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Gatwick 2013 cip-published_july_2013 (1)

  1. 1. 2013 GATWICK CAPITAL INVESTMENT PROGRAMME Published following airline consultation in April 2013 – June 2013 Figures correct as at 31.03.2013
  2. 2. Images on front cover: 1. Emirates A380 at Gatwick 2. Gatwick Main Runway Resurfacing project 3. South Terminal International Departure lounge (ST IDL) Phase 1 Project
  3. 3. contents Section Subject Page Foreword by Stewart Wingate 1 Introduction 3 CHAPTER 1 Updated Traffic forecasts and Airport Master Plan 5 CHAPTER 2 Our Strategic Ambition: to become London’s airport of choice 15 CHAPTER 3 Consultation on the Capital Investment Programme 25 CHAPTER 4 Project Descriptions 35 APPENDICES APPENDIX A Phased Capital Investment Programme 2013 93 APPENDIX B Phased Capital Investment Programme 2012 94 APPENDIX C Changes to Investment Programme - Tracker for the period April 2012 to March 2013 95 APPENDIX D Previous Traffic Forecasts as published in the 2012 CIP 96 APPENDIX E Meetings, Working Groups and Governance Boards 97 APPENDIX F Decision Log 103 APPENDIX G Annex G 108 APPENDIX H Gatwick’s updated Product Matrix 113 GLOSSARY 117
  4. 4. 1FOREWORD BY STEWART WINGATE Since the last issue of the annual capital investment programme (CIP), we have published our ten year Business Plan for the period April 2014 up to March 2024. In the revised Business Plan, which is with the CAA for consideration, we’ve set out our vision for London Gatwick which builds on the great progress we’ve made in the last three years. We’re clearly now competing with the other London airports, and continue to build a world class experience for our passengers. In respect to the current CIP I am pleased to report that as at 31st March 2013 a further 19 % of the capital investment has been delivered since April 2012, and we now have 82 % of our £1.172 billion CIP either completed or under construction. During 2012, our efforts at helping our airlines partners grow at Gatwick and transforming the passengers’ experience were recognised at several industry awards in 2012, including the much coveted Best UK airport at the 2012 British Travel Awards. Since April 2012, easyJet has introduced seven new routes and also confirmed it will launch a new twice- daily service from Gatwick to Moscow Domodedovo airport from spring 2013. Norwegian Air Shuttle, one of Europe’s fastest-growing airlines, announced it is to establish a new base in London at Gatwick Airport in spring 2013. BA introduced a three-weekly service to Las Vegas and Colombo and Thomson announced a weekly service to Phuket from October 2013. New carriers to the airport during this period included Air Arabia and Gambia Bird, with Garuda Indonesia announcing their intention to commence services from Gatwick in the autumn. Clearly the growth of these routes demonstrates confidence from our airline partners in the facilities provided and shows airlines wanting to operate flights to London are actually choosing Gatwick over other London airports. We delivered on several important projects during the year to support our current and future growth. The rehabilitation of Gatwick’s most critical asset, the Main runway, was substantially completed in December 2012 following a challenging period of delivery during a record breaking summer for rainfall. The impacts were managed through working collaboratively with the airlines to ensure completion of the most critical works prior to October. In the South Terminal (ST), the ST International Departure Lounge (IDL) Phase 1 Project (WDF) was opened in July 2012, providing a brand new ST walk through duty free facility, Europe’s largest World Duty Free store. Big improvements were brought to the passenger experience in the North Terminal (NT) with the opening of Jamie’s Italian and the Yo! Sushi restaurants in June 2012. The opening of Jamie’s Italian is a great example of how Gatwick is competing to become London’s airport of choice with Gatwick being recognised as having delivered the best travel restaurant throughout the travel industry in 2012.
  5. 5. 2 The Pier 5 project, which aims to deliver improved pier service levels to meet future growth in passenger numbers in North Terminal, is currently well underway with the completion of phase 1 anticipated in July 2013. In November 2012, Gatwick awarded its largest construction contract to date to demolish Pier 1 and construct a new building in the South Terminal to house both a new baggage system and a new pier. At a total cost of £178.9 million, this project is Gatwick’s largest capital investment since the change of ownership three years ago. It is also a historic milestone for Gatwick as Pier 1 is one of the oldest assets in South Terminal, first opened in 1958. Phase 1 of the South Terminal Baggage and Pier 1 project comprising the replacement of the HBS facility was completed in September 2012. Phase 2 comprising the construction of a new ST baggage factory and brand new pier with 5 fully serviced stands, entailing the demolition of the existing Pier 1 and delivery of an automated baggage storage facility, will open in 2015. The A380 on Stand project came into service in March 2013 under budget, with the first A380 service utilising stand 110 on 26th March. There have also been major upgrades to the baggage system to increase capacity and improve efficiency with the NT Baggage upgrade project completing in December 2012. As we continue to deliver our compelling vision and raise the profile of Gatwick as a major London airport it is imperative that an in-depth understanding of the needs of our passengers and business partners continues to drive our capital investment decisions. We have already undertaken further passenger survey work during 2012, validating previous studies and seeking new dimensions to the data. We also regularly meet with our airline community, individually and multilaterally, seeking to understand the needs and alignment of our stakeholders. 2013 will be a critical year. The sale of Stansted signals the first time that all London airports are under separate ownership, driving real competition. It is also the year that the CAA, will make decisions about which airports should be regulated. 2013 has also seen the start of a process that could lead to new runway development in the South East, Gatwick has now formally notified the Airports Commission that it will be developing options for expansion of the airport, these options could mean a second runway at Gatwick, but not until the mid-2020s at the earliest. As we deliver the final 18 % of our £1.172 billion investment in 2013/2014, we’ll continue working together with our airline partners positioning Gatwick as ‘London’s airport of choice’. Yours faithfully Stewart Wingate Chief Executive
  6. 6. 3 The 2013 Capital Investment Programme (CIP) is an annual document around which consultation between airlines and Gatwick Airport Ltd (GAL) takes place, in line with Annex G’s requirements. It forms part of our consultation with our airline partners about the future of Gatwick until 2024. The 2013 CIP outlines in detail Gatwick’s performance in the first five years of the fifth quinquennium, commonly referred to as ‘Q5’. Q5 commenced on 1st April 2008 and was due to end in March 2013. In March 2011, the CAA published its decision to extend the current Q5 price control period by one year to 31 March 2014, therefore the projects expected to be completed within this time frame are also included. For the purposes of this document, the Q5 price control period and the extension year 2013/2014 will henceforth be referred to as ‘Q5’. This CIP also includes a summary sheet of the proposed projects for the period beyond Q5, i.e. for the next 10 years starting April 2014 to March 2024. As stated previously this proposal is subject to the CAA’s consideration, their initial view will be known at the end of April 2013. The CIP in Context As one of the three regulated airports in the UK, Gatwick is subject to regulatory review by the CAA and the Competition Commission every five years. Accordingly Annex G requires GAL to produce information within annual capital planning documents covering at least 10 years, around which consultation takes place. It states that the purpose of the CIP document is to allow the airport to consult on a number of matters relating to Q5 (and future price control periods) Under Annex G, the key aspects to the airport - airline consultation on airport development plans consist of the following main documents: • Gatwick Airport Master Plan • Gatwick Capital Investment Programme (CIP) • Consultation on individual projects. Together the Master Plan and CIP documents provide a clear picture of Gatwick’s roadmap of development within the current, medium and long term view. The final Gatwick Master Plan, identifying the high-level strategic development direction for Gatwick comprising current and future land use plans and taking account of the responses from the consultation process was published in July 2012. The Gatwick Capital Investment Programme (CIP) includes a detailed description of individual projects designed to address these development requirements and reports on consultation with the airlines. Assumptions for the CIP Although Gatwick has announced it will be developing options for expansion of the airport for submission to the Airports Commission, this CIP report is based on the assumption that Gatwick will remain a single runway airport up to the mid-2020s. This single runway-two terminal scenario is the key premise upon which the ten year airport investment programme is based. Gatwick continues to safeguard for a second runway. There is still room to grow in the short to medium term, by using un-utilised runway capacity during off-peak periods. By making full use of the potential of the single runway we believe Gatwick can build capacity to accommodate up to 39.2 million passengers (high case scenario) by 2018/2019, as outlined in Chapter 1 - Traffic Forecasts. INTRODUCTION
  7. 7. 4 The Structure of the CIP The content of the CIP is guided by the CAA’s Annex G requirements for the Capital Investment Programme and is intended to describe the capital investment for Gatwick over an extended Q5. It aims to provide details regarding the drivers and priorities for investment as well as giving specific information on current and future projects. The structure of this document is as follows: • Chapter 1 describes Gatwick’s existing traffic and provides details of our latest traffic forecasts. It articulates how these forecasts are translated into facility requirements. • Chapter 2 describes the Gatwick Investment Strategy, setting out the principal drivers and priorities for investment at the airport. It also includes a more detailed look at some of the investment initiatives at Gatwick that have already been delivered, are currently being delivered and will be delivered at Gatwick in the future. We have also included a high level overview of the ‘Beyond Q5’ Capital plan as set out in Gatwick’s Business Plan. • Chapter 3 provides an update on the consultative process undertaken at Gatwick and an overview of how we comply with the requirements of Annex G - outlining how we engage with all our customers and stakeholders comprising airlines, passengers and the wider Gatwick community. It highlights key elements of this consultation. • Chapter 4 contains individual project descriptions, including details on costs, for all projects or programmes over £5 million (out-turn prices). Appendices are included showing the 2013 CIP forecast phasing of expenditure of all major projects and programmes of greater value than £1 million (Appendix A), the CIP 2012 forecast phasing of expenditure of all major projects and programmes of greater value than £1 million (Appendix B) and a tracker that highlights changes to the 2012 CIP report (Appendix C). The previous 2012 CIP report highlighted the changes brought to capital investment programmes at Gatwick since 2008 up to March 2012. Please refer to Appendix D in the previous 2012 CIP publication (pages 97 - 99). Also included in the appendices are the previously published traffic forecasts (Appendix D) and a log of all the consultation fora and working groups since the publication of the previous CIP, highlighting subjects discussed and decisions made (Appendix E & F). A copy of Annex G is included for reference (Appendix G). A copy of the indicative 2020 Gatwick Airport Layout plan, extracted from the published final Master Plan, was provided in the 2012 CIP publication. (Refer to Appendix H, page 119 in the 2012 CIP). A copy of the updated GAL Product Matrix is included in Appendix H. In line with Annex G this CIP document should be regarded as a product of consultation at the time of publication and also as a basis for future consultation and thus, does not represent a mandatory investment programme. Feedback This document was originally circulated amongst the JSG ACC members at Gatwick as a draft publication for consultation in April 2013, with a request for feedback. The period for formal feedback has since expired and this is the final version of the 2013 Gatwick CIP. We do of course value feedback throughout the year. The feedback will help us improve Gatwick’s future Capital plans. If you have any queries on this document, or would like to comment, please email Neermala Khoobarry: neermala.khoobarry@gatwickairport.com.
