Practical experiences and best practices for SSD and IBM i

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Practical experiences and best practices for SSD and IBM i

  1. 1. IBM What’s the value and how to optimize Performance with SSD and IBM i Gottfried Schimunek 3605 Highway 52 North Senior Architect Rochester, MN 55901 Application Design IBM STG Software Tel 507-253-2367 Development Fax 845-491-2347 Lab Services Gottfried@us.ibm.com IBM ISV Enablement Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM CorporationAcknowledgements Thanks to Mark Olson, IBM WW Product Manager for providing this comprehensive and detailed presentation2 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  2. 2. Agenda SSD introduction/overview Implementing hot/cold Performance insights Roadmap for Power Systems SSD SSD reference material3 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM CorporationSolid State Drive (Flash Technology) Processors Memory Disk SSD Very, very, Very, very, Very, very slow very, very, very fast comparatively very fast Fast 1,000,000 - < 10’s ns ~100 ns ~200,000 ns 8,000,000 ns Access Speed There is a huge gap between memory and disk speed4 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  3. 3. New Solid State Drive (Flash Technology) Processors Memory Disk SSD Very, very, Very, very, Very, very slow very, very, very fast comparatively very fast Fast 1,000,000 - < 10’s ns ~100 ns ~200,000 ns 8,000,000 ns Access Speed ~33 ~ 12.5 ~1 second minutes hours Human Time Context5 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM CorporationBasic Problem --- Disk “Slowing” Down (Relatively) Seagate 15k RPM/3.5" Drive Specifications +35% 450 Capacity (GB) Max Sustained 171 DR (MB/s) +15% Read Seek (ms) 73 75 3.6 -1% 3.4 2002 2008 Capacity growing ok (35% per year), but Read/Seek -1% & Data Rate only 15% per year While processors & memory speed up and add threads and cache Net … a growing imbalanced between disk and processor/memory6 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  4. 4. 177GB eMLC SSD Performance Latency - IO OPERATIONS PER SECOND Throughput Response (IOPS) (MB/s) Time (ms) Random Random Random Mixed Single Power SSD Read Write Read Write 70% Read / Read 30% Write 177GB 2.5” SSD 15 k 4k 11 k 170 MB 64 MB .25 ms in SAS SFF bays For grins … 0.12 - 0.4 0.12 - 0.4 0.12 - 0.4 ~175 ~200 8.3 – 2.5 15k rpm HDD k k k MB MB ms Note these are drive specific measurements and projections which can vary from what you might experience. The values assume 528 byte sectors running RAID-0 with no protection. Hypothetically if measured with unsupported 512 byte sectors, values would be higher. The values are highly workload dependent. Factors such as read/write mix, random/non-random data, drive cache hits/misses, data compressibility in the drive controller, large/small block, type of RAID or mirroring protection, etc will change these values. These values produced by a server with plenty of processor, memory and controller resources to push this much I/O into the SSD. Most client system applications don’t push SSD nearly this hard.7 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM CorporationSSD Price Performance Processors Memory Disk SSD Very, very, Very, very, Very, very slow very, very, very fast comparatively very fast Fast $/GB $/IOP Power 740 (Max 512GB memory) One 32GB Memory feature = $6,390 One 15k HDD = ~200 IOPS* = $199.69 per GB = $2.49 / IOPS One 177GB SSD = $3,588 One 177GB SSD = ~11,000 IOPS* = $20.27 per GB = $0.33 / IOPS SSD only 10% per GB SSD only 13% per cost of memory IOPS cost of HDD IOPS values vary depending on many configuration and workload variables. The above values are fairly conservative for SSD are represent a 70/30 (read/write) mix. 200 HDD IOPS is better than many HDDs experience. Prices are suggested list prices for a Power 740 and are subject to change. Reseller prices may vary.8 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  5. 5. World Class eMLC SSD Performance Latency - IO OPERATIONS PER SECOND Throughput Response (IOPS) (MB/s) Time (ms) Random Random Random Mixed Single Power SSD Read Write Read Write 70% Read / Read 30% Write 177GB 2.5” SSD 15 k 4k 11 k 170 MB 64 MB .25 ms in SAS SFF bays 387GB 2.5” SSD 39 k 22 k 24 k 340 MB 375 MB .20 ms in SAS SFF bays For grins … 0.12 - 0.4 0.12 - 0.4 0.12 - 0.4 ~175 ~200 8.3 – 2.5 15k rpm HDD k k k MB MB ms Note these are drive specific measurements and projections which can vary from what you might experience. The values assume 528 byte sectors running RAID-0 with no protection. Hypothetically if measured with unsupported 512 byte sectors, values would be higher. The values are highly workload dependent. Factors such as read/write mix, random/non-random data, drive cache hits/misses, data compressibility in the drive controller, large/small block, type of RAID or mirroring protection, etc will change these values. These values produced by a server with plenty of processor, memory and controller resources to push this much I/O into the SSD. Most client system applications don’t push SSD nearly this hard.9 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation SSD Price Performance Processors Memory Disk SSD Very, very, Very, very, Very, very slow very, very, very fast comparatively very fast Fast $/GB $/IOP Power 740 (Max 512GB memory) One 32GB Memory feature = $6,390 One 15k HDD = ~200 IOPS* = $199.69 per GB = $2.49 / IOPS One 387GB SSD = $6,200 One 387GB SSD = ~24,000 IOPS* = $16.02 per GB = $0.26 / IOPS SSD only 8% per GB SSD only 10% per cost of memory IOPS cost of HDD IOPS values vary depending on many configuration and workload variables. The above values are fairly conservative for SSD are represent a 70/30 (read/write) mix. 200 HDD IOPS is better than many HDDs experience. Prices are suggested list prices for a Power 740 and are subject to change. Reseller prices may vary.10 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  6. 6. Power eMLC SSD Performance versus 15k rpm HDD Drive to Drive comparisons SSD offers up to New eMLC SSD HDD is 12X – 41X 66x – 250x more I/O nearly 2X WRITE slower (latency) Operations Per throughput (MB/s) than SSD Second (IOPS) than HDD (milliseconds) 1.8X 41X 250X 1X 125X 12X 66X 33X 1X 1.25X 1X HDD SSD SSD HDD SSD SSD HDD SSD SSD 177GB 387GB 177GB 387GB 177GB 387GB Drive-to-drive compares ignore any caching by SAS controller11 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation It All Stacks Up Depending on the workload, the HDD stack may be much higher on the left. This shows a fairly conservative HDD vs SSD performance comparison PLUS … the PCI slots for the SAS controllers make the HDD stack higher 1/10th Qty HDD 1/20th Qty HDD 1/20th Qty HDD 15k rpm HDD 177 GB SSD 387 GB SSD 387 GB SSD (SFF) (SFF) (SFF) (1.8”)12 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  7. 