Multilingual Marketing
Communicating Locally to Succeed Globally
Presented by
The Globalization and Localization Associati...
Today’s Topic…
Regional Localization and
Cultural Issues: Latin America
Fabiano Cid
What you MIGHT know
about Latin America
What you SHOULD know
about Latin America
What you SHOULD know
about Latin America
• 15% of the world’s oil reserves
• ¼ of the arable land (much of it unused)
• 30...
A Uniform Region
 Democracy reigns
 Economy is booming
 Increased purchasing power
 2 Languages only
 Cultural simila...
× Political instability remains
× Highly dependent on
commodities
× Inequality is still high
× French, Dutch, English, Cre...
To whom do you want to sell?
• B2B
– More “internationalized”
– The MultiLatinas
• B2G
– Defense, infrastructure, IT, phar...
To whom do you want to sell?
• B2B
– More “internationalized”
– The MultiLatinas
• B2G
– Defense, infrastructure, IT, phar...
Spanish Variants
Spanish Variant Sub-variant Countries /
Regions Spoken
Main Features
Latin American
Spanish
1. Caribbean ...
Spanish Variants (cont.)
Spanish Variant Sub-
variant
Countries /
Regions
Spoken
Main Features
Mid-Atlantic
Spanish
(Casti...
Examples
English LA:
Caribbean
LA: Central
American
LA:
Mexican
LA:
Southern
Cone
Mid-
Atlantic
US Spanish International
a...
The Brazilian Middle Class
• Income grew from $7.2K to 31.2K in 5 years
• In 2008:
– 49% of the population (90 mil people)...
The Brazilian Middle Class
Packaging Examples
Brand in Portuguese
Language mixture
International brand
Distinct languages
Local brand
Single language
Brazil, Land of Opportunities
• 1/3 of the population; 40% of Latin America’s GDP
• World Cup and Olympics
• Investments i...
Brazil, Land of Opportunities
Takeaways
• We don’t speak Portuguese
– But rather Brazilian Portuguese
• We’re not Latinos
– We identify more with our ne...
For more information
www.thinklatinamerica.com
www.ccaps.net/newsletter/11-07/newsletteren.h
Thank you!
Fabiano Cid
Managing Director
fcid@ccaps.net
Ccaps Translation and Localization
+55 (21) 2507-5989
Rua da Assem...
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Multilingual Marketing for Exporters - Latin America

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GALA joint presentation to a select group of exporters at the Washington State Department of Commerce on the challenges and opportunities in the Latin American region with a focus on Brazil.

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Multilingual Marketing for Exporters - Latin America

