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Conditions of enslavement
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Conditions of enslavement

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  • 1. No slave family was the same. Somewere treated more kindly, but most weretreated cruelly. These slaves tried many things, from resistance, escaping, and adapting, to deal with slavery.
  • 2.  Huge amounts of  White males often manual labor sexually abused slave detrimental to their women. health.  Families often Banned from education separated Viewed as property  Slaves who tried to Physically abused escape would be (whipped, lashed) for punished with mutilation minor things. or death. 50,000 attempted to escape, few successfully did.
  • 3.  Many slaves just had to make the best of their horrible life. Most were devout Christians and sang slave songs to cope. Their responsorial style of preaching – when people responded to the minister’s sermon with accents and amens – was an adaptation of the style in the African ringshout dance. Funerals and weddings were important to bond the slave community.
  • 4.  Most slavery rebellions were swiftly squashed, such as Nat Turner’s Rebellion, where black preacher Nat Turner led an uprising that killed 60 Virginians. Most resisted by running away. One of the few successful rebellions was when enslaved Africans overthrew the Spanish slave ship Amistad in 1839. They tried to sail back to Africa but ended up on Long Island and were imprisoned. John Quincy Adams fought for their release, and they were released back to Africa.
  • 5.  Slaves who tried to escape were assisted by Northern abolitionists in a system called the Underground Railroad.  Because of the fugitive slave laws, Northerners who hid slaves were in risk of imprisonment.  One escaped slave, Harriet Tubman, helpedThis document is a Southern over 400 slaves escape toadvertisement for an escaped the North.slave. The poster promises a$150 reward for his return.

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