7. Power Solid State Drive Processors Memory Disk SSD Very, very, Very, very, Very, very slow very, very, very fast comparatively very fast Fast 1,000,000 - < 10’s ns ~100 ns ~200,000 ns 8,000,000 ns Access Speed Sweet spots 1. Batch window reduction for disk bound applications You can cut up to 40-50% off window 2. Response time - transaction/data base for disk bound applications Internal drives or perhaps even SAN drives 3. Analytics Key points -- A modest quantity of SSD can often make a big difference -- Both write-heavy and read-heavy work can be fine for today’s SSD – biggest performance boost for random read workload13 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation SSD Client - Batch Window Reduction Example 1 Associated Bank needed to reduce month end batch run time from 4+ hours to under 3 hours SSDs cut 1.5 hours from batch run time 40% Reduction Plus a 16% reduction in # of disk drives Batch Performance Runs # of SAS # of Batch 5 Disk Drives SSDs Run Time 4 Base run 72 0 4:22 Hours 3 2 SSD run 1 72 8 2:43 1 SSD run 2 60 4 2:48 0 72 HDD 72 HDD + 8 SSD 60 HDD + 4 SSD Placed eight DB2 Objects (table, index, view) on SSD Source: IBM Power Systems Performance and Benchmark Center 5-23-0914 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  8. 8. SSD Client - Batch Window Reduction Example 2 50% Reduction with SSD Customer in health care industry Batch Windows needed to reduce batch windows significantly Daily batch running 10+ hours H o u rs Monthly batch running 30+ hours Added 12 SSDs to 168 HDDs Cut 50% from daily run time Cut 50% from monthly run time . Monthly Daily15 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation SSD Client – Data Warehouse Example SAP Customer using Business 60-87% reductions with Intelligence Warehouse (BW 7.0) SSD installed an all-SSD configuration of about 800GB. 4 days Huge improvement in aggregate builds / compression Significant reductions in queries 87% 20 min reduction 65% reduction 60% 7 min reduction 1/2 day 5 min 2 min HDD SSD HDD SSD HDD SSD Sample query 1 Sample query 2 Sample build/compression16 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  9. 9. SSD Client – Deep Analytics ~85% reductions with SSD Client doing complex financial 48 hour analysis of financial transactions Run combined with WW economical factors. Millions of records. Insights guide client in making tactical and strategic decisions. ~85% reduction Transformed application from “interesting and helpful” to 6-7 hours “critical and essential” HDD SSD Sample build/compression17 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM CorporationSSD Faster Analytics Data Warehouse Faster answers Faster/better decision making -------------------------- SSD example: Leveraging DB2 temp space with Iterative / modest amount of SSD capacity drill-down First query draws data from HDD “relatively slow”, question but data then cached on SSD. Second, third, fourth, etc query MUCH faster !!!! 1 2 When query work of this data ceases, SSD space 3 reused for new queries. 4 Questions/analysis are usually iterative. The first question generates additional drill-down or expanded questions. The raw data for the first question gets reused a lot until the topic exploration is completed. Example – “what am i selling?” “what am i selling in the evening?” “what am i selling in the evening by store?” etc, etc18 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  10. 10. SSD Client Example – IPL Reduction IBM Development has projected Less downtime modest improvement for IBM i and for AIX, but ….. IBM i POWER6 520 client with 16 drives (4 SSD and 12 HDD) Client put load source on SSD Now reporting 3 minute IPLs POWER7 IBM i client also reporting 3 minute IPLs Much faster PTF applications What is your cost per minute or cost per hour for down time? How long is your typical IPL?19 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Many Systems Buy “Extra” Disk Arms for Performance HDD % utilization of capacity is held low to help ensure higher I/O performance and more consistent response time - arm movement, spinning platter an issue Write cache and read cache attempt to buffer the impact Often less than 30-50% full for performance sensitive workloads SSD % utilization of capacity not restricted Can run much closer to 100% full20 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  11. 11. Mixed SSD + HDD Can be Great Solution It is typical for data bases to have a large percentage of data which is infrequently used (“cold”) and a small percentage of data which is frequently used (“hot”) Hot data may be only 10-20% capacity, but represent 80-90% activity SSD offers best price performance when focused on “hot” data HDD offers best storage cost, so focus it on “cold” data …. a hierarchical approach Cold May be able to use larger HDD and/or a larger % capacity used Hot Can run SSD closer to 100% capacity21 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Save Space/Energy/Cooling A few SSD can often replace many HDD Fewer total drives Maybe fewer controllers Fewer I/O drawers Fewer cables I/O drawer maintenance reduction can offset SSD maintenance22 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  12. 12. A Power 740 Scenario (your situation will vary) Acquisition Power 740 Single LPAR IBM i V6R1 9% All HDD, 28 drives, mirrored versus Mixed HDD & SSD, mirrored 12 15k RPM HDDs 4 SAS-bay-based 177GB SSDs All HDD Mix HDD & SSD Achieves similar performance results Maintenance Energy Rack "Us" 22 % 39 40 % % All HDD Mix HDD & SSD All HDD Mix HDD & SSD All HDD Mix HDD & SSD23 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Should You Use SAN/SVC SSD or Internal SSD? Pro’s Con’s Use Internal yes yes SSD Use SAN/SVC yes yes SSD “Internal” = drives located in a system unit, in an I/O drawer with PCI slots or in a disk-only I/O drawer.24 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  13. 