The Social Revolution: How Journalists Can Build Relationships in the Digital Age
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This was a presentation for Write for Arkansas, a great program that supports journalists across the state. The presentation focuses on ways journalists can benefit from the use of social media - for ...

This was a presentation for Write for Arkansas, a great program that supports journalists across the state. The presentation focuses on ways journalists can benefit from the use of social media - for engaging their community, becoming community managers, connecting with sources and breaking news.

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  • The conversation prism outlines where conversations are taking place online. From blog communities to Twitter to reviews and ratings to video and pictures. \n\nBut don’t let this slide overwhelm you. You don’t need to be in all of these places - in fact, I don’t think you’d be thinking very strategically if you just started opening accounts and diving in. \n\n
  • These are some of the most popular social media tools right now. You heard Brant discuss some of these. I personally have had a lot of success with some of these individually and as a combination. Towards the end of my presentation I’ll take you through a local case study where we’ve integrated several of these tools. \n
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  • Yes, we’re going to get to all the fun stuff like Twitter and Facebook and where to start, but first you’ve got to ask yourself what your goal is? What are the measurable objectives you want to achieve?\n\nWhat do you want to do? I’m from the PR world, so often our goals are things such as raising awareness about a product or service, better engaging customers with the product, improving customer service, etc. Or is your sole goal to stand out in the crowd, to have a voice, to move the needle?\n\n
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  • Think through ....\n\nSome tools are better than others for achieving different missions. Read about technology, talk to users, and conduct small experiments. Faily safely. Fail small. Don’t talk big - and expensive - risks.\n
  • Think through ....\n\nSome tools are better than others for achieving different missions. Read about technology, talk to users, and conduct small experiments. Faily safely. Fail small. Don’t talk big - and expensive - risks.\n
  • Think through ....\n\nSome tools are better than others for achieving different missions. Read about technology, talk to users, and conduct small experiments. Faily safely. Fail small. Don’t talk big - and expensive - risks.\n
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  • In partnership with Chadwick Martin Bailey\n
  • In partnership with Chadwick Martin Bailey\n
  • In partnership with Chadwick Martin Bailey\n
  • Yes, we’re going to get to all the fun stuff like Twitter and Facebook and where to start, but first you’ve got to ask yourself what your goal is? What are the measurable objectives you want to achieve?\n\nWhat do you want to do? I’m from the PR world, so often our goals are things such as raising awareness about a product or service, better engaging customers with the product, improving customer service, etc. Or is your sole goal to stand out in the crowd, to have a voice, to move the needle?\n\n
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  • Social media is just a newer version of the Business After Hours scene. It’s networking, building relationships, and eventually selling something (a product, an idea, a service). \n\nYou let down your hair a bit, meet people and chat.\n\nParties don’t always lead to business deals that evening, but nurturing the connections might eventually bear fruit.\n
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  • Social media is just a newer version of the Business After Hours scene. It’s networking, building relationships, and eventually selling something (a product, an idea, a service). \n\nYou let down your hair a bit, meet people and chat.\n\nParties don’t always lead to business deals that evening, but nurturing the connections might eventually bear fruit.\n
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  • Social media is just a newer version of the Business After Hours scene. It’s networking, building relationships, and eventually selling something (a product, an idea, a service). \n\nYou let down your hair a bit, meet people and chat.\n\nParties don’t always lead to business deals that evening, but nurturing the connections might eventually bear fruit.\n
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  • Social media is just a newer version of the Business After Hours scene. It’s networking, building relationships, and eventually selling something (a product, an idea, a service). \n\nYou let down your hair a bit, meet people and chat.\n\nParties don’t always lead to business deals that evening, but nurturing the connections might eventually bear fruit.\n
