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Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
Teaching Critical World Languages In The US
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Teaching Critical World Languages In The US

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  • These are approximations of US grades. Multiple sources: Pufahl, Ingrid, Rhodes, Nancy C., and Christian, Donna. 2002. Foreign Language Teaching: What the United States Can Learn From Other Countries. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.Li, Minglin. 2007. Foreign Language Education in Primary Schools in the People’s Republic of China. Current Issues in Language Planning, vol.8, no. 2, pp. 148-161.Goto Butler, Yuko. 2007. Foreign Language Education at Elementary Schools in Japan: Searching for Solutions Amidst Growing Diversification. Current Issues in Language Planning, vol.8, no.2, 2007.pp. 129 – 147.Gargesh, Ravinder. 2006. Language Issues in the Context of Higher Education in India. PowerPoint presentation given at the Language Issues in English Medium Universities Across Asia Symposium at University of Hong Kong, June, 2006. Available online, March 10, 2009: www.hku.hk/clear/doc/DAY%201/Ravinder%20Gargesh.PPT.Eurydice. 2005. Key Data on Teaching Languages at School in Europe. Eurydice: Brussels, Belgium. Russia-InfoCenter. 2006. General Education. Available online, March 11, 2009: http://www.russia-ic.com/education_science/education/system/103/Dixon, L. Quentin. 2003. The Bilingual Education Policy in Singapore: Implications for Second Language Acquisition. Paper presented at the Annual International Symposium of Bilingualism, (Tempe Arizona, April 30-May3, 2003). Available online March 11, 2009: http://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/1b/2d/e8.pdf
  • National Center for Education Statistics (2000). Enrollment in foreign language courses compared with enrollment in grades 9 through 12 in public secondary schools, fall 1948 through fall 2000. Digest of Educational Statistics, Table 53.Furman, Nelly, Goldberg, David and Lusin, Natalia (2007). Enrollment in foreign languages other than English in United States Institutions of Higher Education, Fall 2006. Modern Language Association, web publication 12, November 2007.
  • National Center for Education Statistics (2000). Enrollment in foreign language courses compared with enrollment in grades 9 through 12 in public secondary schools, fall 1948 through fall 2000. Digest of Educational Statistics, Table 53.Furman, Nelly, Goldberg, David and Lusin, Natalia (2007). Enrollment in foreign languages other than English in United States Institutions of Higher Education, Fall 2006. Modern Language Association, web publication 12, November 2007.
  • Rhodes & Pufahl (2009). Fingertrip Facts: National K-12 Foreign Language Survey – Trends Over a Decade: 2008 vs 1997. CAL. Unpublished data.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Teaching Critical World Languages in the US <br />Asia Society Global Forum<br />July 10 , 2009<br />1<br />
    • 2. Presenters<br />Shuhan C. Wang, Ph.D.<br /> Deputy Director, National Foreign Language Center, University of Maryland swang@nflc.org<br />Michele Aoki, Ph.D. to be completed<br />Gregg Roberts, to be completed<br />
    • 3. Topics<br />Meet a critical need of the US: world languages education<br />Share Washington and Utah experiences<br />Rethink US world language education: How do we move forward, especially about offering critical languages? <br />3<br />
    • 4. Big Questions for the Audience<br />Why should states and the US offer critical/world languages? <br />What accomplishments have been made and what challenges remain?<br />What strategies can states and the US take to move critical language education forward? <br />
    • 5. A Flat World Requires the Use of<br />2 or More Languages<br />Monolinguals 1/3<br />Bilinguals &amp; Multilinguals 2/3<br />Crystal, 1997<br />
    • 6. 21 of the Top 25 Industrialized Countries Begin the Study of a World Language in Grades K-5<br />* The US<br />Sources:Pufahl, Rhodes, &amp; Christian, 2002; <br />Li, 2007; Goto Butler, 2007; Gargesh, 2006; Eurydice, 2005; Russia-InfoCenter, 2006; <br />Dixon, 2003.<br />
    • 7. World Language Education: <br />EU Countries<br />21 of the 31 EU countries require students to study another language for at least nine years.<br />Source: Eurydice. 2005. Key Data on Teaching Languages at School in Europe. Eurydice: Brussels, Belgium.<br />7<br />
    • 8. Only 12 US States Require the Study of World Languages<br />Source: 2008 National Survey of States for World Teacher Capacity (NFLC, CCSSO, AS, 2009, work in progress)<br />8<br />
    • 9. Percentage ofUS Students Studying World Languages<br /> 43.8%<br />1.6%<br /> 14.7%<br />8.6%<br />Post-Secondary<br />(advanced levels)<br />Post-Secondary (All)<br />Middle School<br />High School<br />9<br />Middle school &amp; high school data: National Center for Educational Statistics (2000); Post-secondary data: Furman, Goldberg, and Lusin (2007)<br />
    • 10. World Languages in US K-12 Schools<br />Elementary and middle school world language programs were negatively affected by NCLB<br />10 Year Comparison<br />Rhodes, N. and Pufhal, I. (CAL, 2009)<br />10<br />
    • 11. 11<br />Languages Taught in Elementary Schools(Center for Applied Linguistics, 1997 &amp; 2008)<br />* SP SP SP: Spanish for Speakers of Spanish<br />** Chinese: + 900% increase<br />(http://cal.org/flsurvey)<br />
    • 12. 12<br />Languages Taught in Secondary Schools (Center for Applied Linguistics, 1997 &amp; 2008)<br />* Chinese: + 300%<br />(http://cal.org/flsurvey)<br />
    • 13. Enrollments in Higher Education Language Courses: Fall 1998, 2002, and 2006<br />Source: Enrollments in Languages Other Than English in United States Institutions of Higher Education, Fall 2006. MLA, accessible at http://www.mla.org/enroll_survey06_fin.<br />13<br />
    • 14. 14<br />Trends for World Language Education in the US<br />Recognition of the need for critical languages in our schools<br />Awareness of the importance of global competence that includes communicative abilities and cultural understanding <br />Immersion and early language learning programs<br />WL as an exit or high school graduation requirement <br />K-16 articulation aligned with Standards and real life use<br />
    • 15. Think Strategically<br />Globalized economy breaks down national boundary and demands workers/professionals with global competence <br />World language study helps students develop linguistic and cultural capital<br />Offer critical languages that reflect 21st century reality and demands<br />Make a long term commitment to world language education that builds high human capital for the community, state, and nation<br />

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