13. DAS & SAN - Two Good Options Both options are strategic Both options have their strengths Can use both options on the same server DAS SAN Direct Attached Storage Storage Area Network (“internal”) (“external”) • Fastest (lower • Fast latency) • Multi-server sharing • Typically lower cost • Advanced functions/values Flash Copy, Metro/Global hardware/software Mirror, Live Partition Mobility, • Often simpler config Easy Tier25 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation SSD - SAN/SVC or Internal …. Or Mixed? Pro’s Con’s 1. Lower latency - internal is about 1. If already have SAN/SVC, adds 0.3 milliseconds faster (per access complexity of having internal Use .. it can add up) (can be larger) PLUS SAN/SVC 2. If don’t already have SAN/SVC, Internal lower cost & less learning 2. Reduces value of SAN/SVC high function capabilities – Flash SSD 3. Multiple Config options Copy, MetroMirror, HA, partition 4. Handle just like other internal mobility, etc storage 1. Leverage SAN/SVC well-known 1. If don’t have SAN/SVC, need value proposition of initial SAN/SVC investment in Use manageability, control, hardware, software, skills functionality, performance, etc 2. Many medium/entry SAN/SVCSAN/SVC 2. If already have SAN/SVC, less don’t offer SSD SSD learning, reduced cost to add 3. DS8000 & V7000 EasyTier MIXED: If using a SAN/SVC which doesn’t have SSD, OR if not using the higher function capability of a SAN/SVC (for example you do backup/restore functions just like it was an internal drive); THEN combining internal Power Systems SSD with SAN/SVC storage can be a good thing. “Internal” = drives located in a system unit, in an I/O drawer with PCI slots or in a disk-only I/O drawer.26 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  14. 14. SSD Technology “Myth” “Beware SSD as they wear out as they have a limited number of writes” Key facts to correct myth …. this is not a concern for IBM Power Systems SSD IBM Power Systems SSD are industrial/enterprise drives designed to handle this. Design points are many years of 24x7x365 heavy write workloads. These are not “PC-grade” or “consumer-grade” flash drives. Even if you do somehow “use up all the writes”, the SSD reports status prior to it being a real problem to the server and server sends a message to the operator or to IBM for a future scheduled repair action. This is just like a disk drive reporting a weakening status. Replacement SSD is covered under IBM Maintenance. Just like disk drives, you want to protect contents using system mirroring or RAID protection27 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Agenda SSD introduction/overview Implementing hot/cold Performance insights Roadmap for Power Systems SSD SSD reference material28 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  15. 15. Implementing “Hot” and “Cold” Data AIX IBM i Ability to granularly/flexibly select and locate hot files on SSD #1 Best integrated, automated Key AIX performance tools are filemon capability available in the industry & iostat. today Database vendors provide hot data “Trace and Balance” function part of analysis tools, example: DB2 Snapshot. IBM i – automated in i 7.1 Migrating hot data Monitors by partition or ASP (Aux Migratepv is often useful Storage Pool) to determine hot/cold Softek Migration Tool provides a nice Upon request, automatically moves hot suite of functions and can be combined data to SSD, cold to HDD with IBM Services Can re-monitor & rebalance any time See Total Storage Productivity Center A few key OS files can automatically SSD white paper for additional be placed on SSD insights Can specify specific data base New/enhanced tools being developed objects to be placed on SSD See white paper for additional insights Additional enhancements being developed29 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation IBM i Load Balancer Industry leading automated capability Monitors partition/ASP using “trace” IBM i intelligent hot/cold placement makes a big difference vs normal IBM User turns trace on during a peak time striping / scattering of data across all User turns trace off after reasonable drives. sample time Negligible performance impact expected This example 72 HDD + 16 SSD Tool monitors “reads” to identify hot data Looks at 1MB stripes of data Upon command, automatically moves hot Application Response time data to SSD, cold data to HDD 72 HDD + 16 SSD No Balance 72 HDD + 16 SSD Data Balanced Minimal performance impact, done in background Can remonitor and rebalance any time Probably a weekly or monthly activity Trans/min Perhaps less often if data not volatile Predicting/analyzing what % of data is hot for presale analysis to help size the number of SSD required: • Use PEX tool/output • Output from monitor (will need technical person to interpret)30 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  16. 16. IBM i SSD Balancing One of 5 ASP Balancing Types Balance data between busy units and idle units (STRASPBAL TYPE(*USAGE)) Make all of the units in the ASP have the same percent full (STRASPBAL TYPE(*CAPACITY)) Drain the data from a disk, to prepare unit it to be removed from the configuration (STRASPBAL TYPE(*MOVDTA)) (Almost obsolete) move hot data off of a compressed disk, and move cold data to the compressed disk (STRASPBAL TYPE(*HSM)) Requires specific disk controllers with compression capability – feats #2741/2748/2778. Compression only allowed in user ASPs Move cold data to HDDs and move hot data to SSDs (STRASPBAL TYPE(*HSM))31 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Using TRCASPBAL to place hot data on SSDs – IBM i HDD1 HDD2 HDD3 HDD4 SSD 100 500 100 2000 6000 10000 100 1200 6000 900 3000 10000 100 300 800 500 900 6000 900 0 4000 300 300 400 4000 300 200 600 700 1000 100 100 Trace ASP balance counts the read operations based on 1MB stripes TRCASPBAL SET(*ON) ASP(1) TIMLMT(*NOMAX) Start ASP balance moves the data STRASPBAL TYPE(*HSM) ASP(1) TIMLMT(*NOMAX) Target is 50% of read operations to be on SSD Cold data is moved (multiple threads) to HDDs, hot data is moved (single thread) to SSD32 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  17. 17. How to Find Hot Tables and Indexes - IBM i Performance Explorer BY FAR the best solution Perform analysis based on read complete and write complete events DB2 maintains statistics about the number of operations on a table or index Statistics are zeroed on each IPL Statistics only identify candidates (logical operations include both random and sequential operations) Available via: Display file description (DSPFD) Application programming interface (API) QUSRMBRD System i Navigator Health Center (V6R1 only) SQL catalog queries33 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Agenda SSD introduction/overview Implementing hot/cold Performance insights Roadmap for Power Systems SSD SSD reference material34 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  18. 