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  • Social media is just a newer version of the Business After Hours scene. It’s networking, building relationships, and eventually selling something (a product, an idea, a service). \n\nYou let down your hair a bit, meet people and chat.\n\nParties don’t always lead to business deals that evening, but nurturing the connections might eventually bear fruit.\n
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  • A multimedia production studio in their pocket - can shoot and edit and then upload directly to a newsroom or an automated video podcasting system. Encourage not only the journalists, but the community to contribute on the go.\n
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  • Think through ....\n\nSome tools are better than others for achieving different missions. Read about technology, talk to users, and conduct small experiments. Faily safely. Fail small. Don’t talk big - and expensive - risks.\n
  • Think through ....\n\nSome tools are better than others for achieving different missions. Read about technology, talk to users, and conduct small experiments. Faily safely. Fail small. Don’t talk big - and expensive - risks.\n
  • Think through ....\n\nSome tools are better than others for achieving different missions. Read about technology, talk to users, and conduct small experiments. Faily safely. Fail small. Don’t talk big - and expensive - risks.\n
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The Social Revolution: How Journalists Can Build Relationships in the Digital Age Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Write for ArkansasApril 7, 2011 The Social Revolution How Journalists Can BuildRelationships in the Digital Age
  • 2. architecture of news is shattering
  • 3. architecture of news is shattering tearing down traditional barriers and building new VIRTUAL platforms
  • 4. architecture of news is shattering we consume content in social and personalized ways tearing down traditional barriers and building new VIRTUAL platforms
  • 5. architecture of news is shattering we consume content in social and personalized ways the future of social media in journalism will see the death of “social media” tearing down traditional barriers and building new VIRTUAL platforms
  • 6. architecture of news is shattering we consume content in social and personalized ways the future of social media in journalism will see the death of “social media” tearing down traditional barriers and building new VIRTUAL platforms ceding editorial control
  • 7. architecture of news is shattering we consume content in social and personalized ways the future of social media in journalism will see the death of “social media” tearing down traditional barriers and building new VIRTUAL platforms embedded with the COMMUNITY more than ever ceding editorial control
  • 8. More Than 600 Million Monthly Active Users on FacebookArkansas has 896,900 Facebook users (31% of thepopulation)10 Billion+ Tweets Sent on Twitter Since 2006126 Million Blogs2 Billion Videos Streamed on YouTube Every Day
  • 9. More Than 600 Million Monthly Active Users on FacebookArkansas has 896,900 Facebook users (31% of thepopulation)10 Billion+ Tweets Sent on Twitter Since 2006126 Million Blogs2 Billion Videos Streamed on YouTube Every Day
  • 10. Changing Media Landscape
  • 11. Approximately 151newspapers closed in 2010 – half of the number of 2009’s folds. - Vocus 2011 State of the Media
  • 12. Many of the survivors were community newspapers thatunderstood how to successfully connect with their readers online and in print. - Vocus 2011 State of the Media
  • 13. Out of 724 online launches this year, all but 36 were Patch.com sites. - Vocus 2011 State of the Media
  • 14. “New technology was more prevalent as a wayfor media – both traditional and new – to breaknews more quickly. The Web is now clearly thefirst place of publication.”“How News Happens,” Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence inJournalism
  • 15. Americans spend nearly a quarter of their timeonline on social networking sites and blogs, up from 15.8 percent just a year ago (43% increase). - Nielsen August 2010 Report
  • 16. More than half of all Americans ages 12 andolder are on Facebook - 51% of every teen, man or woman has a profile!45% of all Americans age 12 and older say the Internet is their most essential medium. - “The Infinite Dial 2011: Navigating Digital Platforms,” Arbitron and Edison Research
  • 17. Fully 46% of people now say they get news online at least three times a week, surpassingnewspapers (40%) for the first time. Only localTV news is a more popular platform in America now (50%). Nearly half of all Americans (47%) now get some form of local news on a mobile device. - Pew Internet and American Life Project
  • 18. The Scene
  • 19. Engaging Your Community
  • 20. “We think of ourselves not as an onlinenewspaper but as an engine of engagement. Our job is not just to toss information at people butto figure out how we can serve them better. That means meeting them where they are and in whatever way they find convenient. - Margaret Wolf Freivogel, editor and founder of the St. Louis Beacon
  • 21. So how do you build community?