  8. 8. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 5CHAPTER 1 1.1 Updated Traffic Forecasts Introduction As reported in previous CIP publications, we have commissioned ICF SH&E, a leading aviation consultancy to produce an independent view of the future demand for Gatwick. To align with the latest economic outlook, the forecasts were updated in September 2012. These latest forecasts are outlined in the following sections and were included in the revised GAL business plan. Overview of 2012/13 Gatwick is the UK’s second busiest airport. It is a vital part of the UK’s transport infrastructure offering more travel destinations than any other London airport. Gatwick’s operations are very much aligned to the needs of those travelling to and from London and the South East. In 2012/13, Gatwick handled 34.2 million passengers; 1.2% more than in 2011/12 (33.8m). It is however 3.7% (1.3m passengers) below 2007/08 when 35.6m passengers were processed at Gatwick. Growth was achieved through: • Incumbent airlines such as easyJet, British Airways and Norwegian Air Shuttle growing frequencies on existing routes and with higher load factors • New airlines operating out of Gatwick including Air China, Air Arabia Maroc, Iraqi Airways, Icelandair, WOW Air, Caribbean Airlines, Vueling and Gambia Bird all commenced operations at London Gatwick • New routes being opened, including easyJet flying to Moscow, Norwegian Air Shuttle opening the first of 12 new routes, and British Airways increasing its services in Europe and the Caribbean Conversely and reflecting the real competition in the market, some airlines reduced services or ceased to operate at Gatwick. Ryanair withdrew all non-Irish routes, Korean Air consolidated winter services at Heathrow after renewed competition from BA, Adria Airways relocated to Luton and more recently, Air Moldova moved operations to Stansted. Gatwick saw passenger load factors go up 1.4% points in 2012/13 (82.6%) compared to 2011/12 (81.2%). Capacity improved 1.1% as seats per movement increased from 172 in 2011/12 to 174 in 2012/13. One of Gatwick’s strengths is its range of airline services and routes. Typically in 2012/13, Gatwick was served by 60 regularly operating passenger airlines, comprising a mix of full service, low cost, and charter airlines. On average, passenger airlines operated 653 daily flights. Gatwick’s two largest carriers account for over half the passenger traffic at Gatwick. easyJet is the largest, accounting for 40% of passenger traffic, while British Airways accounts for 15%. In 2012/13, airlines operating at Gatwick flew at least one flight a week to over 200 destinations. In 2012/13, 88.8% of passengers travelled on international services and 11.2% on domestic. The majority of passengers were on short-haul routes to destinations in the UK and Europe, though a number of long-haul destinations such as Orlando, Dubai, Sharm El Sheikh, Bridgetown and Cancun are among Gatwick’s busiest services. The variety of aircraft types operating at Gatwick reflects a diverse mix of airlines and routes. Narrow-body jet aircraft such as the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 are the most common type, reflecting the dominance of short-haul operations. These account for 77.1% of total passenger operations. Wide-body jet aircraft such as the B777 and B747 account for 8.1% of passenger operations and are typically deployed on long-haul routes to North America, the Caribbean, the Middle East and Far East.
  9. 9. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 6 Regional jets and turboprop aircraft account for approximately 10.6% of passenger operations. Flybe is the main regional jet and turboprop operator, operating many of the domestic routes from Gatwick. Marginal growth is forecast in 2013/14 as there are a number of airlines and routes that will no longer operate in the coming financial year. The constrained economic climate has also been taken into consideration. Key Drivers for Demand The demand for air travel is considered a derived demand, in that it is not demanded for its own sake, but rather to facilitate the movement of goods and people for business or leisure purposes. As such, the main drivers of demand for air travel are the growth in economic activity, international trade, inbound and outbound tourism, the relative cost of air travel compared to other modes and other factors such as tastes and fashions, taxation and environmental legislation. Economic activity shows strong historical correlation with air travel across many markets and GDP has been used by ICF SH&E as one of the key drivers of long term growth in these forecasts. It captures many of the key trends driving demand, including Business confidence, Population growth, Leisure spending and Market maturity. The current economic outlook for the UK continues to be weak and rather uncertain, although most independent commentators expect eventual recovery to positive growth following the recent widespread recession. In these long term forecasts, a balanced view has been taken, which reflects recovery in the near term being modest but positive growth over the long run. The economic headwinds buffeting aviation in the UK, such as fuel prices, APD, environmental legislation, dampened disposable incomes amongst others are reflected in the low elasticity of demand assumed for the London market as a whole, considerably below the levels experienced historically. External Negative Shocks In the UK, there has historically been a strong and consistent relationship between GDP and Air Travel, consistent with the basic premise that as incomes and economic activity increase, business and leisure demand also increase. This relationship has generally held during downturns also. For example, when there has been a recession, and economic growth has turned negative, demand for UK air travel has fallen also. At an individual airport level, traffic growth tends to show greater variability, due to other market-specific shocks such as the arrival or departure of a new airline, or based on local disruption weather, construction or political unrest. Gatwick’s traffic has experienced shocks over time, due to a combination of both broader national and international shocks such as war, oil price hikes and recessions, as well as more local shocks such as weather disruption or the arrival or departure of based airlines. Assumptions - general The three traffic scenarios produced in these forecasts are intended to provide a likely range of growth profiles for Gatwick over the forecast horizon. A set of optimistic and pessimistic assumptions have been analysed and a set of scenarios created, which provide a reasonable boundary for upside and downside risk. Over the very long term, the three cases converge towards the assumed runway capacity of Gatwick, beyond which they all grow very modestly.
  10. 10. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 7 Low Case Scenario The low case reflects the downside risk in the forecasts, with a more pessimistic set of assumptions in both the short and the long term. Possible scenarios include: • Even lower economic growth, for a prolonged period • Fuel price hike, leading to higher fares • Loss of recently gained long haul services, and/or established carriers due to competition Base Case Scenario In the first three years, growth is driven by known and expected capacity additions by existing and new carriers. The base case takes a balanced view of both positive and negative factors. Over the long term, a GDP elasticity of around unity is assumed in the base case, reflecting an on-going link to economic growth, but also increasing market maturity and a combination of negative influences on demand, such as increasing air travel costs relative to other modes. High Case Scenario The high case is intended to reflect a reasonable optimistic scenario, illustrating a set of positive conditions but remaining within previously sustained growth rates seen at Gatwick. Possible scenarios include: • Faster economic recovery and higher sustained growth rates • Greater success in capturing market share from other London airports The High case is considered appropriate for the purposes of capacity planning, as it provides an indication of the maximum likely traffic volume at Gatwick over the planning horizon. As with all forecasts, actual events may, and probably will, differ from those assumed previously. Comparison between 2012 Forecast used in Gatwick Airport Limited’s (GAL) initial business plan, published April 2012 and the September 2012 updated Forecasts The tables below show the passenger and air traffic movement forecasts prepared in February 2012 by ICF SH&E and the subsequent re-forecast exercise by ICF SH&E in September 2012. The updated September 2012 forecast has been adopted by Gatwick for the three scenarios, Base, High and Low.
  11. 11. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 8 February 2012 September 2012 Low Base High Low Base High Q5 2008/09 actual 33.1 33.1 33.1 33.1 33.1 33.1 2009/10 actual 32.4 32.4 32.4 32.4 32.4 32.4 2010/11 actual 31.6 31.6 31.6 31.6 31.6 31.6 2011/12 actual 32.5 33.3 33.9 33.8 33.8 33.8 2012/13 33.8 34.6 35.2 33.4 33.8 33.9 2013/14 33.9 35.2 36.7 32.8 34.0 34.7 Beyond Q5 2014/15 34.2 35.7 37.8 33.0 34.5 35.8 2015/16 34.3 36.0 38.8 32.8 34.7 36.6 2016/17 34.6 36.4 39.7 32.7 35.0 37.4 2017/18 34.8 36.8 40.4 32.8 35.4 38.2 2018/19 35.1 37.3 41.1 32.9 35.9 39.2 February 2012 Passenger ATMs Base Case Q5 Low Base High CATM* Non-ATM** 2008/09 actual - - - - - 2009/10 actual 244.4 244.4 244.4 0.06 6.8 2010/11 actual 235.6 235.6 235.6 0.16 6.8 2011/12 actual 242.1 242.1 242.1 0.35 6.2 2012/13 237.7 238.9 239.0 0.35 6.2 2013/14 232.6 239.5 243.5 0.35 6.2 Beyond Q5 2014/15 233.6 242.8 250.2 0.35 6.2 2015/16 231.0 243.8 254.2 0.35 6.2 2016/17 229.5 244.8 259.2 0.36 6.1 2017/18 228.7 246.4 264.4 0.36 6.1 2018/19 228.9 248.8 270.7 0.36 6.0 Growth Rate p.a.(2014/15 - 2018/19) -0.2% -0.6% 0.3% - - Growth Rate p.a.(2014/15 - 2018/19) -0.5% 0.6% 2.0% - - * CATM: Cargo Air Transport Movements i.e. Commercial Cargo flights **Non-ATM: Non Air Traffic Movements i.e. General Aviation, Air Taxi As the overall economic outlook continues to deteriorate, GAL is undertaking a further refresh of the forecasts which are anticipated to be available for the Business Plan update due July 2013. The fortunes of the Eurozone will be critical and the recent sale of Stansted Airport by BAA to the Manchester Airport Group (MAG) will intensify the competition with Gatwick for airlines and passengers. These current uncertainties make traffic forecasting particularly challenging at this time.
  12. 12. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 9 USING GATWICK TRAFFIC FORECASTS TO DETERMINE FACILITY REQUIREMENTS The driver for infrastructure capacity is peak demand. The need for infrastructure to satisfy the peak demand remains, regardless of annual passenger numbers as some slots will always be more commercially viable as certain times of the day are more attractive to passengers. It is for this reason that the busy day schedule and medium term forecasts are used to model facility requirements looking forward ten years. The previous 2012 CIP included a detailed explanation of how GAL approaches the generation of a busy day schedule and then how that it is converted in order to understand the demand for facilities. GATWICK TERMINAL FACILITIES - CURRENT AND FORECAST The tables that follow show the future forecast terminal facility requirements at Gatwick until 2020/21 in North Terminal, South Terminal and the Airfield, using the busy day schedules to assess demand. The service level assumptions that have been used in these assessments are quoted in the tables that follow.