18. Summary Performance Comparisons of 3 SSD Options SSD PCIe-based SAS-Bay-Based GB capacity 177 GB 69 GB 177 GB Flash Technology eMLC SLC eMLC SSD drive Base compare Similar, may be (reference a little slower in (no controller Similar point) write-heavy considerations) usage35 Power is performance redefined * Assuming same number of drives per controller/adapter ©2012 IBM Corporation Performance Comparisons of 69/177GB SSD Options SSD PCIe-based SAS-Bay-Based GB capacity 177 GB 69 GB 177 GB Flash Technology eMLC SLC eMLC SSD only performance (no Base compare controller) read heavy Similar, but can vary a little (reference point) Similar, but can vary a little workload SSD-only performance (no Typically somewhat slower Base compare controller) write heavy Similar (reference point) (0-15%) workload (due to add’l function in SSD) Controlled by Tied directly to ONE controller Controlled by #5805/5903 #5805/5903 or by #5906 with no write cache with max 4 or by #5906 adapter up to Controllers / adapters drives. RAID-5 slowed due to adapter up to 9/8 drives 9/8 drives per per controller/controller no write cache. controller/controller pair pair SSD PLUS Controller Base compare performance Typically similar * (reference point) Typically similar Read heavy workload Similar throughput, but SSD PLUS Controller potentially slower response Typically somewhat slower Base compare (0-5% mixed HDD/SSD) performance time due to no write cache * --- (reference point) -- (0-15% SSD only) Write heavy workload (due to add’l function in SSD) Bigger impact if RAID-5/6 * Assuming same number of drives per controller/adapter36 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  19. 19. Other Performance Insights – background reading • Time to Write on a HDD is the same as time to read on an HDD (1:1 ratio) • Time to Write on an SSD is much longer than a read on an SSD around (3:1 ratio) • Thus the biggest SSD performance boost is for reads compared to HDD. SSDs do reads at < 1 ms while from HDD are typically around 3-15 ms • Writes to SSD are faster than writes to HDD …. BUT …. Write cache on a SAS controller is even faster than a write to SSD. SSD can empty out the write cache faster than HDD, so SSD+write cache is generally faster than HDD+write cache, but comparisons have more “it depends” caveats • The size of information being handled makes a difference. Handling bigger blocks of data takes longer, especially if doing writes. • Randomness of information also plays a part. If there are a lot of smaller blocks of information which happen to be close together where they will be eventually be stored, then they are more likely to be in the same page of space in the SSD device’s internal controller. Thus the access and/or writes can happen “above” the real flash memory and is faster. • HDD have had ongoing cost/GB improvements over the last 5-10years, but have had little access performance enhancements. Most performance boosts have been through enhancements in controllers of HDD, not the spinning platter or arm. No significant HDD performance improvements are currently foreseen. Thus the gap between server memory and HDD will continue to widen. • If operating system can predict the data needed, it can issue a read prior to the application making the request reducing HDD delay to application. But random reads by definition are not feasible to pre-fetch. Applications with lots of random reads are thus THE ideal area for SSD benefits. • Alternatives to SSD – 1) Can “pin” information in memory. This is even faster than SSD. But SSD can provide a lot more GB of capacity and is usually more cost effective per GB. 2) Also could go buy a lot more adapters with write cache and/or spread data out, but this is less cost effective than SSD. • If an HDD fails, it can take hours to format and bring the new HDD into sync with either its mirrored pair or with the rest of the RAID-5 array. The larger the drive’s capacity, the longer the resync time can be. Until re- synced there is risk a second failure could crash the partition or application. If an SSD is replaced, the time to resync so that the RAID array or mirroring protection is restored is MUCH, MUCH faster (minutes vs hours) with SSD than HDD. • For absolute best performance use internal SSD vs SAN SSD. There in about 0.3ms (3/10ths milliseconds) additional latency in accessing SAN. For I/O intensive applications this adds up. But SANs can offer a lot of other operational and managerial advantages for many clients. The performance trade off may be a good thing to do in the overall decision. • For VERY rough rules of thumb for mixing HDD & SSD – use about 5-15% of the GB of the data – or use about 5-10% of the drives.37 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation SSD Config Options --- April 2012 Power Systems (internal / DAS) PCIe-based SAN-based SSD SAS-bay-based SSD DS8000 #5805 #5913 #ESA1/A2 #5888 Ultra #2053/54/55 SVC In CEC w/ int Gen1 PCIe Gen2 PCIe Gen2 PCIe Drawer RAID & SSD V7000 SAS contrlr 380MB 1800MB 0 MB 3100MB SAS Adapter XIV cache cache cache cache Many DAS SSD config options* for Power Clients Options vary Performance Price Physical size Where tested/supported Function * PCI-X 1.5GB SAS adapter not shown to focus on most current technologies38 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  20. 20. Power DAS SSD Options: April 2012 PCIe-based SSD SAS-bay-based SSD In CEC w/ int #5805 & #5913 & #ESA1/A2 #5888 Ultra #2053/54/55 SAS contrlr #5887*** #5887*** & #5887*** Drawer Number PCIe slots used 2 (4 mirror) 0 2 2 2 0 Number GX slots used 0 0 0 0 0 1-2 (710/730=2) Max SSD attach 4 3-8 mdl dependent 9 24 24 30 Max 177GB busy SSD W1 4 W1 2-3 W1 4-6 W1 ~24 W1 ~24 N/A reasonably supported @ W2 3-4 W2 1-2 W2 3-4 W2 ~24 W2 ~24 Max 387GB busy SSD N/A W1 1-2 W1 2-3 W1 ~20 W1 ~18 W1 ~22 reasonably supported @ W2 1 W2 1-2 W2 ~14 W2 ~14 W2 ~14 Write cache (MB) 0 175 380 1800 0 3100 GB / SSD 177 177 or 387 177 or 387 177 or 387 177 or 387 387 Servers supported - Newest 710-740 (C models) Y Y Y 710/730 limit** Y 710/730 limit** Y 720/740 limit * 710 740 - Rest POWER7 710-795 Y, except 795 Y, except 795 Y not 710/730 Y not 710/730 N N (SOD) - POWER6 Y, except 595 N Y 177GB SSD Y 177GB SSD N N AIX/IBM i/Linux support Y Y Y Y Y AIX / Linux Mix HDD & SSD N Y N Y N N (SOD) Rack space needed depends N/A 2U+ 2U+ 2U+ 1U Easy Tier N N N N N N (SOD) Approximate USA list price $3k + 2PCIe 0 $4.4k/pair + $15k/pair + $6.1k + 6.1k $24.5k + $2k with zero SSD for Mdl 740 slots $5.4k drawer $5.4k drawer + $5.4k drwr PCIe adpter PowerHA: share w/ 2 servers N N Y Y Y Y @ This is a simple rule of thumb. Actual reasonable maximum