Him

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Him

  1. 1. CELLPHONE VIRUS AND BY SECURITY HIMANSHU KUMAR REG.NO:-U11CS056
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION 2
  3. 3. Smart Phones ‘R Pocket Computers  Most commonly used phones, as defined by operating system (OS) –  Android (Android OS)  BlackBerry (RIM OS)  iPhones / iPod touch (iPhone OS)  PalmPre (WebOS)  Windows Mobile (WinMobile OS) 3
  4. 4. Current threats by mobile malware  For financial gain / loss      Unnecessary calls / SMS / MMS Send and sell private information Cause phones to work slowly or crash Wipe out contact books and other information on the phone Install “false” applications
  5. 5. Internet, Bluetooth, and MMS  In all of these transfer methods, the user has to agree at least once to run the infected file  But smart phone virus writters get you to open and install their product the same way computer virus writers do:  The virus is typically disguised as a game, security patch or other desirable application 5
  6. 6. Viruses and Smart Phones  How smart phone viruses spread –  Internet downloads  Bluetooth  Multimedia Messaging System (MMS)  Only smart phones susceptible to viruses  Phones that can only make and receive calls are not at risk 6
  7. 7. HISTORY iPhone SMS attack first took place in July 2009 We trust smart phones & think they are safe We have the mistaken sense they are immune to security threats Smart phones typically lack security features, like antivirus, found on other computers 7
  8. 8. Classification of Mobile Viruses
  9. 9. Classification Behaviour  Virus  Worm  Trojan  Environment  Operating System  Vulnerable Application 
  10. 10. :secrL yksr eps a K ba uo S Classification (examples) Mobile Worms and Viruses 31st October 2006
  11. 11. Case Studies
  12. 12. Case Study – CABIR First mobile worm  Spread vector – Bluetooth  Infected file – caribe.sis  15 new variants exist 
  13. 13. Case Study - ComWar Second landmark in mobile worms  Spread vector - Bluetooth and MMS  Large spread area due to MMS  Not as proof of concept – Intention to harm by charging the mobile user  Multiple variants detected 
  14. 14. Case Study - CardTrap First cross-over mobile virus found  Can migrate from mobile to PC  Propogates as infected mobile application as well as Windows worm  2 variants found 
  15. 15. Protective Measures
  16. 16. Securing against attacks System level security  MOSES  Network Level Security  Proactive approach 
  17. 17. Lock Down Bluetooth!  Bluetooth is default-on  Wastes your battery  Leaves you open to Bluetooth-based attacks – most common at this time 17
  18. 18. Secure an iPhone  Auto-Lock locks the touch screen for a preset time period after not being used for one, two, three, four or five minutes. Turned on by default but can be disabled altogether  Password-protect the SIM card on a 3G  The Erase Data function lets you completely wipe your iPhone after 10 failed passcode attempts 18
  19. 19. Social Engineering Threats  The best security in the world will not help you if –  You click on an phishing email and give your personal information  You click on a SMS/text message that appears to come from your carrier  You respond to a vishing phone call*  Never give information via email or by phone or on the web, unless you initiate the exchange 19
  20. 20. Threats to Smart Phones  Attackers will exploit our social conditioning entering Personally Identifiable Information (PI/PII), while interacting with phone voice response to commit vishing and identity theft.1  We demand more and better availability from phone service than we would from an ISP, “so the threat of a DoS attack might compel carriers to pay out on a blackmail scam.”1  “At this point, mobile device capability is far ahead of security… We’ll start to see the botnet problem infiltrate the mobile world in 2012.”2 20

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