  13. 13. Gatwick NT Facilities: Existing and Forecast to 2020/2021 with RAG Status including Q5 & Q5+1 Development Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D F G H Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 C D G H Appendix E EASYJETSPLITBETWEENTERMINALS&EZYCONSOLIDATEDINNORTHTERMINAL;HIGHCASEANDBASECASE Currentprovision ServiceStandardsassumed inassessments Summer2012,basedonactualschedule SH&EHIGHCASE2016/17(37.5mppa) FacilitiesrequiredbySummer2016 SH&EHIGHCASE2020/21(41mppa) FacilitiesrequiredbySummer2020 Airline/Terminal Assumptions EZYsplitbetweenNT&ST NoTop10carriermoves EZYsplitbetweenNT&ST NoTop10carriermoves EZYsplitbetweenNT&ST EZYbalanceshifttoSTwithPier1reopen NoTop10carriermoves ANNUALPAX ST:~16.9mppa NT:~17.2mppa ST:~18.8mppa NT:~18.8mppa ST:~20.5mppa NT:~20.5mppa TOTALBUSYDAY MOVEMENTS 868 (AugustFridayschedule,snapshopatFeb12) 888943 MAXIMUMHOURLY MOVEMENTS 535355 NORTHTERMINAL BUSYHOURDEPARTURES RUNWAYFLOW 3100(rollinghour)3730(rollinghour)[rollingevery30mins]3760(rollinghour)[rollingevery30mins] INTERNATIONALARRIVALS BUSYHOURRUNWAY FLOW 2250(rollinghour)2400(rollinghour)[rollingevery30mins]2750(rollinghour)[rollingevery30mins] DOMESTICARRIVALSBUSY HOURRUNWAYFLOW 550(rollinghour)540(rollinghour)[rollingevery30mins]540(rollinghour)[rollingevery30mins] CHECK-IN DeskProvision:159 KioskProvision:38 BusyHourFlow:~3150 @0500 BusyHourFlow:~3350 @0500 BusyHourFlow:~3600 @0500 Economy:maximumqueue timeof10minutesintotal onthebusyday(5minutes eachforkiosksandbag drop). CIP:maximumqueuetime of3minutesintotalat traditionaldesks Assuming2011CheckIntypesplits&check-in opensat-4hforLHand-2.5hforSH,Traditional DeskandBagDrop@90%Utilisation,and10% ServiceDeskUplift TotalTraditionalDeskDemand:100 TotalBagDropDemand:21 ComibinedTraditionalDesk&BagDrop Demand:121 KioskDemand@100%Utilisation:15-35 Assuminganytimecheck-in,TraditionalDesk andBagDrop@90%Utilisation,and10% ServiceDeskUplift TotalTraditionalDeskDemand:63 TotalBagDropDemand:36 ComibinedTraditionalDesk&BagDrop Demand:99 KioskDemand@100%Utilisation:18-69 Assuminganytimecheck-in,Traditional DeskandBagDrop@90%Utilisation, and10%ServiceDeskUplift TotalTraditionalDeskDemand:50 TotalBagDropDemand:50 ComibinedTraditionalDesk&BagDrop Demand:100 KioskDemand@100%Utilisation: 18-79 BAGGAGESYSTEM- CHUTES/MUPs MBHProvision:54MUPs TBFProvision:94MUPsAssumptionsappliedto figuresfrom2016:once EBSopenspassengerscan checkinbagsonarrivalat airport. Short-haulchutesopen90 minutesbeforeSTD,long- haul180minutes.Chutes close30minutesbefore STD,with15minutebuffer forsuccessiveflights. 100%LFsand20% contingencyuplift. AssumeSHchutesopenatSTD-150mins,LH atST-240mins.Somechuteschangebetween handlersduringtheday.Chutesclose30 minutesbeforeSTD,with15minutebufferfor successiveflights. Assumption:SwissportexcludingBAinMBH, othersinTBF MBHRequirement:MUPs38 TBFRequirement:MUPs86 Assumption:SwissportexcludingBAinMBH, othersinTBF SHchuteopeningatSTD-150,LHatSTD-240, closeatSTD-30with15minbuffer: MBHRequirement:MUPs34 TBFRequirement:MUPs98 AfterEBSchuteopeningatSHSTD-90,LH STD-180: MBHRequirement:MUPs22 TBFRequirement:MUPs70 AfterEBSchuteopeningatSHSTD-90, LHSTD-180: Assumption:SwissportexcludingBAin MBH,othersinTBF MBHRequirement:MUPs31 TBFRequirement:MUPs76 Assumption:BAinMBH,othersinTBF MBHRequirement:MUPs44 TBFRequirement:MUPs73 BAGGAGESYSTEM- EARLYBAGSTORE EarlyBagStore:MBH0, TBF0 Requirement:Sparechutestostoreearlybags atpeak,toenablesomecarrierstocontinue anytimecheck-in. Assumption:SwissportexcludingBAinMBH, othersinTBF MBH:430bags=11MUPsat40bags/MUP TBF:250bags=7MUPsat40bags/MUP Assumption:SwissportexcludingBAinMBH, othersinTBF AfterEBSopeningandSHchuteopeningSTD- 90,LHSTD-180: MBHRequirement:EBS1,270 TBFRequirement:EBS1,330 [SingleEBS2,260] AfterEBSopeningandSHchute openingSTD-90,LHSTD-180: Assumption:SwissportexcludingBAin MBH,othersinTBF MBHRequirement:EBS1,260 TBFRequirement:EBS1,420 Assumption:BAinMBH,othersinTBF MBHRequirement:EBS860 TBFRequirement:EBS1,860 [SingleEBS2,380] CENTRALSEARCHW20lanes Economy:busyhour passengersdonotqueue forlongerthan5minutes onthebusyday CIP:busyhourpassengers donotqueueforlonger than1minuteonthebusy day 18lanes@200pphthroughputs19lanes@200pphthroughputs.21lanes@200pphthroughputs IDLTOTALAREA IDLtotalspace:~14,150m2 (Dec12audit)0.45-0.50seatsperpeak occupancypax; 1.3m2 perseat; Retail/catering-basedon GALcommercialstandards: 1.3m2 forallIDLpax,40%in catering; 3.0m2 forallIDLpax,35% inretail; Circulationspace:20%-30% oftotalIDLspace Assumingcheck-inopensat-4hforLHand -2.5hforSH:BusyDayPeakOccupancy:~2600 TotalIDLspacerecommended:atleast 16,100m2 (excludingtoilets,speciallounges, retailstorageetc). Assuminganytimecheck-in:BusyDayPeak Occupancy:~2990 TotalIDLspacerecommended:atleast 18,500m2 (excludingtoilets,speciallounges, retailstorageetc). Assuminganytimecheck-in:BusyDay PeakOccupancy:~3400 TotalIDLspacerecommended:atleast 20,800m2 (excludingtoilets,special lounges,retailstorageetc). IDLSEATING,RETAIL& CATERING Seatingprovision:1200 (including44PRMseats) Cateringareaprovision: 3000m2 (includingkitchen andothernon-passenger areas),with1577seats Retailareaprovision: 4720m2 . Indicativeseatrequirement1170-1300,to meettargetQSMscore,butthisisa‘soft’ constraint. Cateringarearequirement:upto3,400m2 Retailarearequirement:upto7,800m2 . Indicativeseatrequirement1350-1500,to meettargetQSMscore,butthisisa‘soft’ constraint. Cateringarearequirement:upto3,900m2 Retailarearequirement:upto8,900m2 . NBRetailareaprovisiontoreduceafter2014 withexpansionto20securitysmartlanes Indicativeseatrequirement1530-1700, tomeettargetQSMscore,butthisisa ‘soft’constraint. Cateringarearequirement:upto 4,400m2 Retailarearequirement:upto10,200m2 . NBRetailareaprovisiontoreduceafter 2014withexpansionto20security smartlanes FLIGHTCONNECTIONS Currentcapacity2lanes; canexpandto3lanes Busyhourpassengersdo notqueueforlongerthan5 minutesonthebusyday 2lanes@200pphthroughputs (formostoftheday1laneissufficient) 2lanes@200pphthroughputs2lanes@200pphthroughputs IMMIGRATIONINFLOW BusyhourEUpassengers donotqueueforlonger than10minutes; Busyhournon-EU passengersdonotqueue forlongerthan20minutes. BusyHourFlow:~2200 @1900 BusyHourFlow:~2450 @1200 BusyHourFlow:~3000 @0700 IMMIGRATIONDESKS Traditionaldeskprovision: 17 EUE-gateprovision:5 Rangeofdeskrequirements dependingonproactiveor reactivedeskopening. Traditionaldeskrequirement:24-32 EUE-gaterequirement:9-11 Figuresassumenoimprovementintransaction times,from2011survey:EUTrad21sec,EU E-gate35sec, NEU110sec(easy)/300sec(hard) EUE-gaterejectrateof20%withrejecttimeof 10secbeforepaxusesEUTraddesk Estmax.Fridayqueuetimesofnobuildare20 mins(EU)and45mins(non-EU) Traditionaldeskrequirement:22-27 EUE-gaterequirement:12-13 Figuresassumenoimprovementintransaction times,from2011survey:EUTrad21sec,EU E-gate35sec, NEU110sec(easy)/300sec(hard) EUE-gaterejectrateof20%withrejecttimeof 10secbeforepaxusesEUTraddesk NewEUE-gateswithatransactiontimeof 15secwouldmeanareducedrequirementof 6gates Traditionaldeskrequirement:25-30 EUE-gaterequirement:14-17 Figuresassumenoimprovementin transactiontimes,from2011survey:EU Trad21sec,EUE-gate35sec, NEU110sec(easy)/300sec(hard) EUE-gaterejectrateof20%withreject timeof10secbeforepaxusesEUTrad desk NewEUE-gateswithatransaction timeof15secwouldmeanareduced requirementof8gates RECLAIMBELTS Currentprovision9Intbelts (ofwhich1long)and2Dom belts. Beltavailableforall flightsduringbusyhour, tosupportKPIofallpax receivingbaggagewithin 45minutesofarrivalon stand. Requirement:INT:6-8(ofwhich1long70m+ belt,withnowidebodyflightsexpectedtobe splitover2belts). DOM:1beltjustsufficientthough2wouldbe idealtoreducecongestionatpeaktimes. Requirement:INT:7-8belts(ofwhichideally2 long70m+belts,although1longbeltwould besufficient,causingonly1widebodyflightto besplitover2belts). A380arrivalideallyrequires2beltfeedstoa longbelt,toimprovebaggagedeliverytime. DOM:1beltjustsufficient;2beltfeedswould berequiredtoavoidsomeflightspotentially experiencing5-10minutedelaysinaccessingit. INT:7-8belts(ofwhich2long70m+ beltstohandlewidebodiesonasingle belt;withonly1longbeltupto5 widebodiesinthemorningpeakare splitover2beltsordelayedbyupto20 minutesinaccessingthelongbelt) A380arrivalsideallyrequire2beltfeeds toalongbelt,toimprovebaggage deliverytime. DOM:1beltjustsufficient;2beltfeeds wouldberequiredtoavoidsomeflights potentiallyexperiencing5-10minute delaysinaccessingit. LANDSIDERETAIL& CATERING Cateringareaprovision (lower&Avenuelevels): 1,250m2 Retailareaprovision(lower &Avenuelevels):2,100m2 Arrivalsconcoursenon- commercialarea(lower levelonly):1,400m2 Landsidepeakoccupancy: Arrivalsconcoursepeak occupancyis~16%ofpeak hourflow+ Landsidedwellassumed ~10minutesonaverage. 1.3m2 cateringareaper personatpeakoccupancy. 0.8-1.0m2 retailareaper personatpeakoccupancy Non-commercialarea: 2.3m2 perpassengerat peak Arrivalsconcoursepeakoccupancy:370 Landsidedeparturespeakoccupancy:530 Combinedlandsidepeakoccupancy:upto900 Cateringarearequirement:upto1,170m2 Retailarearequirement:720-900m2 Arrivalsconcoursenon-commercialarea:850m2 Arrivalsconcoursepeakoccupancy:420 Landsidedeparturespeakoccupancy:570 Combinedlandsidepeakoccupancy:upto990 Cateringarearequirement:upto1,290m2 Retailarearequirement:790-990m2 Arrivalsconcoursenon-commercialarea:970m2 Arrivalsconcoursepeakoccupancy:510 Landsidedeparturespeakoccupancy: 600 Combinedlandsidepeakoccupancy: upto1110 Cateringarearequirement:upto 1,440m2 Retailarearequirement:890-1,110m2 Arrivalsconcoursenon-commercialarea: 1170m2 10