depends on many factors. Prices subject to * ESA1 not in 720/740 system unit. Can place in #5802/5877 I/O drawer attached to 720/740 change. Reseller ** Not in 710/730 system unit, but 730 (8231-E2C) can have in #5802/5877 I/O drawer prices can vary. *** Possible to use #5802 or 5803 I/O drawer instead of #5887 EXP24S Drawer. Max 177GB SSD attach would differ for #5913 and ESA1/ESA2 W1 = transaction/command/CPW type workload, smaller block, IOPS sensitive RAID5 W2 = save/restore/large-file type workload, Throughput sensitive. RAID5 Assumes #5887 is in mode2 using two SAS ports for higher bandwidth.39 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Performance: PCIe-Based vs. 69GB SAS-Bay-Based SSD Using 380MB Write Cache RAID Adapters running SAS-Bay-Based (2) #5903/5278 adapters + (8) 69GB SSD (2) #2055 + (8) 177GB SSD Running RAID-5 Running RAID-5 2 PCIe slots 4 PCIe slots Similar performance – RAID-5 to RAID-5 10 SAS-Bay- Appl Response time (ms) 1 Based PCIe-Based 0.1 0.01 SAS-bay-based 177GB SSD 0.001 0 20000 40000 60000 80000 100000 similar to 69GB Appl Trans/m in SSD Notes: • Data points measured using an artificial transaction workload which IBM believes will reasonably represent many commercial client workloads. Differences in application usage and data, for example the percentage of random reads vs percentage of writes can impact this comparison. (Your results may differ.) The above measurement used 60% reads and 40% writes. • Write cache was turned on for #5903/5278 adapters. #2055 has no write cache. .40 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  21. 21. Performance: PCIe-Based vs. 69GB SAS-Bay-Based SSD Using 380MB Write Cache RAID Adapters running SAS-Bay-Based (2) #5903/5278 adapters + (8) 69GB SSD (2) #2055 + (8) 177GB SSD Running RAID-5 Running mirroring 2 PCIe slots 4 PCIe slots Mirrored PCIe-based outperforms Medium cache RAID-5 SAS-Bay-Based 10 Appl Response time (ms) SAS-Bay- PCIe-Based 1 Based 0.1 SAS-bay-based 0.01 177GB SSD 0.001 similar to 69GB 0 50000 100000 150000 200000 SSD Application trans/min Notes: • Data points measured using an artificial transaction workload which IBM believes will reasonably represent many commercial client workloads. Differences in application usage and data, for example the percentage of random reads vs percentage of writes can impact this comparison. (Your results may vary.) The above measurement used 60% reads and 40% writes. • Write cache was turned on for #5903/5278 adapters. #2055 has no write cache. .41 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Performance: PCIe-Based vs. 69GB SAS-Bay-Based SSD Using 1500MB Write Cache RAID Adapters running SAS-Bay-Based SSD (1) #2055 + (4) 177GB SSD (1) #5904/6/8 adapters + (4) 69GB SSD Running RAID-5 Running RAID-5 2 PCIe slots 2 PCI-X slots Large cache PCI-X adapter & SSD outperforms PCIe-Based SSD ( RAID-5 to RAID-5 ) 10 PCIe-Based Appl Response time (ms) 1 0.1 SAS-bay-based 0.01 SAS-Bay- Based 177GB SSD similar to 69GB 0.001 SSD 0 20000 40000 60000 80000 Application trans/min Notes: • Data points measured using an artificial transaction workload which IBM believes will reasonably represent many commercial client workloads. Differences in application usage and data, for example the percentage of random reads vs percentage of writes can impact this comparison. (Your results may vary.) The above measurement used 60% reads and 40% writes. • Write cache was turned on for #5904/6/8 adapters. #2055 has no write cache.42 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  22. 22. Performance: HDD vs. SSD+HDD Hybrid Using 380MB Write Cache RAID Adapters running SAS-Bay-Based (2) 5903/5278 + (18) HDD (2) #5903/5278 adapters ) + (18) HDD Running mirrored + (2) #2055 + (8) 177GB SSD Running mirrored Hot data located on SSD Adding SSD and placing hot data on SSD, grew workload capability by nearly 3X Appl Response Time (ms) 10 HDD only 1 SSD+HDD hybrid 0.1 0.01 0.001 0 50000 100000 150000 200000 250000 Application Trans/min Notes: • Data points measured using an artificial transaction workload which IBM believes will reasonably represent many commercial client workloads. Differences in application usage and data, for example the percentage of random reads vs percentage of writes can impact this comparison. The above measurement used 60% reads and 40% writes. • Write cache was turned on for #5903/5278 adapters. #2055 has no write cache.43 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation SSD Analyzer Package Provides: - SSD Analysis Overview - Disk Read Time - Job & Tasks by Read Time Drilldown from here into CS & GHI perspectives Download from SSD Techdoc site: http://www-03.ibm.com/support/techdocs/atsmastr.nsf/WebIndex/PRS378044 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  23. 23. Disk Response Time Charts Detailed charts are based upon the increased detail QAPMDISKRB groups Use tooltips to fly over & get specific data45 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation CSI – SSD Candidate Screening Offered at 7.1 only, helps a user determine if SSDs could help performance. It needs data from QAPMDISKRB.46 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  24. 24. CSI – SSD Candidate Screening Offered at 7.1 only, helps a user determine if SSDs could help performance.47 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation CSI – SSD Candidate Screening job details report This is similar to the green screen SSD Analyzer tool: http://www-03.ibm.com/support/techdocs/atsmastr.nsf/WebIndex/PRS378048 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  25. 25. Agenda SSD introduction/overview Implementing hot/cold Performance insights Roadmap for Power Systems SSD SSD reference material49 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Power Systems SSD Statements of Direction Provided August 2010 IBM plans to enhance its Power Systems Enterprise Class SSD solutions with technology designed to continue to provide significant improvements in performance and storage density over time. IBM plans for these IBM Power Systems enhancements to include both SAS-bay-based and PCIe-based SSD product offerings that will leverage IBMs investments in its SSD optimized Enterprise Class RAID Storage Controllers. All statements regarding IBMs future direction & intent are subject to change or withdrawal without notice, and represents goals & objectives only. Information regarding potential future products is intended to outline our general product direction and it should not be relied on in making a purchase decision. The information mentioned regarding potential future products is not a commitment, promise, or legal obligation to deliver any material, code or functionality. Information about potential future products may not be incorporated into any contract. The development, release, and timing of any future features or functionality described for our products remains at our sole discretion.50 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  26. 