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Introduction to the Rock Cycle: A Literacy Focus

Introduction to the Rock Cycle: A Literacy Focus

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    • 1. Original Contribution Amanda Stanley October 27, 2013 Intervention Specialist, 6th-8th grade resource classroom
    • 2. Introduction to the Rock Cycle: A Literacy Focus
    • 3. Literacy Need Scores show that students with disabilties are not passing the Ohio Achievement Assessment at the same rate as their peers. Crestwood Middle School needs to find and implement a reading program that will help all children be successful with attaining reading skills.
    • 4. Research Working on vocabulary development is one of the key components that the National Reading Panel (2000) suggests as a key to developing literacy. “The larger the reader’s vocabulary (either oral or print), the easier it is to make sense of text.” (p 13) Working with partners is another strategy that has been suggested as a way to improve reading. In a program called Reading Success (Idol, 2010), one of the key components is working with a tutor to improve reading skills. By working with a partner, students are given the opportunity to learn from each others' strengths to build their knowledge of vocabulary. The Report of the National Reading Panel has also suggested that cooperative learning in this method will help students to gain the knowledge and skills needed to be successful with the content. Susan Sze (Dec 2009) has suggested the use of “index card guides, comprehension through prereading, increasing vocabulary skills, researching a topic prior, ask vital questions, sight word bingo, flashcards, word hunts, word walls” (p 1017) as methods to help struggling readers become more successful. By using these methods students are able to be better exposed to the topic or unit at hand and allow for more learning to take place. Many of these skills are used in the RtI process and have been shown as successful with students of all ability levels. Special education students and students who are English Language Learners especially make gains from strategies that allow for the vocabulary of important units to be pre-taught and retaught throughout the lessons.
    • 5. Lesson Plan Standards: Ohio Earth and Space Science- (6th grade #1)- Describe the rock cycle and explain that there are sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks that have distinct properties (e.g., color, texture) and are formed in different ways. Acquisition of Vocabulary (6th, 7th, 8th grade. #1)- Define unknown words through context clues, author’s definition, and the author’s use of comparison, contrast and cause and effect. Objectives/Learning Outcomes: At the end of this lesson students will be able to identify the three types of rock categories, describe the rock cycle, and define several vocabulary words using their own language. Materials, Resource and Technology: For this lesson we will need KWL charts, premade flash cards with key vocabulary words, a smartboard introductory lesson on the rock cycle and rock examples (sedimentary, metamorphic, igneous).
    • 6. Steps: Lesson Plan 1. KWL Chart- Pass out to each student and ask them to complete only the K and W section. First explain that the K section is for what the students already know about the rock cycle and rock categories. The W section is for what students what to know about the topic. When everyone has had a chance to complete this, then share as a class to get the students brainstorming and thinking scientifically. 2. Students will then see a list of vocabulary words on the smartboard and be asked to work with a partner to read a few sentences about each vocabulary word. With these sentences the students will be asked to use context clues to write their own definition of the vocabulary words. 3. Students will then work with their partner to use a dictionary or electronic dictionary to define the words and compare to see if their definitions were correct. 4. The teacher will then transition the students back to their seats (if they have moved around the room to work with their partners) and show a presentation on the smartboard. 5. Using hands-on-examples, the teacher will reinforce the vocabulary words by passing around an example of the three kinds of rocks; igneous, metamorphic, sedimentary. 6. Students will then be given a set of flashcards with the important vocabulary for the unit on it for them to study from. Students will be asked to read the cards together as class first (read cards 2 times), then study them independently for 5 minutes. 7. With any remaining class time the students may work with a partner or small group to practice with the flash cards to learn the vocabulary.
    • 7. Lesson Plan Assessment/Evaluation: At the end of the lesson today, students will be given an exit slip where they are asked to draw the rock cycle and define at pick two words to define out of the following words: igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic, cementation, compaction, magma, lava, sediment, weathering, and erosion. In order to receive full credit for the exit slip assignment, students must have at least the three rock categories and arrows pointing the correct ways on their rock cycle diagram. On their definitions they must have at least one word correctly defined. Feedback will be given to students as they hand in their exit slips so they know if they will need extra help with this concept or if they have passed that component. If students are unable to complete these tasks, they will be given small group tutoring with the teacher during the study hall later that day to help assist and practice the missed concepts. At the end of the unit the students will be creating a project instead of taking a formal assessment on this unit.
    • 8. Survey 1. What sections of the plan would you like to see more differentiation options? 2. Which activities could you see working well with your group(s) of students? 3. Which activities could you see not working well with your group(s) of students? 4. What extension activities do you think your students would be successful with? 5. What scaffolding or front loading topics do you see yourself needing to cover before starting this lesson plan?
    • 9. References Idol, L. (March/April 2010) Reading success: validation of a specialized literacy program (19782007). Remedial and Special Education. 31, 2. 97-115. Retrieved from Sze, S. (Dec 2009) Mislabeled reading learning disabilities: assessment and treatment for reading difficulties in students with learning disabilities. College Student Journal. 43, 4. 1015-1019. Retrieved from NICHD (2000). Report of the national reading panel: Teaching children to read: An evidencebased assessment of the scientific research literature on reading and its implications for reading instruction: Reports of the subgroups. Washington DC: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.
    • 10. References Idol, L. (March/April 2010) Reading success: validation of a specialized literacy program (19782007). Remedial and Special Education. 31, 2. 97-115. Retrieved from Sze, S. (Dec 2009) Mislabeled reading learning disabilities: assessment and treatment for reading difficulties in students with learning disabilities. College Student Journal. 43, 4. 1015-1019. Retrieved from NICHD (2000). Report of the national reading panel: Teaching children to read: An evidencebased assessment of the scientific research literature on reading and its implications for reading instruction: Reports of the subgroups. Washington DC: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

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