Jerry Bradshaw
Tarheel Canine Training, Inc.
1:15PM Tuesday July 16
Davidson A Classroom
 Author (Decides the Purpose
of the Scenario - Trainer)
 Beginning (In brief of set up
and information provided)
 Middl...
 Training should exceed
certification requirements.
 Ideally certification
should involve elements
of Scenario training
...
 Trainer writes the scenario
 Trainer Decides the Purpose of
Scenario and how it plays out in
order to clearly convey th...
 Most Important Issue
 Decision making: K9 handler is
faced with a decision or decisions
based on information given in t...
 Purpose: K9 Skills or Tactical Approach
or both?
 Are K9 and handler Ready?
 Beginning: Author decides what
informatio...
 Once the scenario begins, the
trainer must be able to switch
out of a deployment/scenario
mode into support training.
 ...
 Deploy from cover
 Alert to Threat
 Make Apprehension
 Get Compliance
 Handcuffing
 Disengage K9
 Re-deploy K9 (Ca...
 Identifying the passive threat is key element in this
short scenario.
 Deployment of K9 in this case we step out of
tac...
 If your foundation
lacks…
 If your skill training is
incomplete…
 You will have trouble
training scenarios and
deployi...
 I especially like to train
the “Beginning” part of
a scenario
 EX: Acquiring a Threat
for an apprehension
 If the dog ...
 Once the parts are good,
put it together back to
front – This is called
back-chaining
 Don’t complicate things
too fast...
 In bite-work sessions,
start early deploying
from cover positions.
 Train your decoys to
add in ground work
 Add in ba...
 What are the goals of the scenario?
 Are they dog related? K9 Skills
 Are they handler related? Proper Usage, Tactical...
 Identify what elements of scenario will test the
handler’s decision making
 The K9 must be ready in terms of his skills...
 K9 performance
 Handler Performance
 Video the Scenario if possible for
deconstruction
 What deficiencies in training...
 Training that doesn’t look like deployment can still prepare
you for the deployment
 Ex: Sustained Confrontations….driv...

Introduction to scenario based training (short)
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Introduction to scenario based training (short)

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This is a version of the presentation without the video support, the vide file too large to upload to slideshare, so I apologize for that in advance.

This presentation discusses key elements to pay attention to when you are designing scenario based training,

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Introduction to scenario based training (short)