  14. 14. Gatwick st Facilities: Existing and Forecast to 2020/2021 with RAG Status including Q5 & Q5+1 Development Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D F G H Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 C D G H Appendix E EASYJETSPLITBETWEENTERMINALS&EZYCONSOLIDATEDINSOUTHTERMINAL;HIGHCASEANDBASECASE Currentprovision ServiceStandardsassumedin assessments Summer2012,basedonactual schedule SH&EHIGHCASE2016/17(37.5mppa) FacilitiesrequiredbySummer2016 SH&EHIGHCASE2020/21(41mppa) FacilitiesrequiredbySummer2020 Airline/TerminalAssumptions EZYsplitbetweenNT&ST NoTop10carriermoves EZYsplitbetweenNT&ST NoTop10carriermoves EZYsplitbetweenNT&ST EZYbalanceshifttoSTwithPier1reopen NoTop10carriermoves ANNUALPAX ST:~16.9mppa NT:~17.2mppa ST:~18.8mppa NT:~18.8mppa ST:~20.5mppa NT:~20.5mppa TOTALBUSYDAY MOVEMENTS 868 (AugustFridayschedule,snapshop atFeb12) 888943 MAXIMUMHOURLY MOVEMENTS 535355 SouthTERMINAL BUSYHOURDEPARTURES RUNWAYFLOW 3700(rollinghour)3950(rollinghour)[rollingevery30min]4250(rollinghour)[rollingevery30min] INTERNATIONALARRIVALS BUSYHOURRUNWAYFLOW 2800(rollinghour)2680(rollinghour)[rollingevery30min]3100(rollinghour)[rollingevery30min] DOMESTICARRIVALSBUSY HOURRUNWAYFLOW 430(rollinghour)380(rollinghour)[rollingevery30min]380(rollinghour)[rollingevery30min] CHECK-IN BusyHourFlow:~3600 @0700 BusyHourFlow:~3600 @0700 BusyHourFlow:~3520 @0700 TotalTraditional/BagDrop DeskProvision:186 TotalKioskProvision:31 Economy:maximumqueue timeof10minutesintotalon thebusyday(5minuteseach forkiosksandbagdrop). CIP:maximumqueuetimeof 3minutesintotalattraditional desks Assuming2011CheckIntype splits&check-inopensat -4hforLHand-2.5hforSH, TraditionalDeskandBagDrop @90%Utilisation,and10% ServiceDeskUplift: TotalTraditionalDesk Demand:159 TotalBagDropDemand:35 CombinedTraditionalDesk& BagDropDemand:194 KioskDemand@100% Utilisation:14-34 Assuminganytimecheck-in,TraditionalDesk andBagDrop@90%Utilisation,and10% ServiceDeskUplift TotalTraditionalDeskDemand:104 TotalBagDropDemand:30 CombinedTraditionalDesk&BagDrop Demand:134 KioskDemand@100%Utilisation:16-47 Assuminganytimecheck-in,TraditionalDesk andBagDrop@90%Utilisation,and10% ServiceDeskUplift TotalTraditionalDeskDemand:70 TotalBagDropDemand:44 CombinedTraditionalDesk&BagDrop Demand:114 KioskDemand@100%Utilisation:17-67 BAGGAGESYSTEM-MAKE UPPOSITIONS Provision:~143useableMUPs Assumptionsappliedtofigures from2016:onceEBSopens passengerscancheckinbags onarrivalatairport. Short-haulchutesopen90 minutesbeforeSTD,long-haul 180minutes.Chutesclose30 minutesbeforeSTD,with15 minutebufferforsuccessive flights. 100%LFsand20%contingency uplift. AssumeSHchutesopenat STD-150mins,LHatST-240 mins.Somechuteschange betweenhandlersduringthe day.Chutesclose30minutes beforeSTD,with15minute bufferforsuccessiveflights. Requirement:MUPs140(inc 20%contingency) SHchuteopeningatSTD-150,LHatSTD-240, closeatSTD-30with15minbuffer:MUPs138 AfterEBSchuteopeningatSHSTD-90,LH STD-180:MUPs109 PlannedMUPProvision:108 AfterEBSchuteopeningatSHSTD-90,LH STD-180:MUPs104 PlannedMUPProvision:108 BAGGAGESYSTEM-EARLY BAGSTORE EarlyBagStore:0 Requirement:Sparechutes tostoreearlybagsatpeak, toenablesomecarriersto continueanytimecheck-in. Requirement:675bagstorage =17MUPsat40bags/MUP AfterEBSopeningandSHchuteopeningSTD- 90,LHSTD-180: 1,940bagcapacity PlannedProvisionbyDec2014: EarlyBagStore2500+ AfterEBSopeningandSHchuteopeningSTD- 90,LHSTD-180: 1,950bagcapacity PlannedProvisionbyDec2014: EarlyBagStore2500+ CENTRALSEARCHCurrentprovision:19lanes Economy:busyhour passengersdonotqueuefor longerthan5minutesonthe busyday CIP:busyhourpassengersdo notqueueforlongerthan1 minuteonthebusyday 20-21lanes@200pph throughputs 20lanes@200pphthroughputs19lanes@200pphthroughputs. IDLTOTALAREA IDLtotalspace:~17,800m2 (Dec12audit)0.45-0.50seatsperpeak occupancypax; 1.3m2 perseat; Retail/catering-basedon GALcommercialstandards: 1.3m2 forallIDLpax,40%in catering; 3.0m2 forallIDLpax,35%in retail; Circulationspace:20%-30%of totalIDLspace Assumingcheck-inopensat -4hforLHand-2.5hforSH: BusyDayPeakOccupancy: ~3500 TotalIDLspacerecommended: atleast21,400m2 (excluding toilets,speciallounges,retail storageetc). Assuminganytimecheck-in:BusyDayPeak Occupancy:~3920 TotalIDLspacerecommended:atleast 24,100m2 (excludingtoilets,speciallounges, retailstorageetc). Assuminganytimecheck-in:BusyDayPeak Occupancy:~3820 TotalIDLspacerecommended:atleast 23,300m2 (excludingtoilets,speciallounges, retailstorageetc). IDLSEATING,RETAIL& CATERING Seatingprovision:1250 (including12PRMseats) Cateringareaprovision: 3950m2 (includingkitchenand othernon-passengerareas) with1234seats Retailareaprovision:8240m2 (likelytoreduceslightly dependingoncirculation spaceprovisioninQ5Phase2 scheme). Indicativeseatrequirement 1575-1750,tomeettarget QSMscoreonbusyday,but thisisa‘soft’constraint. Cateringarearequirement:up to4,600m2 Retailarearequirement:upto 10,500m2 . Indicativeseatrequirement1760-1960,to meettargetQSMscore,butthisisa‘soft’ constraint. Cateringarearequirement:upto5,100m2 Retailarearequirement:upto11,700m2 . Indicativeseatrequirement1720-1910,to meettargetQSMscore,butthisisa‘soft’ constraint. Cateringarearequirement:upto5,000m2 Retailarearequirement:upto11,400m2 . FLIGHTCONNECTIONS Currentprovision:1lane;can expandto2lanes Busyhourpassengersdo notqueueforlongerthan5 minutesonthebusyday 1lane@200pphthroughputs1lane@200pphthroughputs1lane@200pphthroughputs IMMIGRATIONINFLOW BusyhourEUpassengersdo notqueueforlongerthan10 minutes; Busyhournon-EUpassengers donotqueueforlongerthan 20minutes. BusyHourFlow:~2700 @1000 BusyHourFlow:~2720 @1200 BusyHourFlow:2900 @1200 IMMIGRATIONDESKS Traditionaldeskprovision:18 EUE-gateprovision:5 Rangeofdeskrequirements dependingonproactiveor reactivedeskopening. Traditionaldeskrequirement: 20-24 EUE-gaterequirement:12-16 Figuresassumeno improvementintransaction times,from2011survey:EU Trad18sec,EUE-gate40sec, NEU110sec(easy)/300sec (hard) EUE-gaterejectrateof20% withrejecttimeof10sec beforepaxusesEUTraddesk Estmax.Fridayqueuetimesof nobuildare16mins(EU)and 33mins(non-EU) Traditionaldeskrequirement:18-23 EUE-gaterequirement:16-20 Figuresassumenoimprovementintransaction times,from2011survey:EUTrad18sec,EU E-gate40sec, NEU110sec(easy)/300sec(hard) EUE-gaterejectrateof20%withrejecttimeof 10secbeforepaxusesEUTraddesk NewEUE-gateswithatransactiontimeof 15secwouldmeanareducedrequirementof 9gates 13newEUE-gatesplannedfromsummer2013 Traditionaldeskrequirement:14-18 EUE-gaterequirement:21-28 Figuresassumenoimprovementintransaction times,from2011survey:EUTrad18sec,EU E-gate40sec, NEU110sec(easy)/300sec(hard) EUE-gaterejectrateof20%withrejecttimeof 10secbeforepaxusesEUTraddesk NewEUE-passgateswithatransactiontime of15secwouldmeanareducedrequirement of12gates 13newEUE-gatesplannedfromsummer2013 RECLAIMBELTS Currentprovision7Intbelts (ofwhich2long70m+)and1 Dombelt. Beltavailableforallflights duringbusyhour,tosupport KPIofallpaxreceiving baggagewithin45minutesof arrivalonstand. Requirement:INT:7-8(inc2 longbelts,thoughtheremay beanissuewith3Virgin747 arrivalsscheduledwithin20 minutes-the3rdflightmay needtobesplitover2belts, elsedelayedinaccessinga longbeltoruseashorterbelt withresultingpaxcrowding) DOM:1beltjustsufficient Requirement:INT:7(inc2longbelts;current beltlengthssufficient,thoughonewidebody mayneedtobesplitover2smallerbelts,or bedelayedbyupto20minsinaccessinga longbelt), DOM:1beltsufficient. Requirement:INT:7-8(inc2longbelts;current beltlengthssufficient,thoughonewidebody mayneedtobesplitover2smallerbelts,or bedelayedbyupto20minsinaccessinga longbelt), DOM:1beltsufficient. LANDSIDERETAIL& CATERING Cateringareaprovision(lower &upperlevel):1,230m2 Retailareaprovision(lower& upperlevel):850m2 Arrivalsconcoursenon- commercialarea(lowerlevel only):1,870m2 Landsidepeakoccupancy: Arrivalsconcoursepeak occupancyis~20%ofpeak hourflow+ Landsidedwellassumed~10 minutesonaverage. 1.3m2 cateringareaperperson atpeakoccupancy. 0.8-1.0m2 retailareaper personatpeakoccupancy Arrivalsconcoursepeak occupancy:560 Landsidedeparturespeak occupancy:600 Combinedlandsidepeak occupancy:upto1160 Cateringarearequirement: 1,510m2 Retailarearequirement:930 -1,160m2 Arrivalsconcoursenon- commercialarea:1290m2 Arrivalsconcoursepeakoccupancy:560 Landsidedeparturespeakoccupancy:600 Combinedlandsidepeakoccupancy:upto 1160 Cateringarearequirement:1,510m2 Retailarearequirement:930-1,160m2 Arrivalsconcoursenon-commercialarea: 1290m2 Arrivalsconcoursepeakoccupancy:610 Landsidedeparturespeakoccupancy:590 Combinedlandsidepeakoccupancy:upto 1200 Cateringarearequirement:1,560m2 Retailarearequirement:960-1,200m2 Arrivalsconcoursenon-commercialarea: 1400m2 11
  15. 15. GATWICK AIRFIELD FACILITIES: PROVIDED AND FORECAST TO 2020 INCLUDING Q5 & Q5+1 DEVELOPMENTS Current Provision Service Standards assumed in assessments 2012 Based on actual schedule (34.1mppa) SH&E High Case 2016/17 (37.5mppa) SH&E High Case 2020/21 (41mppa) ANNUAL PAX ST: 16.9 mppa NT: 17.2 mppa ST: 18.4mppa NT: 19.3mppa ST: 20.5mppa NT: 20.5mppa BUSY DAY ATMS 868 888 943 PEAK HOUR ATMs 53 53 55 DAILY CAPACITY Maximum ATMs if all available daily slots are used. Sustained 55atms/hr achievable by 2020 over most of the operational day. 914 960 998 % Utilisation of Capacity on Busy Day % Utilisation of Capacity on Busy Day % Utilisation of Capacity on Busy Day RUNWAY 3 RETs and 3 RATs on 26L & 08R Maximum 10 minute delay. On a busy day almost all the available capacity is utilised and Gatwick is not able to satisfy all demand for slots. However, on other days of the year utilisation is much reduced. 95.0% 92.5% 94.5% A380 Capability Remote parking on NWzone for two code F. Diversionary (AACG) compliance on taxiways only. Compliance with CAA CAP 168 required for full service scheduled operations. Pier Service for A380 turns. AACG compliance sufficient New A380 stand on Push & Hold 125, Juliet minor works. Restrictions on P6 departure gates and Alpha hold. New A380 stand on Push & Hold 125, Juliet minor works. Restrictions on P6 departure gates and Alpha hold. Shortfall in forecast A380 Pier stand capacity by 1 stand. TAXIWAYS 5 Taxiways N-S and 3 taxiways E-W providing alternative routes to piers There is no specific service standard for taxiways although on route delays between the runway and stand should be kept to a minimum and new developments should serve to maintain or reduce taxi times. Current problems in Pier 1 cul-de sac. Similar but less severe problem in Pier 2-3 cul de sac where push back conflicts can occur. New Pier 1 realigned to avoid pushback conflicts and improve flow to Alpha hold. New Pier 1 realigned to avoid pushback conflicts and improve flow to Alpha hold. STANDS Provision: 110, 53E + 2F, 16 MARS Any arrival should have an available stand of the right size to park on at all times. Requirement equals Busy day peak occupancy + 10%. Note that MARS centrelines may be added to the total provision. MARS centrelines are only counted if they can accommodate A320 or larger. Provision: 108, (incl. 53E, 2F) + 16 MARS Provision: 109, (incl. 58E, 3F) + 19 MARS Provision: 109, (incl. 58E, 3F) + 19 MARS Requirement: 111, 31E Requirement: 115, 34E Requirement: 116, 35E Note 734 MARS are excluded from count. Stand 57 included as E MARS. Holding stands excluded. Stands 60-63 closed, gate 59 closed for deps P1 & P5 reconfigured and code F on 110 P1 & P5 reconfigured and code F on 110 NORTH TERMINAL PIER SERVED STANDS Provision: 27, 11E, 3 MARS Pier Served demand is assessed in order that 95% of passengers are pier served and there should be sufficient coaching capacity to accommodate all remote services. Very dependent on towing levelsw Provision: 28 (incl 11E) + 3 MARS Provision: 31 (incl 16E, 1F) + 6 MARS. Provision: 31 (incl 16E, 1F) + 6 MARS. Demand: 42, incl 11E Demand: 44, incl 15E + 1 F Demand: 46, incl 19E + 2F 93% PSL* 93% PSL 92% PSL ARRIVALS COACH BAYS 2 Int (TBC) & 1 Dom 95% of arrivals coaches should not need to hold for offloading passengers. 