Music theory

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This is a example powerpoint slide of what you might see in a 12th grade music theory class. This is an outline/introduction to root position part writing!

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Music theory

  1. 1. Music Theory<br />12th grade <br />Root Position Part Writing<br />Caitie Wagner<br />
  2. 2. <ul><li>Vocabulary
  3. 3. Guidelines
  4. 4. Parallel Motion
  5. 5. Errors in Writing
  6. 6. Example
  7. 7. Practice</li></ul>Table of Contents<br />
  8. 8. <ul><li>Root – First note of the chord (gives chord its name)
  9. 9. Common Tone – note in the voice that stays the same despite change of chords
  10. 10. Voice leading –ways in which chords are produced by the motions of individual musical lines
  11. 11. Focal Point – Highest sounding note in a melody
  12. 12. Contour – Shape of the melody
  13. 13. Counterpoint – combining of relatively independent musical lines</li></ul>Vocabulary<br />
  14. 14. General Guidelines<br /><ul><li>Keep the rhythm simple
  15. 15. Every melody note should belong to the chord that is to harmonize it
  16. 16. Keep the melody mostly stepwise. The shape of the melody should be clear and simple but interesting with a single focal point
  17. 17. Leaps</li></ul>1. Avoid augmented intervals, 7ths, and anything larger than an octave<br /> 2. Melodic interval larger than a P4 should be followed by a step opposite to the leap <br /> 3. When smaller leaps are used in the same direction, they should outline a triad<br /><ul><li>Tendency Tones </li></ul>1. 7 has a tendency to go to 1 (unless it’s a descending scale)<br />2. 4 usually moves to 3, but not as big of a deal if it doesn’t<br />
  18. 18. Sometimes in music voices that move from one chord to another they form relationships to each other. There are five possibilities:<br />STATIC OBLIQUE CONTRARY<br />Stays the same <br />SIMILAR PARALLEL<br />Parallel motion<br />Why is this one so special?? Let’s find out…<br />
  19. 19. Now that you have some guidelines in place…let’s learn some rules!<br />PARALLEL FIFTHS AND OCTAVES<br /><ul><li>These are bad!!! When two parts move in parallel motion by fifths or octaves, yer asking for trouble mister!! It interferes with the independence of the line and makes them too uniform</li></ul>DIRECT (OR HIDDEN) FIFTHS AND OCTAVES<br /><ul><li>When the soprano and bass move in similar motion into a P5 or P8 and the soprano makes a leap (aurally it’s similar to a parallel fifth or octave, that’s why it’s bad!)</li></ul>Errors to Avoid<br />
  20. 20. Now that you have the rules…<br />let’s put it to practice!!<br />
  21. 21. LEAD BY EXAMPLE!<br />PAY ATTENTION TO KEY SIGNATURE – CHECK IF ITS MAJOR OR MINOR<br />SIMILAR<br />STATIC MOTION<br />OBLIQUE<br />PARALLEL<br />
  22. 22. Analyze this piece by…<br />pRACTICE<br />Labeling the chords with figure bass<br />Identify different kinds of parallel motion<br />If there is any, label parallel/hidden 5ths and octaves<br />
  23. 23. Listen to the clip provided and do the following:<br />Write what things you like and dislike about the piece.<br />Research the time period the piece was written in (I’ll give you a hint…it’s Beethoven!!!) and describe what was typical musically during that time period.<br />Watch the contours of the lines – do you think the piece was shaped well?<br />See you in class next time!<br />Homework<br />

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