamification at Work - Designing Engaging Business Software <http: />.
Thank you for your interest!

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  • If you type in Gamification in Google Trends this is the graph you will see. The term did not exist in our collective consciousness until late 2011.At this point there was a uptick in the interest in the term Gamification. There was a steady increase in 2012, and here we are in 2013.Gamification has been in the news during this time. Forbes and WSJ noted this trend in their Sept and Oct 2011 issues respectively. And there have several articles in various publications ever since.
  • In November last year, Garner published a report on Gamification. In it they made both a positive and negative prediction with regard to gamification. The positive prediction was that 40% of Global 1000 organizations will use gamification as the primary mechanism to transform business operations. The negative prediction was that by 2014, 80% of current gamified applications will fail to meet business objectives, primarily due to poor design. How we avoid being part of the 80%? This is the object of this panel. How can we ensure the success of our future gamification endeavors by learning from the successes and failures of the past. Since Gamification is an emerging topic, the best practices are still emerging. In this panel we will share with you our experience, to guide you towards mastery of enterprise gamification.
  • esthetics
  • esthetics
  • VW kicked off this project in 2009, and my team and I had been working on Sustainability initiatives at SAP for about a year then. We came to the conclusion that for initiatives that require behavior modification, as is the case with sustainability initiatives, the traditional approach of setting a high level goal such as “reduce electricity consumption by 30%”, and checking the results at the end of the year, does not work. People are busy with competing priorities and changing their ways is hard. We need to get their attention if we want them to do business differently. It is in the spirit of that thought process, we created this game that we called Vampire Hunters. Vampires are energy suckers that use energy even when they are not in use – monitors, copiers, etc. Vampires waste $3 B of energy every year in the US alone. Employees can help facilities spot these vampires, and enjoy a little competition between buildings and departments. I can show you the full story board of Vampire hunters after this lecture if you are interested.I was drawn to gamification primarily for behavior modification in the workplace. It is at the intersection of Games for change and Serious games.
  • http://www.interaction-design.org/books/gamification_at_work.htmlhttp://www.amazon.com/Gamification-Work-Designing-Engaging-Business/dp/8792964079/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1371751645&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=gamification+at+work
  • Transcript

