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Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
Content addressable network(can)
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Content addressable network(can)

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  • 1. Amit Singh Dahal g5638545 Content Addressable Network(CAN) Structured P2P Network
  • 2. Outline  Introduction  Overview  Construction  Routing  Maintenance  Evaluation  Future Improvements
  • 3. Introduction  one of the original four distributed hash table proposals, introduced concurrently with Chords, Pastry, and Tapestry.  developed at UC Berkeley  CANs overlay routing easy to understand  scalable indexing system for large-scale decentralized storage applications  has a good performance
  • 4. Overview  distributed, decentralized P2P infrastructure system that maps keys onto values  keys hashed into d dimensional Cartesian space  Interface:  insert(key, value)  retrieve(key)  associate to each node and item a unique coordinate in an d-dimensional Cartesian space
  • 5. Overview  entire space is partitioned amongst all the nodes  every node “owns” a zone in the overall space  can store data at “points” in the space  can route from one “point” to another  point  node that owns the enclosing zone
  • 6. Overview y x State of the system at time t Node Resource Zone Fig:2 dimensional space with a key mapped to a point (x,y)
  • 7. Construction Bootstrap node new node
  • 8. Construction I Bootstrap node new node 1) Discover some node “I” already in CAN
  • 9. Construction 2) Pick random point in space I (x,y) new node
  • 10. Construction (x,y) 3) I routes to (x,y), discovers node J I J new node
  • 11. Construction newJ 4) split J’s zone in half… new owns one half
  • 12. Routing  data stored in the CAN is addressed by name (i.e. key), not location (i.e. IP address)  have some routing mechanism  A node only maintains state for its immediate neighboring nodes
  • 13. Routing y Node M(x,y) N(x,y)  d-dimensional space with n zones where d=2 and n=8 2 zones are neighbor if d-1 dim overlap Algorithm: Choose the neighbor nearest to the destination M(x,y) Query/ Resource key
  • 14. Maintenance  Use zone takeover in case of failure or leaving of a node  Send your neighbor table update to neighbors to inform that you are alive at discrete time interval t  If your neighbor does not send alive in time t, takeover its zone  Zone reassignment is needed
  • 15. Evaluation  Scalability -For a uniformly partitioned space with n nodes and d dimensions: * per node, number of neighbors is 2d *average routing path is (d*n1/d)/3 hops (due to Manhattan distance routing, expected hops in each dimension is dimension length * 1/3) *Can scale the network without increasing per node state  Robustness -no single point of failure
  • 16. Future Improvements  Multi-dimension -increase in dimension reduces path length  Caching and replication techniques for better performance  Overloading the zone -increases availability, reduces path length, reduces per hop latency  Uniform partitioning -compare the volume of the zone with its neighbors -partition the zone having largest volume
  • 17. THANK YOU!!! 

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