2 Int (TBC) & 1 Dom 2-3 new facility in TBF 2-3 new facility in TBF COACHING GATES 11 International coaching gates (gate 45) plus one domestic on P5 Sufficient coaching gates should be provided so that there is always a coaching gate available to accommodate busy day demand Demand for 9-10 coaching gates. 11 provided Demand for 9-10 coaching gates. 11 provided Demand for 9-10 coaching gates. 11 provided SOUTH TERMINAL PIER SERVED STANDS Provision: 36, 16E, 7 MARS Pier Served demand is assessed in order that 97% of passengers are pier served as there are only 4 coaching gates to accommodate all remote services in South Terminal. Provision: 34 (incl 16E) + 7 MARS Provision: 31 (incl 16E) + 7 MARS Provision: 31 (incl 16E) + 7 MARS Demand:35, incl 12E Demand: 37, incl 12E Demand: 40, incl 12E 98% 97% 97% ARRIVALS COACH BAYS 1 int (gate 30) & 1 dom 95% of arrivals coaches should not need to hold for offloading passengers. 1 int & 1 dom 1 int & 1 dom 1 int & 1 dom COACHING GATES Although there are 5 coaching gates provided on gates 90 - 95 , only 3 can be used simultaneously due to space constraints. plus one additional domestic to be provided on 10A. Sufficient coaching gates should be provided so that there is always a coaching gate available to accommodate busy day demand Demand for 1 gate. 4 provided Demand for 2 gates 4 provided Demand for 2 gates 4 provided *In 2012 GAL was given dispensation to deliver 93% PSL in NT while Pier 5 Development works were underway. However, an intensive towing regime was instigated during the works period enabling GAL to maintain PSL levels above 95%. 12Gatwick Airfield Facilities: Existing and Forecast to 2020/2021 with RAG Status including Q5 & Q5+1 Development
  16. 16. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 13 Conclusion Gatwick is the busiest single-runway airport in the world. During the summer peak, demand outstrips available supply. With no second runway expected until at least the mid-2020s, the existing runway needs to be better utilised, particularly on a year-round basis to provide capacity for maximising further medium term growth. The forecasts include assumptions on external shocks over the forecast period. Based on the last ten years the likelihood of an “event” is high and SH&E considered the nature of “external shocks” and their likely effect on passenger traffic and subsequent recovery rate. Economic shocks, particularly economic recessions, have typically had a larger and longer lasting negative impact on aviation growth than events such as SARS, terrorist attacks and political unrest. The Low Case represents a set of negative yet conceivable circumstances, whereby the rebound from the recent downturn is slow and prolonged, and the long term average rate of growth is weakened by economic volatility and potential negative shocks to demand. The Base Case forecast translates to a set of reasonable assumptions at the airline and market level, illustrating how growth may be achieved. Gatwick is and will remain a predominantly short haul European airport with all market sectors expected to grow. In terms of volume it will be the short haul segment that grows the most with growth on the long haul passenger segment driven by additional services from new and established carriers at Gatwick. These new carriers could be new operators to the London market or potential spill from an increasingly constrained Heathrow market. In contrast, the High Case illustrates the volumes that may be expected if a more positive set of circumstances materialise, representing an optimistic but achievable growth path. In this scenario, a robust near-term rebound is assumed, coupled with on-going successes in attracting new carriers and routes to Gatwick now that Gatwick is free to compete and has developed a strong air service marketing approach. Over the longer term, market maturity and capacity constraints are still modelled, but to a somewhat lesser degree than in the Base Case. The Base Case represents SH&E’s most likely forecasts, taking a balanced view of the demand and supply side factors driving future traffic volumes at Gatwick. However it is worth noting that recent changes in the competitive dynamics of the London market, for example the sale of Stansted to MAG, are not assumed in the Base Case, this will be taken account of in the next forecast refresh. In spite of some major exogenous shocks, the global aviation market has grown mainly in a consistent manner, at a long term average rate of around 5-6% per annum. Growth has varied significantly by region of the world, with markets in some countries maturing earlier than others. While Europe and North America are now considered largely mature markets, some other regions such as the Middle East and Asia are still generating strong aviation growth as economies develop and expand. Recovery started in 2012 and the long term outlook for aviation demand remains broadly positive. However market sentiment remains cautious and the shorter term outlook volatile with unrest in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, a recurring rise in oil prices, and fragile economic recovery in many European markets, including the UK, as well as the fortunes of the Eurozone are continuing to impact aviation demand. Over the past decade, the airline industry has been subject to a variety of external “shocks” e.g. Gulf War, SARS, 9/11 and volcanic activity, none of which could have been predicted, but all of which had a very significant impact on air travel. Due to its nature, such an event has not been built into our forecasts, but remains a very real risk.
  17. 17. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 14 Moreover we expect the recent sale of Stansted to intensify the competition with Gatwick for airlines and passengers. Increased competition between airports will also have an impact with some airports winning and others losing passenger traffic. 1.2 Gatwick Airport Master Plan Following a three-month public consultation on its draft master plan, which closed in January 2012, Gatwick Airport published a report detailing the views and opinions of local residents, businesses, MPs and Councils in April 2012. The detailed document ‘Gatwick Airport: Draft Master Plan Summary Report on Public & Community Consultation’ is available to read and can be downloaded from the Gatwick Airport website gatwickairport.com/masterplan. The final Master Plan document was published in June 2012 and is also available on the Gatwick Airport website. The Master Plan both informs and is informed by a variety of statutory planning documents that are produced by regional and local authorities, as well wider Government policy and the regulatory environment in which Gatwick operates. As mentioned in the previous CIP documents, together, the Gatwick Airport Master plan, the Development Plans and the Capital Investment Programme are intended to present a clear picture of Gatwick’s development within the current, medium and long term view and are intrinsically linked through a common ambition and strategy. The relationship between these different documents and Gatwick’s Business Plan is GAL. Illustrated in the diagram below: GAL recognises the importance of demonstrating a strong linkage between the CIP and our strategic ambition for Gatwick as described in our master plan. In the past we have used the term ‘Development Strategy’ to describe this linkage. We believe the revised GAL Business Plan (‘Connecting London to the World’, published in January 2013), goes a long way to making this connection. Chapters two to seven in the January 2013 revised GAL revised Business Plan describe our vision and strategic priorities for the airport, our traffic forecasts and the results of our passenger insight research. They also explain how we have used the latter material to create our product matrix which identifies future service outcomes, designed to deliver our ambition for Gatwick. The product matrix can be found in Appendix H. We have shared with our airline partners via a pack of illustrative plans the differing options for development that are available and how we are taking these into account when we propose specific projects to take forward.
  18. 18. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 15 Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H CHAPTER 2 Our Strategic ambition: To become London’s Airport of Choice Introduction Since December 2009, we have made huge strides in improving the infrastructure and the passenger experience to position Gatwick as London’s airport of choice. From a service quality rebate (SQR) perspective, there has been a marked improvement in Gatwick’s performance against the CAA’s SQR measures, with all measures being met each month. As outlined in Chapter 8 (Service Quality Regime) of the January 2013 GAL Business Plan, Gatwick has had considerably more success in achieving 100% compliance with its SQR measures than the other regulated south east airports. It is also no mere coincidence that Gatwick’s third birthday under new ownership coincides with a host of industry recognition, with no less than seven industry awards comprising Best UK airport at the British Travel Awards 2012, UK airport of the year at the 2012 Travel Agents Choice awards, Best Security & Immigration Experience award at the Future Travel Experience awards 2012, Best airport in social media at the ‘Simplifying’ Digital awards. Increasingly passengers have more choice as to which airport they fly from and airlines have alternative bases from which to operate. As we compete to grow and attract new routes and airlines as well as passengers in the competitive South East airport market, we also need to ensure we continue to deliver facilities for both our airline partners and passengers in a cost effective manner. It is only by delivering continued improvement in the passenger experience at Gatwick and meeting the needs of a varying customer base that we will become London’s airport of choice. Our ambition The way in which we have sought to compete since December 2009 is encapsulated in our ambition to ‘’compete to grow and become London’s airport of choice”. In the 2012 CIP, we explained how our ambition to ‘’compete to grow and become London’s airport of choice” is translated into six strategic priorities and how these strategic priorities provide a high level strategic direction for our development planning.
