Community Management Presentation

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David Eaves Presentation from the Free Software and Open Source Symposium on Community Management as the Core Competency of Open Source.

David Eaves Presentation from the Free Software and Open Source Symposium on Community Management as the Core Competency of Open Source.

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  • 1. Community Management: Open Source’s Core Competency
  • 2.
    • does not compute
    By David Eaves
  • 3.
    • Open Source
  • 4.
    • Open Source
    • (Public Policy)
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9.  
  • 10.
    • Negotiation
    Conflict Management Facilitation Collaborative Decision Making Difficult Conversations Strategy
  • 11.  
  • 12.  
  • 13.
    • Mozilla ≠ Software Company
    • (Legacy OrgWare)
  • 14.
    • Mozilla =
    • Community Management Organization
  • 15.
    • “ Firefox represents a community of people who have a vision for the internet”
    • “ Our organization is community”
      • Mitchell Baker
  • 16.
    • “How do we take open source to scale?”
    • “How do we take open source to other areas (marketing, strategy, etc…)”
  • 17.
    • Community Management
    • Means
    • Enabling the Community
  • 18.
    • The Challenge
  • 19.
    • The Challenge
    • People often don’t agree
  • 20.
    • There is a code to understanding collaboration
    2007 by David Eaves
  • 21. Harvard Negotiation Project If “Yes” Commitment If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship
  • 22. Interests
  • 23. Interests Options
  • 24. Interests Options Legitimacy
  • 25. Interests Options Legitimacy
  • 26. Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship
  • 27. If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship
  • 28. Harvard Negotiation Project If “Yes” Commitment If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship
  • 29. Harvard Negotiation Project Leave it! Commitment Take it… or Alternatives (BATNA)
  • 30. Harvard Negotiation Project If “Yes” Commitment If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship
  • 31. If “Yes” Commitment If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship Harvard Negotiation Project
  • 32.
    • That’s great.
  • 33.
    • That’s great .
  • 34.
    • That’s great! 
  • 35. If “Yes” Commitment If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship Harvard Negotiation Project
  • 36. If “Yes” Commitment If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship Harvard Negotiation Project
  • 37. If “Yes” Commitment If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship Harvard Negotiation Project
  • 38. If “Yes” Commitment If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship Harvard Negotiation Project
  • 39. If “Yes” Commitment If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship Harvard Negotiation Project
  • 40.
    • Poor communication
    • and/or
    • weak relationships
    • feed
    • dysfunctional assumptions
  • 41.
      • I have all the relevant information
      • If they knew what I knew, they’d think differently
      • They are probably crazy, evil or stupid
  • 42.
    • Meta Conversation
    • around
    • IDENTITY
  • 43.
    • Meta Conversation
    • around
    • IDENTITY
    • being right = being smart
    • (or, at least, smarter than them)
  • 44.
    • The audience member speaking is a professor at Seneca sharing how his students reach out and join open-source communities but often have a negative initial experience and so give up.
    • Consequently his students end up forming parallel but separate open-source forums and communities.
  • 45.
    • Inquire:
      • Ask questions to learn information
    • Paraphrase:
      • Summarizing what you think they said
    • Acknowledge:
      • Their view or feelings (without agreeing, per se)
    • Advocate:
      • Explain your point of view
  • 46.
    • THOSE OF US WHO WORK IN FREE
    • AND OPEN SOFTWARE PROJECTS
    • OFTEN
    • ARGUE AGGRESIVELY OR WALK
    • AWAY INSTEAD OF FIRST USING
    • OUR POWERS OF PERSUASION TO
    • AFFECT
    • A FAIR OUTCOME THAT FULLY
    • SATISFIES ALL OF THE COMMUNITY’S
    • DIFFERING INTERESTS
  • 47.  
  • 48.
    • THOSE O F US WHO WORK IN F REE
    • AND OPEN SO F TWARE PROJECTS
    • O F TEN
    • ARGUE AGGRESIVELY OR WALK
    • AWAY INSTEAD O F F IRST USING
    • OUR POWERS O F PERSUASION TO
    • A FF ECT
    • A F AIR OUTCOME THAT F ULLY
    • SATIS F IES ALL O F THE COMMUNITY’S
    • DI FF ERING INTERESTS
  • 49.
    • Aoccdrnig to rsaeerch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rgiht pclae.
    • You can sltil raed it wouthit a big porbelm bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.
    • Tihs aslo eixaplns, at laest in prat, why so mnay of you messid so mnay of the letetr Fs. Yuor mnid saw the wolhe wrod, not ecah lteter, eevn tuohgh taht was the tsak!
  • 50. I’m right No idiot, I’m right
  • 51. My Conclusions Their Conclusions SHARE ASK My Conclusions DATA POOL DATA POOL From Argyris & Schon
  • 52. My Conclusions My Interpretations Their Interpretations Their Conclusions SHARE ASK SHARE ASK My Conclusions My Interpretations DATA POOL DATA POOL From Argyris & Schon
  • 53. SHARE ASK SHARE ASK SHARE ASK My Conclusions My Interpretations Their Interpretations Data I noticed Data they noticed DATA POOL Their Conclusions DATA POOL From Argyris & Schon
  • 54.
    • Changing the Game
  • 55.
    • 1. Tools
    • 2. Leadership
    • 3. Culture
  • 56.
    • 1. Tools
  • 57.
    • What do we mean by tools?
  • 58. If “Yes” Commitment If “No” Alternatives (BATNA) Interests Options Legitimacy Communication Relationship Harvard Negotiation Project
  • 59.
    • Bugzilla – doing some things well
    Model Behaviour Set examples Establish norms
  • 60.
    • Bugzilla – making it better
    Ask Why… Drive at interests Why should the software perform this way
  • 61.
    • Where is the Bugzilla for non-software problems?
  • 62.
    • 2. Leadership
  • 63.
    • Be the change you want to see in the world.
    • - Ghandi
  • 64.
    • Inquire:
      • Ask questions to learn information
    • Paraphrase:
      • Summarizing what you think they said
    • Acknowledge:
      • Their view or feelings (without agreeing, per se)
    • Advocate:
      • Explain your point of view
  • 65.
    • Facilitation is your
    • core competency
    • Hire
    • Train
    • Compensate
    • Bonus
  • 66.
    • 3. Culture
  • 67.
    • In order to persuade
    • you must be
    • open to persuasion
  • 68.
    • Ideas are fragile
    • Egos are fragile
    • Create a safe space to share
  • 69.
    • Culture can be shaped
    • Be proactive
    • Choose your
    • community values
    • Create tools and hire leaders
    • that honor the culture
    • and serve the community
  • 70.
    • David Eaves
    • www.eaves.ca
    • [email_address]
    • This presentation contains thoughtware provided by:
    • Mike Beltzner
    • John Lilly
    • Mark Surman
    • The Canada25 community
    • The authors of Getting to Yes
    • The authors of Difficult Conversations
    • The Harvard Negotiation Project
    • Chris Argyris
    • Dr. Graham Rawlinson