  1. 1. Multilingual Marketing Communicating Locally to Succeed Globally Presented by The Globalization and Localization Association In conjunction with the Washington State Department of Commerce and enterpriseSeattle
  2. 2. Today’s Topic…
  3. 3. Regional Localization and Cultural Issues: Latin America Fabiano Cid
  4. 4. What you MIGHT know about Latin America
  5. 5. What you SHOULD know about Latin America
  6. 6. What you SHOULD know about Latin America • 15% of the world’s oil reserves • ¼ of the arable land (much of it unused) • 30% of the world’s fresh water • By 2025, income at $22K a year per person • Fastest growing regional trade partner, with 82% growth between 1998 and 2009 • The “Latin American decade”
  7. 7. A Uniform Region  Democracy reigns  Economy is booming  Increased purchasing power  2 Languages only  Cultural similarities with US
  8. 8. × Political instability remains × Highly dependent on commodities × Inequality is still high × French, Dutch, English, Creole and indigenous languages × Very proud of their heritage  Democracy reigns  Economy is booming  Increased purchasing power  2 Languages only  Cultural similarities with US But let’s not generalize…
  9. 9. To whom do you want to sell? • B2B – More “internationalized” – The MultiLatinas • B2G – Defense, infrastructure, IT, pharma, clean energy • B2C – Upper Classes – Middle Classes – Lower Classes
  10. 10. To whom do you want to sell? • B2B – More “internationalized” – The MultiLatinas • B2G – Defense, infrastructure, IT, pharma, clean energy • B2C – Upper Classes – Middle Classes – Lower Classes
  11. 11. Spanish Variants Spanish Variant Sub-variant Countries / Regions Spoken Main Features Latin American Spanish 1. Caribbean Cuba Dominican Republic Puerto Rico Courtesy treatment is “usted” yet “tú” is widely spread for familiar use. Pronunciation: slower and more relaxed. 2. Central American Bolivia, Colombia Costa Rica, Ecuador Nicaragua, Panama Peru, Venezuela Courtesy treatment: “usted.” Borrowings from quechua. 3. Mexican El Salvador Guatemala Honduras Mexico Courtesy treatment: “usted” + verbal form for “vosotros” or “tú”. Also “vos” in some parts. Borrowings from US English, náhuatl, maya- quiché. 4. Southern Cone Argentina Chile Paraguay Uruguay Courtesy treatment: “vos” + verbal form for “tú.” Borrowings from guaraní.
  12. 12. Spanish Variants (cont.) Spanish Variant Sub- variant Countries / Regions Spoken Main Features Mid-Atlantic Spanish (Castilian) Spain Courtesy treatment is “usted.” Familiar treatment is “tú”, except in some cases such as in the Canary Islands. Borrowings from European languages US Spanish United States This variant includes the highest percentage of borrowings from US English with regard to the remaining variants. Depending on the origin of the group of speakers, the main features mentioned above for other variants will be reflected on the speech of Spanish speakers from the US. Other Philippines, Guinea Equatorial International /Universal or Neutral Spanish Acceptable (i.e. not identifiable as written for another regional market) throughout the Spanish-speaking world.* Solves the vocabulary conflict with a careful selection of terms, without inventing or imposing nonexistent terms, or terms that are phonetically or grammatically not viable. Communicates precisely without being offensive and without sounding foreign.
  13. 13. Examples English LA: Caribbean LA: Central American LA: Mexican LA: Southern Cone Mid- Atlantic US Spanish International access accesar (la cuenta) acceder acceder acceder acceder ganar acceso tener acceso answering machine contestadora contestadora contestadora contestadora automática contestador automático contestadora central de mensajes car carro carro carro auto coche carro automóvil drive (to) manejar manejar manejar manejar conducir manejar N/A enter ingresar ingresar ingresar ingresar introducir ingresar introducir lunch almuerzo almuerzo almuerzo almuerzo comida almuerzo almuerzo PC computadora computador a computador a computador a computador* *Chile ordenador computador a equipo sistema PC potato papa papa papa papa patata papa N/A training capacitación adiestramient capacitación capacitación formación capacitació n aprendizaje entrenamient o
  14. 14. The Brazilian Middle Class • Income grew from $7.2K to 31.2K in 5 years • In 2008: – 49% of the population (90 mil people) – 46% of all income • By 2015: – 56% of all population with – 54% of the purchasing power
  15. 15. The Brazilian Middle Class
  16. 16. Packaging Examples Brand in Portuguese Language mixture International brand Distinct languages Local brand Single language
  17. 17. Brazil, Land of Opportunities • 1/3 of the population; 40% of Latin America’s GDP • World Cup and Olympics • Investments in infrastructure • Growing purchasing power • Ageing population • Technology is key • Improved education
  18. 18. Brazil, Land of Opportunities
  19. 19. Takeaways • We don’t speak Portuguese – But rather Brazilian Portuguese • We’re not Latinos – We identify more with our neighbors up North • We’re not a single country – The real melting pot • We’re not that friendly and flexible – “Localize” your product or service
  20. 20. For more information www.thinklatinamerica.com www.ccaps.net/newsletter/11-07/newsletteren.h
  21. 21. Thank you! Fabiano Cid Managing Director fcid@ccaps.net Ccaps Translation and Localization +55 (21) 2507-5989 Rua da Assembleia, 10/1906 Rio de Janeiro – RJ Brazil

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