  19. 19. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 16 1. Deliver the best passenger experience by listening to our passengers and delivering the kind of service that will make them choose to fly from Gatwick. 2. Help our airlines grow by understanding their goals and developing commercial partnerships 3. Increase value and efficiency by maximising income from retail, property and car parks, lowering our operating costs and investing efficiently 4. Protect and enhance our reputation by building strong and constructive relationships with our stakeholders based on openness and trust 5. Build a strong environment, health and safety culture by maintaining a relentless focus on achieving zero incidents 6. Develop the best people, processes and technology by investing in high performing people, driving continuous improvement and deploying the right systems. These strategic priorities are then cascaded down to the individual objectives of each of our members of staff. From Strategic Priorities to Passenger Commitments Underpinning these six strategic priorities is the recognition that to become London’s airport of choice in a competitive market, we need to put the passenger first. In 2010, Gatwick became the first UK airport to publish passenger commitments, which are central to our service focus and have been endorsed by our airline partners, handling agents and the UK Border Force (formerly known as UK Border Agency). These passenger commitments, outlining the service standards our passengers can expect, are the results of the collaborative work undertaken with our partners and centre on three core pledges: • We’ll treat you as our guest • We hate queues • We love to be on time
  20. 20. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 17 SUMMARY OF CAPITAL INVESTMENT AT GATWICK IN Q5 Under new ownership, we are on track to deliver the current capital programme, with 82% of the £1,172 billion capital investment programme either completed or nearing completion as at 31st March 2013. Appendix A outlines the forecast phased capital of all major projects as well as projects completed in the current quinquennium (Q5). The following section describes on-going capital works across Gatwick that this phased forecast spend represents that will enable Gatwick to ‘compete to grow and become London’s Airport of Choice’. These projects have been developed and delivered with input from the airline community through project working groups, the Capital Programme Board (CPB) and the Joint Steering Group (JSG). The 2012 CIP covered the period November 2011 to end March 2012. Following on from the last publication, the 2013 CIP covers the period April 2012 up to and including March 2013. Overview of capital investment since April 2012 The total spend since the start of the financial year to date, from April 2012 to March 2013, totals £221.9m, whilst the Q5 total spend to date since the start of the current quinquennium from 2008 to March 2013 totals £958.1m. Since April 2012, several projects have either been delivered or nearing completion. Out in the airfield, the rehabilitation of Gatwick’s most critical asset, the Main runway, has been undertaken, whilst keeping the world’s busiest single runway operational for the critical parts of the day. Over the course of the nine-month project, 400,000sqm of runway was resurfaced using 65,000 tonnes of Marshall Asphalt, the airfield ground lighting was upgraded with the installation of 1,900 runway and taxiway lights, and 530km of electrical cabling and 38km of ducting installed. The rehabilitation of Taxiways Papa and November were completed in August 2012. The airfield asset replacement programme comprising stand rehabilitation, replacement of airfield ground lighting, Fixed Electrical Ground Power units and Lighting columns is on-going whilst the Stand Entry Guidance Systems (SEGS) project was delivered in November 2012. The Pier 5 project, which aims to deliver improved Pier Service levels to meet future growth in passenger numbers in the North Terminal, is currently well underway. Pier service levels will be enhanced through stand reconfiguration and provision of independent centrelines access and provision of vertical segregation for arriving and departing passengers. Structural works will be completed in February 2013 and the completion of Phase 1 is planned in July 2013, whilst Phase 2 works are due for completion in May 2014. In November 2012, Gatwick awarded its largest construction contract to date to demolish Pier 1 and construct a new building in the South Terminal to house both a new baggage system and a new pier. At a total cost of £178.9 million for both phases, this project is Gatwick’s biggest capital investment in recent years. It is also a historic milestone for Gatwick as the pier is one of the oldest assets in South Terminal, first opened in 1958. The ST Baggage and Pier 1 project, which in fact brings two separate projects together into a single build solution, will entail the demolition of Gatwick’s original 1950s Pier. Phase 1 of the South Terminal Baggage and Pier 1 project comprising the replacement of the hold baggage screening (HBS) facility was completed by September 2012. Phase 2 comprising the construction of a new ST baggage factory and brand new pier with 5 fully serviced stands, entailing the demolition of the existing Pier 1 and delivery of an automated baggage storage facility, will be completed in 2015. The new two-storey Pier has been designed with the passenger in mind at every step, with quick and easy access from the departure lounge to the bright new gate rooms, linked to five new aircraft stands by air-bridges. With views over the airfield, the new gate rooms will also include new style seating and child- friendly zones.
  21. 21. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 18 Within the heart of the building will be a new baggage system that will allow bags to be processed faster and enable our airlines the opportunity to use automated fast-bag drops. There will be an automated bag store too, giving airlines the ability to offer flexible check-in. In the North Terminal, exciting improvements were brought to the passenger experience in the North Terminal with the opening of Jamie’s Italian and Yo! Sushi restaurants in June 2012. The opening of Jamie’s Italian in the North Terminal is a great example of how Gatwick is competing to become London’s airport of choice with Gatwick being recognised as having delivered the best travel restaurant throughout the travel industry in 2012. The A380 on Stand 125 project came into service in March 2013 under the original budget of £6.5m, with the first A380 using the stand on 26th March. There has also been a major upgrade to the baggage system to increase capacity and improve efficiency in the North Terminal, with the NT Baggage project completed in December 2012. In the South Terminal, the ST IDL Phase 1 Project was opened in July 2012, providing a brand new ST walk through duty free facility. Gatwick South Terminal Security facility, the benchmark standard for UK airports, continues to win yet more awards, the latest being the Best Security & Immigration Experience award at the 2012 Future Travel Experience awards. The ST Departure Lounge Phase 2 achieved tollgate 4 in December 2012. As at January 2013, the preliminary design is complete. Enabling works are completing with the strip out old WDF and other shops. This project is expected to be fully delivered by January 2014, with the first phase complete in July 2013. The refurbishment of Atlantic House, as part of the Crew Reporting solution is due for completion in July 2013. The installation of the Jubilee House HBS equipment was completed in September 2012. Appendix A - Phased Capital Investment Programme 2013 shows a phased forecast spend for the current regulatory cycle, April 2008 – March 2014. Q5 - Key Metric The graph below shows actual capital expenditure per year for Q5 to date and the forecast for the remaining year: 104.0 181.4 211.4 239.3 221.9 213.9 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 £million Financial Year ending 31 March Q5 Capital Expenditure Actual Forecast
  22. 22. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 19 The above commentary is not exhaustive but gives an indication of the scale and range of improvements that are underway or planned in the current Q5 regulatory cycle to enable Gatwick to compete to grow and retain airline and passenger traffic. In Chapter 5 individual project description sheets (PDS) have been provided, outlining cost breakdowns for all the major projects and programmes in the Q5 CIP with a budget greater than £5 million. Overview of recently completed projects and current & future milestones The following sections provide an overview of recently completed projects and significant milestones achieved since April 2012 up to end of March 2013. Projects TG1 TG2 TG3 TG4 TG5 TG6 Comments including trigger dates where applicable Major Projects completed since April 2012 NT Extension N/A N/A N/A Oct-09 Dec-11 Feb-13 Achieved trigger requirements in December 2011 ST Security - Phase 3 IDL works N/A Aug-11 Sep-11 Oct-11 Nov-12 Feb-13 ST Immigration Hall Reconfiguration N/A Aug-10 Aug-10 Sep-10 Feb-12 May-12 Main Runway Rehabilitation Jun-10 Oct-10 Jul-11 Jul-11 Nov-12 May-13 NT Baggage (NTB) N/A N/A N/A Feb-10 Dec-12 May-13 ST Baggage Phase 1 (HBS installation) Apr-10 Apr-10 May-10 Oct-10 Aug-12 Apr-13 NT Security ( Phase 2) May-11 Jun-11 Jun-11 Oct-11 May-12 Nov-12 A380 on Stand 125 Jun-11 Aug-11 Dec-11 May-12 Feb-13 Mar-13 Other Significant Milestones achieved since April 2012 Papa November Taxiways Mar-11 Aug-11 Aug-11 Nov-11 Jun-12 Sep-13 Special Branch & UKBF accommodation Nov-12 Jan-13 NT IDL Reconfiguration N/A Sep-11 Dec-11 Dec-11 Jun-12 : Project 1 Feb-13 Project scope reduced ST IDL Reconfiguration Ph-2 Dec-11 Feb-12 Jul-12 Dec-12 Dec-13 Mar-14 ST Baggage Phase 2 Apr-10 May-10 Jun-11 Jul-12 May-15 : Baggage Factory June-15 : Baggage Factory Pier 1 closure in Apr-13; Pier 1 Gates 1-5 in Mar-15. Trigger date : 31 Dec 2013 (enabling works and demolition works) Future Milestones - as at 31 March 2013 Piers, Infrastructure & Airfield Pier 5 - Phase 1 N/A N/A Apr-11 Dec-11 Jul-13 Aug-13 Phase 1 completion : Trigger date : 16 Sep 2013 ; Phase 2 TG 5 & 6 in May 2014 NT Additional Pier Service May-10 Jun-12 Jun-13 Dec-15 Jan-17 NT Baggage Voids Jul-11 N/A Apr-13 N/A Dec-13 ST Baggage Phase 2 Apr-10 May-10 Jun-11 Jul-12 May-15 : Baggage Factory Jun-15 : Baggage Factory Pier 1 closure in Apr-13; Pier 1 Gates 1-5 in Mar-15. Trigger date : 31 Dec 2013 ( enabling works and demolition works) Surface Water Pond D Jul-10 Nov-10 Dec-11 Dec-11 Apr-13 May-13 Airfield Operations Building Apr-11 Apr-11 Dec-11 Jul-12 Nov-13 Jan-14 ADCM55 Apr-11 Apr-11 Dec-11 Jul-12 Nov-13 Jan-14 Taxiway AGL Aug-12 Aug-12 Jun-13 Oct-13 Nov-14 Nov-14 95% Pier Service N/A N/A t Apr-14 Oct-17 Jan-18 Gatwick Stream Flood Attenuation Mar-12 Apr-12 Aug-12 Mar-13 Jan-14 Jun-14 Consolidated Security Gate N/A Mar-12 Mar-13 Jul-14 Oct-14 Nov-14 Entrance Bridge Cladding Feb-11 Aug-11 Apr-12 Apr-12 Nov-13 Dec-13 Terminals ST IDL Reconfiguration Phase 2 Dec-11 Feb-12 Jul-12 Dec-12 Dec-13 Mar-14 Trigger date: 31 March 2014 Crew Reporting N/A N/A Jun-11 Jun-12 Jul-13 Aug-13 Trigger date: 31 August 2013 Domestic Arrivals N/A N/A Jan-12 May-12 Apr-13 Apr-13 ST & NT Border Force Arrivals Zones Apr-12 Oct-12 Jul-13 Aug-13
  23. 23. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 20 ‘Q5+1’ EXTENSION YEAR – STATUS OF PROJECTS AS AT END OF March 2013 Since late May 2012, weekly meetings have been held between GAL and the Airport Consultative Committee (ACC) representative to discuss capital expenditure for the relevant Q5+1 minor projects and to receive the ACC’s endorsement for individual projects. Both the Capital Programme Board (CPB) and Joint Steering Group (JSG) are kept informed on a monthly basis of the tracked forecast spend. This process, ratified by the ACC, has ensured that there is sufficient airline consultation and governance around the Q5+1 list of projects. The sections below give an overview of both minor and major projects either endorsed by the JSG, or currently being considered by the ACC. Also included is the list of projects not supported by the ACC. ACC Supported Major Projects Since May 2012 and until 31 March 2013, the following list of ‘Q5+1’ major projects totalling £163.2 m have been endorsed by the ACC for progression: 1. Rail Station Contribution 2. NT Additional Pier Service - Pier 5 3. South Terminal Baggage & Pier 1 4. Crew Reporting 5. ST Domestic Arrivals 6. ST Entrance Bridge Cladding 7. Surface Water Infrastructure (Q5+1 phase) 8. Airfield Peak Cap Expansion ACDM55 - phase 2 9. NT IDL Reconfiguration phase 1 10. UKBA Arrivals Phase 1 11. NT IDL Reconfiguration phase 2 12. Flood Alleviation 13. ST IDL Reconfiguration 14. Consolidated Security Gate (ACC support anticipated at April JSG) 15. Gatwick Stream Flood Attenuation (ACC support given at March JSG) ACC Supported Minor Works Projects The list below provides an overview of the various minor projects (whose budget is above £1 million) endorsed by the ACC since June 2012. Altogether there are approximately 43 minor projects each with their respective estimated budget, totalling £53.7 million comprising: 1. ST Statutory Accommodation Compliance 2. LEPC 3. Remote Stand SEGS 4. S1/S2 Switchboard Replacement 5. NT Foul Rising Main Augmentation 6. Norfolk House Refurbishment
  24. 24. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 21 7. Low Voltage Electricity 8. Vehicle replacement 9. ST Landside Arrivals & Onward Travel 10. Life safety systems 11. HVAC systems 12. Property asset replacement 13. CCTV replacement 14. IT Core Infrastructure - Node Room Remediation 15. IT Infrastructure Platform upgrade 16. Check-in Common Bag Drop 17. Airfield Peak Capacity Expansion (ACDM – Phase 1) 18. IT Operations Centre 19. Minor works, building and fabric 20. Substations (Airfield) 21. FEGP (asset replacement only) 22. ST IDL Toilets (outside the Beehive Pub) 23. Gatwick Connect Pilot 24. Security Fixed Posts ACC Major Projects still under ACC consideration The A380 on Stand (Pier 6) is yet to obtain full ACC support as at 31 March 2013. Projects still under ACC consideration The following projects totalling £15.7m are being considered by the ACC: 1. Taxiway rehabilitation including AGL 2. Staff Car Parks 3. Minor projects – various (under £500k each) Projects not endorsed by ACC The following projects amounting to £15.7 m in total are not supported by the ACC: 1. Check-in Common Bag Drop (representing remainder of spend following individual trials – all of which have been supported by the ACC) 2. NT Early Bag Store 3. NT Staff Restaurant 4. UKBA Arrivals Phase 2 – South Terminal 5. Crew Reporting - the budget increase at TG4 from £14m to £20.55m (The scope of the Crew report- ing project was endorsed by the JSG/ACC, however, the budget increase from £14m to £20.55m is not supported by the ACC).