  • 22. So how do you build community?Listening online and offline
  • 23. So how do you build community?Listening online and offlineHelping people connect to each other
  • 24. So how do you build community?Listening online and offlineHelping people connect to each otherCeding part of your editorial control tothe community (“citizen journalists,”bloggers, content contributors throughsocial media)
  • 25. “Journalists need to give up their self-adorationas the authority on the topics they write about. Members of any community are the experts inwhat they are experiencing and seeing on given topics.”- Michele McLellan, journalist and consultant working with the Knight Foundation and Knight Digital Center
  • 26. Journalists asCommunity Managers
  • 27. It’s about managing andAMPLIFYING conversations that will happen with or without you.
  • 28. Creating communities online (whetherthrough Ning.com, your own platform orTumblr)
  • 29. Creating communities online (whetherthrough Ning.com, your own platform orTumblr)Using tools such as Twitter, Instagram andYouTube to engage audiences beyond thestory (behind the scenes of the reporting)
  • 30. Creating communities online (whetherthrough Ning.com, your own platform orTumblr)Using tools such as Twitter, Instagram andYouTube to engage audiences beyond thestory (behind the scenes of the reporting)Fostering an active comment section (goodexample in Arkansas: Arkansas Blog atarktimes.com)
  • 31. Smaller Indiana
  • 32. Community Sports Desk
  • 33. CNN’s Twitter Buzz
  • 34. ProPublica Tumblog
  • 35. Newsweek Tumblr.
  • 36. Los Angeles Time Tumblr.
  • 37. http://instagr.am
  • 38. http://instagram.heroku.com/users/npr
  • 39. NPR’s Weekend Edition Social Media Study
  • 40. NPR’s Weekend Edition Social Media StudyListeners have alerted reporters of stories,suggested questions for guests and havebecome a part of the program in ways notpossible a year ago.
  • 41. NPR’s Weekend Edition Social Media StudyListeners have alerted reporters of stories,suggested questions for guests and havebecome a part of the program in ways notpossible a year ago.Findings: Longer listeners followed WE onFacebook and/or Twitter, the morepositive their opinions of the show andNPR, listened more
  • 42. NPR’s Weekend Edition Social Media StudyListeners have alerted reporters of stories,suggested questions for guests and havebecome a part of the program in ways notpossible a year ago.Findings: Longer listeners followed WE onFacebook and/or Twitter, the morepositive their opinions of the show andNPR, listened moreListeners engaging online have becomemore loyal to the program.
  • 43. Connectingwith Sources
  • 44. 89% of journalists turn to blogs for storyresearch
  • 45. 89% of journalists turn to blogs for storyresearch 65% turn to social networks sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn
  • 46. 89% of journalists turn to blogs for storyresearch 65% turn to social networks sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn 61% to Wikipedia
  • 47. 89% of journalists turn to blogs for storyresearch 65% turn to social networks sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn 61% to Wikipedia 52% to microblogging services such as Twitter
  • 48. 89% of journalists turn to blogs for storyresearch 65% turn to social networks sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn 61% to Wikipedia 52% to microblogging services such as Twitter 69% of journalists reporting and producing stories for websites found social media most important
  • 49. 89% of journalists turn to blogs for storyresearch 65% turn to social networks sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn 61% to Wikipedia 52% to microblogging services such as Twitter 69% of journalists reporting and producing stories for websites found social media most important while traditional print journalists found social media less important (48%)
  • 50. 89% of journalists turn to blogs for storyresearch 65% turn to social networks sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn 61% to Wikipedia 52% to microblogging services such as Twitter 69% of journalists reporting and producing stories for websites found social media most important Source: Cison while traditional print journalists 2010 Survey with George Washington found social media less important (48%) University
  • 51. Twitter
  • 52. @helpareporter
  • 53. @ProfNet
  • 54. #journchat
  • 55. LinkedIn
  • 56. Profiles of Sources
  • 57. Search Groups
  • 58. Facebook
  • 59. The Courier Facebook Page
  • 60. Skype
  • 61. Adds a Visual Element to Your Online Story
  • 62. FriendFeed/Quora
  • 63. www.friendfeed.com
  • 64. www.quora.com
  • 65. Breaking News
  • 66. For the week of March 14-18, a full 64% of blog links, 32% of Twitternews links and the top 20 YouTube news videos were about Japan’scatastrophic earthquake, according to the New Media Index from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism,
  • 67. 1 in 2 Americans will have asmartphone by Christmas 2011,according to Nielsen research.