26. Power Solid State Drives (SSD) Roadmap 2009 • Apr/May - Introduction SAS-bay-based • July/Oct/Nov - Misc enhancements • Nov/Dec - Huge price action – matching memory price action 2010 • Feb - support in Power 750, 755, 770, 780 • April - IBM i 7.1 enhancements • August - Support in new POWER7 servers & AIX 7.1 enhancements • August - Introduce additional SSD config option … PCIe-based 2011 • Enhancements to both SAS-bay-based and PCIe-based SSD More capacity in SSD devices More performance in SAS controllers 2012 … more enhancements See SODs made August 2010. All statements regarding IBMs future direction & intent are subject to change or withdrawal without notice, and represents goals & objectives only.51 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Roadmap: SSD Configuration 2011 Options SAS-bay-based SAS Bays PCI SAS SSD SSD SSD SSD SSD SSD SSD SSD SSD SSD controller New PCIe card Larger capacity SSD (pair for redundancy) Continue Hot plug SSD Large cache, high performance More SSD modules / controller PCIe-based Double-wide PCIe card PCIe SAS SSD (need pair for hot plug) SSD controller SSD Up to 4 SSD modules SSD See SODs made August 2010. All statements regarding IBMs future direction & intent are subject to change or withdrawal without notice, and represents goals & objectives only.52 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  27. 27. Agenda SSD introduction/overview Implementing hot/cold Performance insights Roadmap for Power Systems SSD SSD reference material53 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation SSD Analyzer Tool for IBM i • Quick, easy, no-charge analysis looks at standard performance report output • Provides “probably yes”, “probably no”, or “maybe • Provides rough estimate of quantity of SSD to recommend SSD ANALYSIS TOOL (ANZSSDDTA) Type choices, press Enter. PERFORMANCE MEMBER . . . . . . . *DEFAULT__ Name, *DEFAULT LIBRARY . . . . . . . . . . . __________ Name Additional Parameters REPORT TYPE . . . . . . . . . . *SUMMARY *DETAIL, *SUMMARY, *BOTH TIME PERIOD:: START TIME AND DATE:: BEGINNING TIME . . . . . . . . *AVAIL__ Time, *AVAIL BEGINNING DATE . . . . . . . . *BEGIN__ Date, *BEGIN END TIME AND DATE:: ENDING TIME . . . . . . . . . *AVAIL__ Time, *AVAIL ENDING DATE . . . . . . . . . *END____ Date, *END NUMBER OF RECORDS IN REPORT . . 50__ 0 - 9999 Bottom F3=Exit F4=Prompt F5=Refresh F12=Cancel F13=How to use this display F24=More keys Available via www.ibm.com/support/techdocs in “Presentations & Tools”. Search using keyword SSD54 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  28. 28. Additional Marketing Materials Brochure …. Power System SSD Web pages Positioning, educating, linking to other materials www.ibm.com/systems/power/hardware/peripherals/ssd/index.html Additional white paper information being worked on by Development – availability dates TBD List of existing SSD white papers follow on separate slides55 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation SSD Brochure Sales personnel can access brochure through SSI / PW web pages56 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  29. 29. Power Systems SSD Web Pages Several informative pages on SSD positioned from a Power Systems perspective http://www.ibm.com/ systems/power/hard ware/peripherals/ss d/index.html57 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Five Power Systems SSD White Papers IBM Power SSD vs Consumer SSD (posted Nov 2009) “Advantages of True Enterprise Solid State Drives (SSDs) in Enterprise Systems” AIX-specific (posted Apr 2009) “Driving Business Value on Power Systems with Solid State Drives” IBM i-specific (posted May 2009) “Performance Value of Solid State Drives using IBM i” First published May 2009 More SSD technology specific – AIX/IBM i/Linux appropriate (posted Jun 2009) “Performance Impacts of Flash SSDs Upon IBM Power Systems” Above papers in Power Systems web site under “Resources/Literature” http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/apilite?infotype=SA&infosubt=WH&lastdays =1825&hitlimit=200&ctvwcode=US&pubno=POW*USEN&appname=STGE_PO_ PO_USEN_WH&additional=summary&contents=keeponlit 5th paper for an SAP environment http://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/sdn/db4?rid=/library/uuid/90a1637e-065f-2c10- 3ab7-bea9375fc88d58 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  30. 30. i Oriented References/Tool IBM - Performance Management on IBM i Resource Library http://www.ibm.com/systems/i/advantages/perfmgmt/resource.html Performance Value of Solid State Drives using IBM i http://www.ibm.com/systems/resources/ssd_ibmi.pdf Performance Impacts of Flash SSDs Upon IBM Power Systems http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/cgi- bin/ssialias?infotype=SA&subtype=WH&htmlfid=POW03028USEN&attachme nt=POW03028USEN.PDF&appname=STGE_PO_PO_USEN_WH Driving Business Value on Power Systems with Solid State Drives http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/cgi- bin/ssialias?infotype=SA&subtype=WH&htmlfid=POW03025USEN&attachme nt=POW03025USEN.PDF&appname=STGE_PO_PO_USEN_WH IBM Systems Lab Services and Training http://www.ibm.com/systems/services/labservices IBM Power Systems(i) Benchmarking and Proof-of-Concept Centers http://www.ibm.com/systems/i/support/benchmarkcenters59 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Agenda SSD introduction/overview Implementing hot/cold Performance insights Roadmap for Power Systems SSD SSD reference material Questions?60 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  31. 31. IBM Tak Dank je Gracia Merci Thanks s Grazie Danke TakkPower is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation IBMPower is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  32. 