    • 1. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 1 Gamification @ Work Janaki Kumar | Design and Co-Innovation Center
    • 2. 2 © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Gamification is the application of game design principles and mechanics to non-game environments.
    • 3. 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 3 Speed Camera Lottery Average speed reduced from 35 to 25 km/hr
    • 4. 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 4 Electric Vehicles
    • 5. 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 5 Nike +
    • 6. 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 6 foursquare
    • 7. 7 Enterprise software runs business 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Shop floor to the top floor Enterprise to Individual 7
    • 8. 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 8 Can we mix the two?
    • 9. 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 9 “The opposite of play is not work, it is depression” – Brian Sutton-Smith
    • 10. 10 Gamification Trends 2011 2013 © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Sept 2011 Gamification Gets Down to Business Oct 2011 Latest Game Theory: Mixing Work and Play 10
    • 11. Reason 1 for growth of gamification Changing nature of work. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved
    • 12. Reason 2 for growth of gamification Entry of digital natives. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved
    • 13. Reason 3 for growth of Gamification Technology – big data, social media and mobile technology. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved
    • 14. 14 Gamification Trends 2011 2013 © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Nov 2012 by 2015, 40% of Global 1000 organizations will use gamification as the primary mechanism to transform business operations. by 2014, 80% of current gamified applications will fail to meet business objectives, primarily due to poor design
    • 15. 15 Would you want to play this game? Score 100,000,000,000 You are #1 ! 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Each click earns 100,000 points “Games give us unnecessary obstacles that we volunteer to tackle” – Jane McGonigal
    • 16. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 16
    • 17. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 17 know your player
    • 18. 18 Multi-dimensional Player © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved  Professional goals  Gender  Generation  Culture  Player type
    • 19. 19 © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Professional Goals      Job title & role Job description Career goals Pain-points Aspirations
    • 20. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 20 Gender
    • 21. 21 Generation © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Generation X  Hierarchy oriented  Failure not allowed Generation Y  Grew up with videogames  Expect immediate feedback  Take risks and expect “epic fail”  10,000+ hours of experience The average gamer is 30 years of age and has been playing for 12 years. 68% of gamers are 18 years of age. Entertainment Software Association 2013 data
    • 22. 22 Culture Individual vs. Group © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Harmony vs. Competition
    • 23. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 23
    • 24. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 24
    • 25. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 25 Identify the mission
    • 26. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 26
    • 27. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 27 Understand Motivation
    • 28. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 28
    • 29. 29 © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Collecting Motivational Drivers A curated list
    • 30. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 30 Connecting Motivational Drivers A curated list
    • 31. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 31 Achievement Motivational Drivers A curated list
    • 32. 32 © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Feedback Motivational Drivers A curated list
    • 33. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 33 Self Expression Motivational Drivers A curated list
    • 34. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 34 Reciprocity Motivational Drivers A curated list
    • 35. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 35 Source: Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, 1991 Beyond Boredom and Anxiety: Experiencing Flow in Work and Play, 1975
    • 36. 36 Motivational Drivers © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved A curated list  Collecting  Connecting  Achievement  Feedback  Self expression  Reciprocity  Blissful Productivity
    • 37. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 37 Apply Mechanics
    • 38. 38 Game Mechanics Full list Achievement 17. Epic Meaning 33. Progression Dynamic 2. Appointment Dynamic 18. Extinction 34. Ratio Reward Schedules 3. Avoidance 19. Fixed Interval Rewards Schedules 35. Real-time v. Delayed Mechanics 4. Behavioral Contrast 20. Fixed Ratio Rewards Schedule 36. Reinforcer 5. Behavioral Momentum 21. Free Lunch 37. Response 6. Blissful Productivity 22. Fun Once, Fun Always 38. Reward Schedules 7. Cascading Information Theory 23. Interval Reward Schedules 39. Rolling Physical Goods 8. Chain Schedules 24. Lottery 40. Shell Game 9. Communal Discovery 25. Loyalty 41. Social Fabric of Games 10. Companion Gaming 26. Meta Game 42. Status 11. Contingency 27. Micro Leader-board 43. Urgent Optimism 12. Countdown 28. Modifiers 44. Variable Interval Reward Sched. 13. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 1. 29. Moral Hazard of Game Play Cross Situational Leaderboards 45. Variable Ratio Reward Schedule 14. Disincentives 30. Ownership 46. Viral Game Mechanics 15. Endless Games 31. Pride 47. Virtual Items 16. Envy 32. Privacy Source: http://techcrunch.com/2010/08/25/scvngr-game-mechanics/
    • 39. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 39 Points Game mechanics A curated list
    • 40. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 40 Badges Game mechanics A curated list
    • 41. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 41 Leaderboard Game mechanics A curated list
    • 42. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 42 Rewards Game mechanics A curated list
    • 43. 43 © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Relationship Game mechanics A curated list
    • 44. 44 © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Challenge Game mechanics A curated list
    • 45. 45 Constraints with Urgent Optimism © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Ends Wed 03/24 Midnight EST Game mechanics A curated list
    • 46. 46 Journey © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Progress bar Onboarding / scaffolding Game mechanics A curated list
    • 47. 47 © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Narrative Game mechanics A curated list
    • 48. 48 Emotion esthetics Humor © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Humor Game mechanics A curated list
    • 49. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 49
    • 50. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 50
    • 51. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 51
    • 52. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 52
    • 53. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 53 Gamification Examples
    • 54. 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 54 Gamification to change behavior
    • 55. Gamification – Slalom One
    • 56. Gamification – TrueOffice
    • 57. Community – SAP SCN © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved
    • 58. 59 Leveling up – Gamification Gurus Gabe Zichermann Amy Jo Kim Byron Reeves Sebastian Deterding © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Jane McGonigal Jesse Schell
    • 59. © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved 60 Leveling up – Books
    • 60. 61 Leveling up – Book Gamification at Work Designing Engaging Business © 2013 Janaki Kumar All rights reserved Janaki Kumar Mario Herger Preview on InteractionDesign.org Buy on Amazon
    • 61. Summary Gamification is now business relevant It is not easy to do gamification right Introducing Player Centered Design: ... Know your player ... Identify your mission ... Understand motivation …Apply Mechanics …Manage, Monitor and Measure Thank you! Janaki Kumar | @janakikumar | http://gamificationatwork.org/

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