  1. 1. Jerry Bradshaw Tarheel Canine Training, Inc. 1:15PM Tuesday July 16 Davidson A Classroom
  2. 2.  Author (Decides the Purpose of the Scenario - Trainer)  Beginning (In brief of set up and information provided)  Middle (Where the Story Plays Out)  End (How the Story Concludes)  Players (Good Guys and Bad Guys)  Plot (How the story unfolds including any twists)  Costume (Dressing as you would in reality)  Theme (Message The Story is Intended to Convey)
  3. 3.  Training should exceed certification requirements.  Ideally certification should involve elements of Scenario training  This is one of the biggest reasons scenario training isn’t done more widely  Training for the certification rather than for deployment.  Decoys can make or break scenario work – playing the role!
  4. 4.  Trainer writes the scenario  Trainer Decides the Purpose of Scenario and how it plays out in order to clearly convey the theme of the scenario.  Trainer must be a part of the scenario to provide key information and to be able to bail out of the scenario into support training.  Too often “Scenario Training” is just regular training “Dressed up” with gear on, and while this serves a purpose to condition the dog to handler and back up in deployment gear, unless the scenario is constructed to convey some key lessons, the exercise falls short.
  5. 5.  Most Important Issue  Decision making: K9 handler is faced with a decision or decisions based on information given in the in brief. How to approach situations with your dog. Relative Strengths and Weaknesses.  Tactics: Cover, Concealment, Communication (Handler & Back- Up), Officer Safety (Handler & Back- Up), Managing K9 (general control, weapon use, less lethal combinations, gear). These things are often left out of training.  Dog MUST have required foundation work and skills to be able to complete the scenario!  Trainer is either “testing” or “guiding” the decision making process.
  6. 6.  Purpose: K9 Skills or Tactical Approach or both?  Are K9 and handler Ready?  Beginning: Author decides what information to provide and what to leave ambiguous.  Planning the scenario is key…often things to no go the way the tester envisions!  Don’t test too many things at once, as it can lead to breakdown of the scenario.  If you identify a weakness in the dog’s ability, re-set the scenario to address it – don’t let the dog continue and get a bad experience.  Example: Area Search Scenario with 2 Suspects in a car junkyard.  Elements Being Tested:  Where to Start? Into Wind….  Where to place back-up?  Deployment/Tactical concept?….Clear, down and cover? Long Line? Off leash?  Tactics….When dog is on, does handler approach and clear as he goes? Placement of back-up during approach…  Is the dog ready to stay on the grip during a tactical approach?  If dog just alerts on a vehicle, recall to cover, and verbal challenge….once decoy #1 in custody, can the dog continue searching?  In the case it’s a bite, can the dog refocus and continue?  How does the handler deal with the dog if the dog is obsessed with first decoy?  Temporary intervention by the trainer can guide handler here….
  7. 7.  Once the scenario begins, the trainer must be able to switch out of a deployment/scenario mode into support training.  Example: Suppose as part of a tactical building search scenario, the dog is expected to make an apprehension in a tight space under pressure.  Training should have ALREADY addressed these variables before they become part of a realistic scenario. However, if the dog has a problem engaging, the trainer should have discussed a “bail out” strategy to make sure the dog doesn’t have a bad experience, “TRAINING!”
  8. 8.  Deploy from cover  Alert to Threat  Make Apprehension  Get Compliance  Handcuffing  Disengage K9  Re-deploy K9 (Can you? Always think +1)
  9. 9.  Identifying the passive threat is key element in this short scenario.  Deployment of K9 in this case we step out of tactical scenario and train the engagement how we want it to play out. Choice of slick floors and 6 foot leash was deliberate.  This handler needs to communicate better with back-up during the engagement and handcuffing.  This scenario can be made more complex by adding long-line, maintaining cover during deployment and engagement, adding a tactical approach with back up and weapons.
  10. 10.  If your foundation lacks…  If your skill training is incomplete…  You will have trouble training scenarios and deploying in real life  EX: This dog doesn’t understand a passive apprehension on a civil decoy, so preparing an elaborate scenario involving this skill will be a waste of time!
  11. 11.  I especially like to train the “Beginning” part of a scenario  EX: Acquiring a Threat for an apprehension  If the dog can’t acquire the threat the rest of the scenario is meaningless.  In this video handler breaks cover to help “Training”
  12. 12.  Once the parts are good, put it together back to front – This is called back-chaining  Don’t complicate things too fast, remember to add variables slowly as the team progresses  Know your team’s relative strengths and weaknesses.
  13. 13.  In bite-work sessions, start early deploying from cover positions.  Train your decoys to add in ground work  Add in back-up  Decondition the dog to multiple back-up  Back-Up behind Cover  Almost all foundation training can be done in this environment rather than on a sterile field
  14. 14.  What are the goals of the scenario?  Are they dog related? K9 Skills  Are they handler related? Proper Usage, Tactical Decisions, K9 Management.  Is the dog ready for the complexity of the scenario?  Will it require full gear? Does that add something important to the training at hand?  Is the scenario “doomed to fail?” This does not add confidence for the handler or K9.  Train the parts of the scenario, bring it together, then dress it up.  Always maintain Foundation and Skills proficiency during scenario training – never operate without a way to influence the dog’s behavior!  Behavior is reliable if it is conditioned. Make foundation and skills a habit so that when the scenario training takes place you have confidence in your dog!
  15. 15.  Identify what elements of scenario will test the handler’s decision making  The K9 must be ready in terms of his skills to be able to focus on the handler’s behavior  Provide adequate but incomplete information to the handler  Deploy/No Deploy Scenarios can be practiced without a dog (Graham v. Connor)  “Failure to Engage”? Maintain officer safety!
  16. 16.  K9 performance  Handler Performance  Video the Scenario if possible for deconstruction  What deficiencies in training does the scenario bring up? Be honest!  What deficiencies in handler performance, maintaining cover, tactics, deployment choices did the scenario bring up?
  17. 17.  Training that doesn’t look like deployment can still prepare you for the deployment  Ex: Sustained Confrontations….drive channeling work, allowing the dog to stay on the grip for extended periods can physically and mentally condition the dog (Duration)  Ex: Teaching the dog to FIGHT Hard….using defense threshold training and drive channeling can teach the dog to stay in a Fight (Intensity)  These things shouldn’t just be trotted out for a scenario, they should be foundational staples of training.  Training can make the dog dependent on cues not available in a scenario or deployment…..making noise on a building search when the dog fails to engage….remember the passive guy on a bench?
  18. 18.

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