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Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
Lesson planning   spain
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Lesson planning spain

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  • 1. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama Glottodrama Introduction: What is Glottodrama? (adapted from Guide to Glottodrama Method, by Carlo Nofri) The Glottodrama project aims to create an innovative methodology to teach foreign languages through Drama and Theatre. It focuses the attention on the “oral language” since the achievement of a satisfactory standard in oral skills often represents a weak point in many school and academic programmes. Moreover, it shares a broader concept of “language competence” to encompass both verbal and no-verbal aspects of communication. This general idea has been translated in pedagogical terms and summarized with the formula of “a communicative approach with a humanistic-affective orientation”. To turn into a practical methodology these theoretical assumptions, Glottodrama developers have chosen to develop a research work aimed to integrate the communicative approach with the actors’ training. The teaching is based on the work-project pedagogical idea and classes are intended as workshops of actors’ training with the employment of a foreign language. The syllabus is semi-procedural and according to the programme the first step is working on micro-texts, involving the students in some basic activities: dramatising a text, role-taking, role-play, story- telling, monologues and improvisation. In the second step the course concentrates on preparing a complete play to perform (either a theatre play or a movie script or a self-produced play). The text is explored by the student-actors in all its dimensions (linguistic, cultural and dramaturgic) under the guide of 2 teachers (1 language teacher and 1 drama teacher) who take the roles of language counsellor and actors’ coach. The Glottodrama Method moves from a communicative and humanistic approach to language teaching. It is based on a holistic perspective of the language acquisition process in which both cognitive and behavioural aspects are relevant, that is to say feelings, emotions and attitudes. The pedagogical challenge of this interdisciplinary approach to language learning is to stimulate student’s motivation by a strong and personal psychological involvement. In fact it refers basically to the best known emotional theories of acting (Stanislavskij System and Strasberg Method of the Actors Studio). The final scope of the project has been to demonstrate on scientific basis that this methodology - far from being just a mere technique or a playful side activity to enrich ordinary
  • 2. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama courses - is a complete approach to language teaching. It can be combined with other programmes or stand alone as an autonomous, effective and alternative language course. A method able to target the usual school and academic objectives in terms of language and communicative competence and able to reach them in a faster and more pleasant way. The final results of teaching experiments have shown to be consistent with the Glottodrama project hypotheses and predictions. Quantitative evaluation: Glottodrama students who sat for language examinations have scored remarkably better in oral papers than control class students, that is to say Glottodrama students learn better and faster the oral language. In addition they have shown results in written skills equivalent to students of control classes where other methodologies - more grammar and written skills based - have been employed. Also a qualitative evaluation has shown the positive psychological impact of the methodology on both students and teachers. On one hand it has reinforced students’ motivation involving them more than any previous experience, on the other hand it has offered also to teachers a good chance for professional growth, an opportunity to widen their knowledge of teaching techniques and to enrich their pedagogical experience. To put it in a nutshell: - Test Teach Test based lessons; - a lesson shouldn’t exceed 3 hours; - the whole course is planned for 90 hours; - the class is led by two teachers – a language teacher and a drama teacher; Equipment - A workshop-classroom - A “stage” area - A video-camera - An overhead projector or whiteboard - An equipped grammar corner (with dictionaries, grammar books, computers with Internet access, activity sheets...)
  • 3. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama Structure of teaching units 1. Textual or situational input. At the beginning of a Glottodrama course, we will only work with microtexts).We present the text or video and analyse it. 2. Performance of a short situation (in small heterogenous groups) that is related to the video or text students have just read or watched. We record it and play it for the rest of the class. 3. Linguistic reflection (at the grammar corner). Now we reflect on language: explore more deeply the vocabulary and grammar aspects of the text. A synthesis that formalizes into rules what has been discovered should be provided by the tutors, if asked, only at the end of this work. Grammar is explained in a natural order, that is, whenever we come across a certain grammatical structure, although we have to bear in mind that students need some previous knowledge about grammar. For instance, in this didactic unit students must be familiar with the Past Simple. 4. Actor Studio (rehearsal) 5. Back to the performance
  • 4. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama TABLE TO ANALYSE AND EXPLOIT A TEACHING UNIT Communicative Typology Micro Text Macro Text Textual Input Situational Input Activity Title Source (Authors) CEFR Level (Common European Framework) A1 A2 B1 B2 C1 C2 Target Language Skills OC WC OP WP INT (Oral Comprehension, Written Comprehension, Oral Production, Written Production, Interaction) Activity Description
  • 5. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama Linguistic Functions Main grammar structures Vocabulary and phraseology Cultural and sociolinguistic elements Specific drama activities Specific language activities Teaching notes
  • 6. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama Attached materials Text: SILLY SONG by Federico Garcia Lorca Mama, I wish I were silver. Son, You’d be very cold. Mama, I wish I were water. Son, You’d be very cold. Mama, Embroider me on your pillow. That, yes! Right away!
