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Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
Ca At War
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Ca At War

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  • San Franciscans celebrate Japan's surrender, August 16, 1945. On that day, the news of the Japanese surrender had reached the West Coast. Thousands of service people and civilians filled Market Street. One sailor climbed onto a taxi to dance for the crowd. As the celebration continued, it went bad, and turned into a riot. Fist fights broke out. Women were attacked. Windows and street lights were smashed, and stores were looted. On the night of the Japanese surrender, service people and civilians built bonfires in the San Francisco streets. Long after midnight, the local police and the military police were still in the streets. They sent people home, closed bars, and arrested those who drank too much.
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  • Slide 28: The United Nations Charter Conference in San Francisco, 1945. San Francisco was honored to be selected as the site for this world-wide conference. The UN was officially brought into being at this time. Fifty-one member countries approved its charter by October of that year.
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  • Slide 26-27: San Franciscans celebrate Japan's surrender, August 16, 1945. On that day, the news of the Japanese surrender had reached the West Coast. Thousands of service people and civilians filled Market Street. One sailor climbed onto a taxi to dance for the crowd. As the celebration continued, it went bad, and turned into a riot. Fist fights broke out. Women were attacked. Windows and street lights were smashed, and stores were looted. On the night of the Japanese surrender, service people and civilians built bonfires in the San Francisco streets. Long after midnight, the local police and the military police were still in the streets. They sent people home, closed bars, and arrested those who drank too much.
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  • Slide 25: Alleged 'Zoot Suit rioters' leave a Los Angeles jail for a court appearance, 1943. The trial of the rioters was unusual. Judge Charles W. Fricke would not allow the defendants to cut their hair or change their 'zoot suit' clothes, even though they were going to be in jail for months. The sheriff's department offered 'evidence' claiming to show that people of Spanish or Indian heritage were more likely to be violent. The court verdict was against the rioters. Following the trial, the Sleepy Lagoon Defense Committee helped to support an appeal to higher courts. In October 1944 the convictions were thrown out by the appeals court. It ruled that racial ~prejudice~ and improper handling of the case had resulted in an unfair trial. Years later, playwright and actor Luis Valdez produced Zoot Suit, a play based on the incident and the riots that broke out in 1943.
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  • Slide 24: A scene in a zoot suit riot between Mexican American youths and U.S. servicemen, 1943. Fights between white servicemen and ~Hispanic~ zoot suiters peaked in June of that year. Gangs of military men, and later civilians, roamed the streets in search of Mexican American youths. They beat up those youths during a ten-day period that became known as the zoot suit riots. Local police did little to stop the violence. The military moved to keep servicemen out of the city to help restore order. The city officials did not want to admit how serious these fights were. Police Chief C.B. Horall acknowledged that 'Quite a few boys had their clothes torn off, but the crowds weren't particularly hard to handle. And the feeling in general among them [the rioters] was one of fun and sport rather than malice.' No one was killed during the violence, but those actions provided more proof of racism in Los Angeles. Time magazine described this as the 'ugliest brand of riot action since the coolie race riots of the 1870s.' It criticized city officials for not taking action to prevent or stop the fighting.
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