  25. 25. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 22 As mentioned in the 2012 CIP, the 6 year Q5 capital programme consists of major projects and programmes comprising current live projects, rolling programmes and a number of new projects required between February 2011 (when the Q5+1 programme was constructed) and the end of the quinquennium (March 2014). Many of these projects were already in the Q5 programme. Some are new whilst others will either be completed in the extension year 2013/2014 or into the period beyond Q5. Examples of major projects which carry over from Q5 into the period beyond Q5 are NT Additional Pier Service – Pier 5, ST Baggage and Pier 1 and Rail Station improvement works. Beyond Q5 – Our Revised Business Plan The formal process of Constructive Engagement with the airline community for the post Q5 period commenced in April 2012, with the submission of the initial GAL Business plan, as requested by the CAA. Once the business plan was published in April 2012, the CAA instructed the airport and its airlines to take the main elements of the Initial Business Plan through a process of Constructive Engagement. This was a multi-lateral process in which various elements of the business plan were discussed in a structured, transcript format. The subjects covered were agreed in advance with the CAA and the airlines in the form of the Constructive Engagement mandate. In total, GAL had 33 Constructive Engagement meetings. Topics covered included: • Traffic forecasts; • Capital expenditure; • Service quality; • Operating expenditure; and • Commercial revenues. Changes since April 2012 Initial Business Plan As a result of Constructive Engagement, and due to other developments during 2012, some elements of the business plan have been changed. A new revised business plan (RBP) was thus launched in February 2013. It is worth noting that the traffic forecasts now show Gatwick reaching only 35.9 million passengers in 2018/19, down from the 37.3 million passengers forecast for the same year in the Initial Business Plan. The capital expenditure total of £1.15bn in the April 2012 business plan has been reduced to £967.17m. This reflects a lack of airline support for some projects, as well as the reduced traffic forecasts delaying the need for some projects to the early 2020s. The table below provides a high level summary (in 2013/2014 prices) of the revised Capital Programme for the period between the end of Q5 (1 April 2014) and 31 March 2019, totalling £967.17 million. Also shown is the predicted capital spend for the following 5 year period up to 2024.
  26. 26. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H Capital programme summary by year BUSINESS PLAN - EASYJET SPLIT - PROGRAMME APPROACH 10 YEAR PLAN High Case (July 2013) easyJet Split - (v15 dated 21.06.2013) 23 BUSINESS PLAN - EASYJET SPLIT - PROGRAMME APPROACH 10 YEAR PLAN High Case (July 2013) easyJet Split - (v15 dated 21.06.2013) 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 2022/23 2023/24 ASSET STEWARDSHIP AIRFIELD 6.70£ 6.95£ 15.33£ 23.67£ 32.05£ 84.70£ 28.00£ 36.00£ 39.50£ 34.50£ 34.50£ 172.50£ FACILITIES 28.78£ 42.72£ 38.50£ 29.13£ 24.38£ 163.51£ 29.50£ 41.50£ 31.50£ 29.00£ 27.50£ 159.00£ COMMERCIAL 8.11£ 11.55£ 10.09£ 8.19£ 7.21£ 45.15£ 9.50£ 9.50£ 9.50£ 9.50£ 9.50£ 47.50£ COMPLIANCE & RISK 9.38£ 15.30£ 5.28£ 4.88£ 4.89£ 39.73£ 6.10£ 8.10£ 8.10£ 5.10£ 6.60£ 34.00£ I.T. 10.27£ 8.67£ 3.57£ 7.89£ 3.77£ 34.17£ 10.00£ 10.00£ 10.00£ 10.00£ 10.00£ 50.00£ TOTAL ASSET STEWARDSHIP 63.24£ 85.19£ 72.77£ 73.76£ 72.30£ 367.26£ 83.10£ 105.10£ 98.60£ 88.10£ 88.10£ 463.00£ CARRY OVER PROJECTS ST Baggage & Pier 1 65.60£ 23.00£ -£ -£ -£ 88.60£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Pier 5 2.89£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 2.89£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Gatwick Stream Flood Attenuation 0.39£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 0.39£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Consolidated Security Gate 0.96£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 0.96£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ FEGP Replacement 0.05£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 0.05£ River Mole 0.31£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 0.31£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 70.20£ 23.00£ -£ -£ -£ 93.20£ TOTAL ASSET REPLACEMENT PLUS CARRY OVERS 133.44£ 108.19£ 72.77£ 73.76£ 72.30£ 460.46£ 83.10£ 105.10£ 98.60£ 88.10£ 88.10£ 463.00£ CORE PROJECTS - 2013/14 - 2018/19 Delivery of 95% Pier Service (North Terminal) 5.15£ 50.35£ 81.39£ 37.90£ 0.66£ 175.45£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ NT Security Reconfiguration 6.11£ 8.42£ 7.46£ 3.18£ -£ 25.17£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Early Bag Store 1.02£ 1.23£ 10.57£ 10.22£ 0.96£ 24.00£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Upgrade Check In & Bag Drop & NT Ceilings and Floors 0.54£ 1.61£ 2.73£ 2.31£ 16.81£ 24.00£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Upgrade Check In & Bag Drop ST 0.50£ 1.60£ 2.61£ 2.52£ 10.37£ 17.60£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ NT Border Zone -£ 0.76£ 1.47£ 7.80£ 3.19£ 13.22£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ NT IDL Reconfiguration & Expansion 21.66£ 29.85£ 26.44£ 9.82£ -£ 87.77£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Runway 2 5.70£ 4.30£ -£ -£ -£ 10.00£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Business Systems Transformation 3.29£ 3.29£ 3.29£ 2.97£ 2.95£ 15.79£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Stand Reconfigurations 0.74£ 7.53£ 1.47£ 0.26£ -£ 10.00£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Product Development - Car Parking -£ -£ -£ 0.61£ 4.39£ 5.00£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Digital Media - Return 0.08£ 2.59£ 0.82£ 0.15£ 1.66£ 5.30£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ CIP Departures 0.14£ 2.16£ -£ -£ -£ 2.30£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ NT Baggage Reclaim -£ -£ 0.18£ 1.34£ 1.28£ 2.80£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ NT Arrivals Transformation 0.84£ 2.67£ 8.35£ -£ -£ 11.86£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ ST IDL Capacity -£ 0.51£ 1.28£ 11.27£ 16.94£ 30.00£ 18.18£ 15.82£ -£ -£ -£ 34.00£ CIP Arrivals 0.15£ 1.99£ -£ -£ -£ 2.14£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Additional NT Coaching Bays 0.15£ 0.30£ 0.78£ 1.18£ -£ 2.41£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ ST Public Transport / Accessibility 0.51£ 0.40£ 3.33£ 4.96£ -£ 9.20£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Stands 551 and 552 1.26£ 8.09£ -£ -£ -£ 9.35£ Hangar 5.35£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 5.35£ Minor Development Projects 2.00£ 2.00£ 2.00£ 2.00£ 2.00£ 10.00£ Consolidated Car Rental and Motor Transport Facility 0.45£ 1.58£ 5.97£ -£ -£ 8.00£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 55.64£ 131.23£ 160.14£ 98.49£ 61.21£ 506.71£ 101.28£ 120.92£ 98.60£ 88.10£ 88.10£ SUBTOTAL 189.08£ 239.42£ 232.91£ 172.25£ 133.51£ 967.17£ 101.28£ 120.92£ 98.60£ 88.10£ 88.10£ 497.00£ DEVELOPMENT ROJECTS - 2013/14 - 2018/19 HBS Replacement 8.54£ 6.24£ 72.06£ 61.79£ 9.58£ 158.21£ Liquid Detection -£ 0.40£ 1.25£ -£ -£ 1.65£ Gatwick Express Rolling Stock - Capital Contribution -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ SUBTOTAL 197.62£ 246.06£ 306.22£ 234.04£ 143.09£ 1,127.03£ 101.28£ 120.92£ 98.60£ 88.10£ 88.10£ 497.00£ PROJECTS - 2019/20 - 2023/24 Long Stay Capacity (Decking) Post 2019 -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 2.00£ 5.00£ 12.50£ 10.80£ 8.00£ 38.30£ CIP Building Replacement (North Terminal) -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 10.00£ 10.00£ -£ -£ -£ 20.00£ North Terminal Avenue Reconfiguration -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 2.00£ 5.00£ 5.00£ -£ -£ 12.00£ North Terminal Baggage Reclaim Reconfiguration -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 3.00£ 15.00£ 23.00£ 23.00£ 64.00£ NT Short Stay Car Park -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 1.80£ 9.10£ 9.10£ -£ -£ 20.00£ Security Gate -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 3.00£ 2.45£ 5.45£ ST Baggage Reclaim -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 1.00£ 1.00£ 5.00£ 5.00£ -£ 12.00£ Additional Staff Car Park Capacity -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 2.50£ 2.90£ -£ -£ -£ 5.40£ NT IDL Phase 2 (Post 2019) -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 20.00£ 20.00£ 13.00£ -£ -£ 53.00£ Baggage Capacity Expansion (Post 2019) -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 2.00£ 2.00£ 8.00£ 8.00£ 20.00£ Railway Contribution -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 10.00£ 10.00£ 10.00£ 10.00£ 10.00£ 50.00£ Railway Station Upgrade -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Bridge Over Railway -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 1.00£ 1.50£ 7.50£ 10.00£ 20.00£ Urban Space Development -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 2.00£ 2.00£ 2.00£ 6.00£ ST Short Stay MSCP -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 2.00£ 10.00£ 8.00£ -£ 20.00£ Product Development - Car Parking, Post 2019 -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 2.00£ 2.00£ 2.00£ -£ -£ 6.00£ Terminals Works Post 2019 -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 5.00£ 8.50£ 10.00£ 10.00£ 10.00£ 43.50£ Piers Works (Post 2019) -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 12.00£ 17.00£ 17.00£ 17.00£ 17.00£ 80.00£ CIP Growth -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Airfield Capacity / Reconfiguration Works Post 2019 -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Commercial Products -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 5.00£ 5.00£ 5.00£ 5.00£ 5.00£ 25.00£ Buy Back Cargo -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ New Build Office Development -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Industrial Bays -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 4.00£ 4.00£ 4.00£ 4.00£ 4.00£ 20.00£ GASHCO -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ Landside Restaurant -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ -£ 1.00£ 1.00£ 6.00£ -£ 8.00£ 77.30£ 108.50£ 124.10£ 119.30£ 99.45£ 528.65£ SUBTOTAL 197.62£ 246.06£ 306.22£ 234.04£ 143.09£ 1,127.03£ 178.58£ 229.42£ 222.70£ 207.40£ 187.55£ 1,025.65£ -£ PROJECT NAME 5 YEAR TOTAL 5 YEAR TOTAL
  27. 27. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 24 Summary The total expenditure outlined in this investment plan for the 6 year Q5 totals £1,172 million in out-turn prices. We are continually striving to deliver more value for less by working more efficiently, ensuring that the right projects appearing in the CIP have been fully explored considering people, process, systems and infrastructure. Looking ahead to 2014 and beyond, there is significant further investment required to expand current facilities where required, achieve greater operational efficiency and improve the passenger experience for all of our passenger segments. Beyond 2014, we are forecasting approximately £967.17 million of capital expenditure between 2014 and 2019, thereby continuing a similar rate of expenditure and improvement since the airport changed hands in December 2009. This document represents a CIP issued as an output of and for the purposes of further consultation and thus does not represent a mandatory investment programme.