32. Performance and Scalability Services The IBM i Performance and Scalability Services Center can provide facilities and hardware IN ROCHESTER to assist you in testing hardware or software changes “Traditional” benchmarks Release-to-release upgrades Assess application performance when migrating to a new release of IBM I Stress test your system Determine impact of application changes Proofs of Concept (e.g. HA alternatives; SSD analysis, external storage, etc.) Evaluate application scalability Capacity planning … all with the availability of Lab Services IBM i experts and development personnel63 To request any of these services, submit at: Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation IBM Systems Lab Services and Training Mainframe Systems Our Mission and Profile Support the IBM Systems Agenda and accelerate the adoption of new products and solutions Power Systems Maximize performance of our clients’ existing IBM systems Deliver technical training, conferences, and other services tailored to System x & Bladecenter meet client needs Team with IBM Service Providers to optimize the deployment of IBM solutions (GTS, GBS, SWG Lab Services and our IBM Business System Storage Partners) Our Competitive Advantage IT Infrastructure Optimization Leverage relationships with the IBM development labs to build deep technical skills and exploit the expertise of our developers Combined expertise of Lab Services and the Training for Systems Data Center Services team Skills can be deployed worldwide to assure all client needs can be Successful worldwide history: Training Services met 17 years in Americas, 9 years in Europe/Middle East/Africa, 5 years in Asia Pacific www.ibm.com/systems/services/labservices stgls@us.ibm.com64 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  33. 33. Special notices This document was developed for IBM offerings in the United States as of the date of publication. IBM may not make these offerings available in other countries, and the information is subject to change without notice. Consult your local IBM business contact for information on the IBM offerings available in your area. Information in this document concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of these products or other public sources. Questions on the capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products. IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. Send license inquires, in writing, to IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, New Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785 USA. All statements regarding IBM future direction and intent are subject to change or withdrawal without notice, and represent goals and objectives only. The information contained in this document has not been submitted to any formal IBM test and is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees either expressed or implied. All examples cited or described in this document are presented as illustrations of the manner in which some IBM products can be used and the results that may be achieved. Actual environmental costs and performance characteristics will vary depending on individual client configurations and conditions. IBM Global Financing offerings are provided through IBM Credit Corporation in the United States and other IBM subsidiaries and divisions worldwide to qualified commercial and government clients. Rates are based on a clients credit rating, financing terms, offering type, equipment type and options, and may vary by country. Other restrictions may apply. Rates and offerings are subject to change, extension or withdrawal without notice. IBM is not responsible for printing errors in this document that result in pricing or information inaccuracies. All prices shown are IBMs United States suggested list prices and are subject to change without notice; reseller prices may vary. IBM hardware products are manufactured from new parts, or new and serviceable used parts. Regardless, our warranty terms apply. Any performance data contained in this document was determined in a controlled environment. Actual results may vary significantly and are dependent on many factors including system hardware configuration and software design and configuration. Some measurements quoted in this document may have been made on development-level systems. There is no guarantee these measurements will be the same on generally- available systems. Some measurements quoted in this document may have been estimated through extrapolation. Users of this document should verify the applicable data for their specific environment. Revised September 26, 200665 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Special notices (cont.) IBM, the IBM logo, ibm.com AIX, AIX (logo), AIX 5L, AIX 6 (logo), AS/400, BladeCenter, Blue Gene, ClusterProven, DB2, ESCON, i5/OS, i5/OS (logo), IBM Business Partner (logo), IntelliStation, LoadLeveler, Lotus, Lotus Notes, Notes, Operating System/400, OS/400, PartnerLink, PartnerWorld, PowerPC, pSeries, Rational, RISC System/6000, RS/6000, THINK, Tivoli, Tivoli (logo), Tivoli Management Environment, WebSphere, xSeries, z/OS, zSeries, Active Memory, Balanced Warehouse, CacheFlow, Cool Blue, IBM Systems Director VMControl, pureScale, TurboCore, Chiphopper, Cloudscape, DB2 Universal Database, DS4000, DS6000, DS8000, EnergyScale, Enterprise Workload Manager, General Parallel File System, , GPFS, HACMP, HACMP/6000, HASM, IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager, iSeries, Micro-Partitioning, POWER, PowerExecutive, PowerVM, PowerVM (logo), PowerHA, Power Architecture, Power Everywhere, Power Family, POWER Hypervisor, Power Systems, Power Systems (logo), Power Systems Software, Power Systems Software (logo), POWER2, POWER3, POWER4, POWER4+, POWER5, POWER5+, POWER6, POWER6+, POWER7, System i, System p, System p5, System Storage, System z, TME 10, Workload Partitions Manager and X-Architecture are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. If these and other IBM trademarked terms are marked on their first occurrence in this information with a trademark symbol (® or ™), these symbols indicate U.S. registered or common law trademarks owned by IBM at the time this information was published. Such trademarks may also be registered or common law trademarks in other countries. A full list of U.S. trademarks owned by IBM may be found at: http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml. Adobe, the Adobe logo, PostScript, and the PostScript logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States, and/or other countries. AltiVec is a trademark of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. AMD Opteron is a trademark of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. InfiniBand, InfiniBand Trade Association and the InfiniBand design marks are trademarks and/or service marks of the InfiniBand Trade Association. Intel, Intel logo, Intel Inside, Intel Inside logo, Intel Centrino, Intel Centrino logo, Celeron, Intel Xeon, Intel SpeedStep, Itanium, and Pentium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. IT Infrastructure Library is a registered trademark of the Central Computer and Telecommunications Agency which is now part of the Office of Government Commerce. Java and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Linear Tape-Open, LTO, the LTO Logo, Ultrium, and the Ultrium logo are trademarks of HP, IBM Corp. and Quantum in the U.S. and other countries. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries or both. Microsoft, Windows and the Windows logo are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries or both. NetBench is a registered trademark of Ziff Davis Media in the United States, other countries or both. SPECint, SPECfp, SPECjbb, SPECweb, SPECjAppServer, SPEC OMP, SPECviewperf, SPECapc, SPEChpc, SPECjvm, SPECmail, SPECimap and SPECsfs are trademarks of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corp (SPEC). The Power Architecture and Power.org wordmarks and the Power and Power.org logos and related marks are trademarks and service marks licensed by Power.org. TPC-C and TPC-H are trademarks of the Transaction Performance Processing Council (TPPC). UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States, other countries or both. Other company, product and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. Revised December 2, 201066 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation
  34. 34. Notes on benchmarks and valuesThe IBM benchmarks results shown herein were derived using particular, well configured, development-level and generally-available computer systems. Buyers shouldconsult other sources of information to evaluate the performance of systems they are considering buying and should consider conducting application oriented testing. Foradditional information about the benchmarks, values and systems tested, contact your local IBM office or IBM authorized reseller or access the Web site of the benchmarkconsortium or benchmark vendor.IBM benchmark results can be found in the IBM Power Systems Performance Report at http://www.ibm.com/systems/p/hardware/system_perf.html .All performance measurements were made with AIX or AIX 5L operating systems unless otherwise indicated to have used Linux. For new and upgraded systems, the latestversions of AIX were used. All other systems used previous versions of AIX. The SPEC CPU2006, LINPACK, and Technical Computing benchmarks were compiled usingIBMs high performance C, C++, and FORTRAN compilers for AIX 5L and Linux. For new and upgraded systems, the latest versions of these compilers were used: XL Cfor AIX v11.1, XL C/C++ for AIX v11.1, XL FORTRAN for AIX v13.1, XL C/C++ for Linux v11.1, and XL FORTRAN for Linux v13.1.For a definition/explanation of each benchmark and the full list of detailed results, visit the Web site of the benchmark consortium or benchmark vendor.TPC http://www.tpc.orgSPEC http://www.spec.orgLINPACK http://www.netlib.org/benchmark/performance.pdfPro/E http://www.proe.comGPC http://www.spec.org/gpcVolanoMark http://www.volano.comSTREAM http://www.cs.virginia.edu/stream/SAP http://www.sap.com/benchmark/Oracle, Siebel, PeopleSoft http://www.oracle.com/apps_benchmark/Baan http://www.ssaglobal.comFluent http://www.fluent.com/software/fluent/index.htmTOP500 Supercomputers http://www.top500.org/Ideas International http://www.ideasinternational.com/benchmark/bench.htmlStorage Performance Council http://www.storageperformance.org/results Revised December 2, 201067 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation Notes on HPC benchmarks and values The IBM benchmarks results shown herein were derived using particular, well configured, development-level and generally-available computer systems. Buyers should consult other sources of information to evaluate the performance of systems they are considering buying and should consider conducting application oriented testing. For additional information about the benchmarks, values and systems tested, contact your local IBM office or IBM authorized reseller or access the Web site of the benchmark consortium or benchmark vendor. IBM benchmark results can be found in the IBM Power Systems Performance Report at http://www.ibm.com/systems/p/hardware/system_perf.html . All performance measurements were made with AIX or AIX 5L operating systems unless otherwise indicated to have used Linux. For new and upgraded systems, the latest versions of AIX were used. All other systems used previous versions of AIX. The SPEC CPU2006, LINPACK, and Technical Computing benchmarks were compiled using IBMs high performance C, C++, and FORTRAN compilers for AIX 5L and Linux. For new and upgraded systems, the latest versions of these compilers were used: XL C for AIX v11.1, XL C/C++ for AIX v11.1, XL FORTRAN for AIX v13.1, XL C/C++ for Linux v11.1, and XL FORTRAN for Linux v13.1. Linpack HPC (Highly Parallel Computing) used the current versions of the IBM Engineering and Scientific Subroutine Library (ESSL). For Power7 systems, IBM Engineering and Scientific Subroutine Library (ESSL) for AIX Version 5.1 and IBM Engineering and Scientific Subroutine Library (ESSL) for Linux Version 5.1 were used. For a definition/explanation of each benchmark and the full list of detailed results, visit the Web site of the benchmark consortium or benchmark vendor. SPEC http://www.spec.org LINPACK http://www.netlib.org/benchmark/performance.pdf Pro/E http://www.proe.com GPC http://www.spec.org/gpc STREAM http://www.cs.virginia.edu/stream/ Fluent http://www.fluent.com/software/fluent/index.htm TOP500 Supercomputers http://www.top500.org/ AMBER http://amber.scripps.edu/ FLUENT http://www.fluent.com/software/fluent/fl5bench/index.htm GAMESS http://www.msg.chem.iastate.edu/gamess GAUSSIAN http://www.gaussian.com ANSYS http://www.ansys.com/services/hardware-support-db.htm Click on the "Benchmarks" icon on the left hand side frame to expand. Click on "Benchmark Results in a Table" icon for benchmark results. ABAQUS http://www.simulia.com/support/v68/v68_performance.php ECLIPSE http://www.sis.slb.com/content/software/simulation/index.asp?seg=geoquest& MM5 http://www.mmm.ucar.edu/mm5/ MSC.NASTRAN http://www.mscsoftware.com/support/prod%5Fsupport/nastran/performance/v04_sngl.cfm STAR-CD www.cd-adapco.com/products/STAR-CD/performance/320/index/html NAMD http://www.ks.uiuc.edu/Research/namd Revised December 2, 2010 HMMER http://hmmer.janelia.org/ http://powerdev.osuosl.org/project/hmmerAltivecGen2mod68 Power is performance redefined ©2012 IBM Corporation

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