Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Subjects and predicates
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Subjects and predicates

17,986

Published on

Grammar Lesson for A Walk in the Desert

Grammar Lesson for A Walk in the Desert

0 Comments
10 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
17,986
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
501
Comments
0
Likes
10
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Subjects and Predicates A Grammar Lesson for Fourth Grade Created by Teresa Wilson – Desert Palms - July 2010
  • 2. Every sentence is made up of two parts.
    • The subject names the person, place, or thing the sentence is about (the WHO or WHAT.)
    • The predicate tells what the subject is or does (the ACTION.)
  • 3. The Subject
    • The complete subject includes all the words that identify the person or thing the sentence is about.
    • My Aunt Mary has a cat.
    • The little old man walked with a cane.
    • The simple subject is the main noun or pronoun.
    • The boy with the blue shirt waved to me.
    • Jack loves to play soccer.
  • 4. The Predicate
    • The complete predicate includes all words that tell what the subject of the sentence is or does.
    • Tim took three marbles from the pile.
    • The simple predicate is the
    • main verb or verb phrase.
  • 5. Let’s Review
    • Share with your shoulder partner the difference between a complete subject and a simple subject .
    • Share with your shoulder partner the difference between a complete predicate and a simple predicate .
    A quick coyote A quick coyote caught a lizard. A quick coyote caught a lizard. caught a lizard.
  • 6. Sentences can have more than one subject or predicate.
    • A compound subject is two or more subjects with the same predicate.
      • The subjects are usually joined by and or or .
      • Stacey and her brother went to the park.
    • A compound predicate is two or more predicates with the same subject.
      • The simple predicates in a compound predicate are usually joined by and, but, or or .
      • Stacey and her brother went to the park and
      • played frisbee .
  • 7. Mechanics and Usage
    • If a compound subject has two subjects, the subjects are not separated by a comma.
    • If it has three or more subjects, they are separated by commas.
    • Josh , Carrie , and Meg went fishing.
  • 8. Mechanics and Usage
    • If a compound predicate has two predicates, the predicates are not separated by a comma.
    • If it has three or more predicates, they are separated by commas.
    • Tonight we will eat , read ,
    • and play games.

×