  28. 28. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 3.1 Capital Investment and the Regulatory and Legislative Context Introduction Capital development at Gatwick, as outlined in this chapter, takes place within a framework of regulatory and legislative policy. Current Economic Regulation The current legislation which covers the economic regulation of airports is the Airports Act 1986 and the Civil Aviation Authority (Economic Regulation of Airports) Regulations 1986. Economic regulation applies in general to airports at which annual turnover has exceeded £1 million in two of the last three financial years. Gatwick is currently a designated airport, regulated under the Airports Act 1986 and is therefore subject to economic regulation by the CAA. This regulation determines the level of airport charges Gatwick can charge its customers for the provision of services and establishes quality standards for those services. Regulatory bodies that influence Gatwick’s operations include: • The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), the UK’s independent aviation sector regulator that is responsible for airspace policy, safety regulation, consumer protection and the economic regulation of airports. • The Competition Commission (CC), via an automatic referral from the CAA, is involved in the price control determinations for Gatwick, as well as being the UK’s overall competition regulator. • The Department for Transport (DfT) is responsible for UK aviation policy and is currently undertaking a review of the economic regulation of airports. The CAA (with an automatic referral to the Competition Commission) conducts a regulatory review every five years (known as the quinquennium), reviewing the setting of the level of airport charges at Gatwick every five years .The latest regulatory review took place in 2007/08 (i.e. price control review), where the regulator set the price cap for airport charges effective 1st April 2008 to 31st March 2013. The review covers two major aspects of Gatwick’s business: • The maximum level of charges that Gatwick can levy. In practice this has meant the CAA determining annual increases in revenue from airport charges per passenger restricted to not more than the rate of inflation (Retail Price Index) plus or minus x percentage points. • Gatwick’s conduct in relation to customers, business partners and suppliers. The regulator is required to ensure that Gatwick acts in the interest of users. Q5 extension In February 2011 the CAA consulted on extending the current five-year regulatory period by one year to end on 31 March 2014 and published its decision in March 2011 formalising the extension. Beyond Q5 The formal process of Constructive Engagement at Gatwick for the period beyond the end of Q5 commenced on 1 April 2012 with the publication of Gatwick’s initial business plan and ended in December 2012 with the publication of a joint (ACC/Gatwick) response to the CAA summarising the outputs of constructive engagement. CHAPTER 3 Consultation on the Capital Investment Programme 25
  29. 29. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 26 Review of the economic regulatory framework Review of the economic regulatory framework Background The Queen’s Speech (Airport Economic Regulation Bill) in May 2010 set out the intention of the new coalition Government to reform the law on the regulation of airports. Under the existing regime, the CAA has 4 duties for the purposes of economic regulation, these are: • to further the reasonable interests of users of airports within the UK. Users comprises airlines, passengers and other user of air transport services at the airport • to promote the efficient, economic and profitable operation of such airports • to encourage investment in new facilities at airports in time to satisfy anticipated demands by the users of such airports • to impose the minimum restrictions that are consistent with the performance by the CAA of its functions. In July 2010, the Government detailed its proposals for reform, and in March 2011 the Civil Aviation Bill was introduced in Parliament. In March 2011 the government also published ‘developing a sustainable framework for UK aviation: scoping document’. This document asked a series of questions about the future direction of aviation policy. The responses to the scoping document were subsequently used to inform the development of the draft aviation policy framework which the government published in July 2012 for consultation, and which closed in October 2012. The Civil Aviation Bill completed its passage through Parliament on 20 November 2012. Future Regulation The new Civil Aviation Act The Civil Aviation Act became law on 19 December 2012 and paves the way for airports to offer better facilities and information for passengers. It is anticipated that the CAA will bring the new airport economic regulatory framework fully into force in April 2014. The Act paves the way for the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) to motivate airports to deliver better facilities, provide more information for passengers and give greater incentives for airports to prepare for disruptive events such as severe weather. The Act also makes provisions for future reforms to the Air Travel Organisers’ Licensing (ATOL) scheme, which offers financial protection for holiday makers in the event of their tour operator going bust. The Act introduces, and enables, reform in 4 main areas: • the framework for economic regulation of airports • the legislative framework of the Civil Aviation Authority • the Air Travel Organisers’ Licensing scheme (ATOL) • conferring certain aviation security functions currently carried out by the Department for Transport, on to the CAA - responsibility for aviation security policy remains with the Secretary of State. Under the new regulatory regime for airports, the CAA is empowered to carry out a market power test, as set out in the Act, to determine whether an airport operator should or should not be subject to economic regulation. This replaces the designation of airports for price control regulation by the Secretary of State.
  30. 30. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 27 Gatwick along with Heathrow and Stansted airports are currently designated and their current price controls, set under the Airports Act 1986, will continue to run until 31 March 2014. Over the next few months, the CAA will determine how to apply the new regime set out in the Act to the airports that are subject to economic regulation after this date. The new Act sees a number of key changes to the powers and responsibilities of the aviation regulator, the CAA, including: • giving the CAA a single overriding duty, for its airport economic functions, to further the interests of passengers and owners of cargo in the provision of airport operation services • creating a flexible licensing regime for regulated airports, enabling the CAA to include licence conditions that require airports to respond more effectively when things go wrong (e.g. severe weather) • allowing the CAA, where appropriate, to replace fixed price caps on airports with lighter touch forms of regulation and removing unnecessary central government involvement from airport regulation • giving the CAA more effective enforcement powers, allowing it to impose sanctions of up to 10% of an airport operator’s annual turnover and daily amounts of 0.1% of turnover for breaching licence conditions • providing the CAA with a new role in promoting better public information about airline and airport performance levels, enabling passengers to make informed decisions when making travel arrangements • providing the CAA with a new role to promote better public information about the environmental effects of aviation and measures taken to mitigate adverse effects • conferring certain aviation security functions currently carried out by the Department for Transport, on to the CAA. Responsibility for aviation security policy, and giving aviation security directions to industry, will remain with the Secretary of State Under the new measures the CAA will have a single primary duty and a number of further duties to which the CAA must have regard in carrying out the primary duty for the purposes of airport economic regulation. Primary duty: to further the interests of passengers and owners of cargo (both present and future), in the provision of airport operation services and to do so, wherever appropriate, by promoting competition. Further duties comprising: • to ensure that licence holders are able to finance their provision of airport operation services • to secure that all reasonable demands for airport operation services are met • to promote economy and efficiency on the part of licence holders in their provision of airport operation services at regulated airports • to secure that licence holders are able to take reasonable measures to reduce, control or mitigate adverse environmental effects of the airport to which the licence relates and aircraft using that airport • to have regard to guidance issued by the Secretary of State • to have regard to any international obligation of the UK notified to it by the Secretary of State • to have regard to the principles of better regulation In addition the CAA will have a duty not to impose or maintain unnecessary burdens.
  31. 31. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 28 3.2 Consultative structure and Annex G The current consultative structure at Gatwick, born out of the Constructive Engagement process started in July 2005, which was initially focussed on the collaborative development Q5 between GAL and its airline community. Five years into Q5, the consultative dialogue between GAL and its airlines continues as an on-going process at Gatwick, helping in the assessment of the high-level options for the development of the airport. This includes details of costs for each option, impact on user charges, constructability, future- proofing, operational efficiency and, where possible, future airline costs. Consultative Structure The following diagram represents the current consultative structure at Gatwick: Annex G Prior to the commencement of Q5, Gatwick airport and its airlines were invited by the CAA to consult on updating the existing agreement on information disclosure and consultation on investment plans. The outputs of this consultative process were passed over to the CAA for final adjudication. The CAA published the final agreement, namely Annex G incorporating its verdict on the outstanding issues of disagreement in its March 2008 Decision Document. A copy of Annex G can be seen in Appendix G. Appendix E contains a summary of airline consultation at Gatwick since April 2012. This summary includes details of meetings and working groups relating to the development of Gatwick. The agenda items and topics of discussion between Gatwick and the airline community are listed by date and forum. Also included is a list of the agreements and disagreements in Appendix F since April 2012. Consultation and the Design for Six Sigma (DfSS) Process In order to adhere to Annex G consultation between the airport and airlines must take place: • prior to Tollgate 2 decision(Brief) and • prior to Tollgate 3 decision (Options) and • prior to Tollgate 4 decision (Construction Decision) Summary business cases are provided as soon as possible in draft form and finalised at Tollgate 4 as a method of articulating both the business case and cost benefit analysis. Business case summaries in effect Joint Steering Group CommunicaƟons and Feedback ACC ACC ConsultaƟve structure e.g. ACC airport charges annual meeƟng. ACC members will also be represented at joint working groups. AOC AOC ConsultaƟve Structure AOC members will also be represented at joint working groups - 9,1&1-(0#H(3& 0<2)*(1&1,5&*)",-& 2$3&"%<()&1,5J *)",-1&21& )(K,#)(3& JointWorkingGroups Joint Working Structure AOC/IATA Structure Capital ConsultaƟon for Beyond Q5 projects Capital Programme Board plus Working groups, set up to fact find for specific issues & projects -scheduled throughout the year Charges Group plus specified charges sub- group and other sub-groups as required Input through membership groups, communicatons & feedback Recommendatons, escalaƟons & feedback Decisions, guidance, recommendaƟons & feedback
  32. 32. Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Glossary 1 2 3 4 A B C D E F G H 29 provide a clear and concise summary including details of costs for each option, impact on user charges, constructability, future-proofing, operational efficiency and, where possible, future airline costs. Over the course of Q5, Gatwick has been improving its capability and methodology for delivering projects in a complex environment of a space-constrained, ageing and regulated airport. The first phase of this improvement has been achieved with implementation of a suite of procedures and processes including the well-known Design for Six Sigma (DfSS) and Tollgate processes shown below: Engagement with our Passengers and the Wider Gatwick community The established formal structure for the collection of feedback and recommendations from Gatwick’s passengers and the wider Gatwick community can be seen next: Established in 1956, GATCOM (Gatwick Airport Consultative Committee) is a statutory advisory body constituted by Gatwick in accordance with the Civil Aviation Act 1982 (as amended by the Airports Act 1986). It has 28 appointed representatives from a wide range of interests including local authorities, civil aviation, passenger, business and community and environmental groups. A Government representative is also present at the main Committee meetings, together with Gatwick’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and GAL senior management team. PAG GATCOM Decisions, guidance, recommendations & feedback Decisions, guidance, recommendations & feedback GATCOM Steering Group

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