  • 68. Write for Arkansas April 7, 2011 This means that journalists andcommunity contributors will be able to break news like never before,using a whole host of apps on their smartphones.
  • 69. 1st Video iPhone App
  • 70. Ethicsto Consider
  • 71. As the old journalists’ adage goes ... if your mother says she loves you, check it out. The same goes fortweets, status updates and wall posts.
  • 72. Assume that your professional life and yourpersonal life merge online regardless ofattempt to keep them separate! Don’t writeor post anything that would embarrass yourcompany.
  • 73. Assume that your professional life and yourpersonal life merge online regardless ofattempt to keep them separate! Don’t writeor post anything that would embarrass yourcompany.Assume that everything you write or video ispublic and knowable to everyone with accessto a computer.
  • 74. Assume that your professional life and yourpersonal life merge online regardless ofattempt to keep them separate! Don’t writeor post anything that would embarrass yourcompany.Assume that everything you write or video ispublic and knowable to everyone with accessto a computer.Don’t friend confidential sources or get intoWeb-related arguments with critics (new WallStreet Journal rules for online conduct)
  • 75. Follow TheseJournalists Who “Get It”
  • 76. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post
  • 77. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff
  • 78. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times
  • 79. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelter
  • 80. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelterScott Simon, NPR’s Weekend Edition
  • 81. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelterScott Simon, NPR’s Weekend Edition@nprscottsimon
  • 82. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelterRoger Ebert, Chicago Sun TimesScott Simon, NPR’s Weekend Edition@nprscottsimon
  • 83. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelterRoger Ebert, Chicago Sun Times@ebertchicagoScott Simon, NPR’s Weekend Edition@nprscottsimon
  • 84. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelterRoger Ebert, Chicago Sun Times@ebertchicago Howard Kurtz, Daily BeastScott Simon, NPR’s Weekend Edition@nprscottsimon
  • 85. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelterRoger Ebert, Chicago Sun Times@ebertchicago Howard Kurtz, Daily Beast @howardkurtzScott Simon, NPR’s Weekend Edition@nprscottsimon
  • 86. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelterRoger Ebert, Chicago Sun Times@ebertchicago Howard Kurtz, Daily Beast @howardkurtzScott Simon, NPR’s Weekend Edition@nprscottsimon Lance Turner, Arkansas Business
  • 87. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelterRoger Ebert, Chicago Sun Times@ebertchicago Howard Kurtz, Daily Beast @howardkurtzScott Simon, NPR’s Weekend Edition@nprscottsimon Lance Turner, Arkansas Business @lt
  • 88. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelter DavidRoger Ebert, Chicago Sun Times Goins, Fox 16@ebertchicago Howard Kurtz, Daily Beast @howardkurtzScott Simon, NPR’s Weekend Edition@nprscottsimon Lance Turner, Arkansas Business @lt
  • 89. Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post@ariannahuff Brian Stelter, New York Times @brianstelter DavidRoger Ebert, Chicago Sun Times Goins, Fox 16@ebertchicago @Doins Howard Kurtz, Daily Beast @howardkurtzScott Simon, NPR’s Weekend Edition@nprscottsimon Lance Turner, Arkansas Business @lt
  • 90. Natalie Ghidotti, APR @ghidotti linkedin.com/in/natalieghidottinatalie@ghidotticommunications.com