  • 7. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama TABLE TO ANALYSE AND EXPLOIT A TEACHING UNIT Communicative Typology Micro Text X Macro Text Textual Input Situational Input Activity Title The Silly Song Source (Authors) Cecilia Díaz Marín CEFR Level (Common European Framework) A1 A2 X B1 B2 C1 C2 Target Language Skills OC WC OP WP INT X (Oral Comprehension, Written Comprehension, Oral Production, Written Production, Interaction) Activity Description 1. Input. Start the lesson by briefly explaining who Federico García Lorca was. Make one of your students read the poem aloud and ask them what the poem is about. 2. Performance. In heterogeneous groups of four, students invent a short situation in which people talk about what they would be like to be/to be like/ to do. You can suggest possible situations: group of friends making suggestions for their upcoming trip to Granada; parents and children X X
  • 8. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama discussing career choices at the University of Granada, etc. Make sure it is a real drama situation -with a short plot including a beginning, an action with a climax and a denoument-, but it does not have to be very long. 3. Grammar Corner. We watch the performances, and we focus on the language used by students in their performances. Grammar that is likely to appear: First and second conditional sentences, hypothetical sentences, suggestions... Vocabulary that is likely to appear: materials, professions, places of the city (in Granada)... 4. Actors Studio. Rehearsal of the same situation, but in this case, students correct their mistakes (pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary... but also in terms of drama. Is it a real dramatic situation? Can it be improved?) 5. Back to the performance. Students perform their situations again, and we record and watch it again, and compare it to their first performance. Both can be included in our students' Portfolio. Linguistic Functions - Making suggestions - Making hypothesis Main grammar structures - First and second conditional - Hypothetical sentences Vocabulary and phraseology - Materials - Jobs - Making suggestions Cultural and sociolinguistic elements - A poet from Granada: Federico García Lorca - University of Granada - Places to visit in Granada Specific drama activities - Perfomance of a short situation talking about wishes Specific language activities - Non communicative activities to practice the grammar and vocabulary that we are likely to come across during the
  • 9. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama performances. - Writing a poem using hypothetical sentences (similar to “The Silly Song”) Teaching notes Aims: -to improve oral communicative competence using English. - to appreciate the rhythm and beauty of a poem. - to master the grammatical structures and vocabulary that we will come across during the teaching unit. - to develop creativity in order to write a short poem and a short script for the performance. - to work cooperatively in small groups. - to learn about the city of Granada and its most famous poet, Federico García Lorca. - to overcome shyness and to strenghten self steem and assurance. - to develop a positive attitude towards the work of other groups. Attached materials - Poem. Evaluation - See attached rubric
  • 10. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama Oral Presentation Rubric : The Silly Song Student Name: ________________________________________ CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Pitch Pitch was often used and it conveyed emotions appropriately. Pitch was often used but the emotion it conveyed sometimes did not fit the content. Pitch was rarely used OR the emotion it conveyed often did not fit the content. Pitch was not used to convey emotion. Pauses Pauses were effectively used 2 or more times to improve meaning and/or dramatic impact. Pauses were effectively used once to improve meaning and/or dramatic impact. Pauses were intentionally used but were not effective in improving meaning or dramatic impact. Pauses were not intentionally used. Enthusiasm Facial expressions and body language generate a strong interest and enthusiasm about the topic in others. Facial expressions and body language sometimes generate a strong interest and enthusiasm about the topic in others. Facial expressions and body language are used to try to generate enthusiasm, but seem somewhat faked. Very little use of facial expressions or body language. Did not generate much interest in topic being presented. Speaks Clearly Speaks clearly and distinctly all (100- 95%) the time, and mispronounces no words. Speaks clearly and distinctly all (100- 95%) the time, but mispronounces one word. Speaks clearly and distinctly most ( 94-85%) of the time. Mispronounces no more than one Often mumbles or can not be understood OR mispronounces more than one word.
  • 11. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama word. Props Student uses several props (could include costume) that show considerable work/creativity and which make the presentation better. Student uses 1 prop that shows considerable work/creativity and which make the presentation better. Student uses 1 prop which makes the presentation better. The student uses no props OR the props chosen detract from the presentation. Uses Complete Sentences Always (99-100% of time) speaks in complete sentences. Mostly (80-98%) speaks in complete sentences. Sometimes (70- 80%) speaks in complete sentences. Rarely speaks in complete sentences. Content Shows a full understanding of the topic. Shows a good understanding of the topic. Shows a good understanding of parts of the topic. Does not seem to understand the topic very well. Collaboration with Peers Almost always listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others in the group. Tries to keep people working well together. Usually listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others in the group. Does not cause "waves" in the group. Often listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others in the group but sometimes is not a good team member. Rarely listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others in the group. Often is not a good team member.
  • 12. Lesson Planning – Granada Spain – Drama Volume Volume is loud enough to be heard by all audience members throughout the presentation. Volume is loud enough to be heard by all audience members at least 90% of the time. Volume is loud enough to be heard by all audience members at least 80% of the time. Volume often too soft to be heard by all audience members. Listens to Other Presentations Listens intently. Does not make distracting noises or movements. Listens intently but has one distracting noise or movement. Sometimes does not appear to be listening but is not distracting. Sometimes does not appear to be listening and has distracting noises or movements. Acting Acts naturally. Shows a lot of expression and emotion. Acts with certain naturality. Shows some expression and emotion. Sometimes acts naturally. Shows a little expression and emotion. Acts without any naturality. Monotone and not expressive. Playwriting Play was creative and really held the audience's interest. Play was creative and usually held the audience's interest. Play had several creative elements, but often did not hold the audience's interest. Play needed more creative elements

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