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Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
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Portfolio

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  • 1. ARCHITEC ARCHITECTURE DANIELL AZALCMAN P O R T F O L I OTURE
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS: } LERNER PROJECT THE ERASERS PROJECT MANHATTAN TRANSFORMATION STUDIOS EAMES SUITCASE MIDTOWN PASSAGE BIKE-SHARE STATION LIBRARY PROJECT } NEW ORLEANS RECOVERY SEMINARS RECYCLABLES EVOLUTION OF A SKYLINE ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHYTHE MAKING OF MANHATTANVILLE
  • 3. LERNER PROJECTA graphic study and the resultant model from aproject to photograph and document the ColumbiaUniversity student center, built by functionalistarchitect (and former Columbia ArchitectureSchool Dean) Bernard Tschumi. This particulardesign attemted to capture the fragmented,effervescent quality of light as it interacts with theglass northern facade of the building, particularly PERCEPTIONduring dusk. FALL 2006
  • 4. THE ERASERS PROJECTThis project is a visual analysis of an excerpt fromAlain Robbe-Grillet’s 1953 novel The Erasers, wherethe protagonist documents his travels through ananonymous -- presumably fictitious -- French city.This model is a physical mapping of the interplaybetween the main character’s narrative consciousand his dialogue with the strangers he encountersthroughout the 30-page passage. PERCEPTION FALL 2006
  • 5. MANHATTAN TRANSFORMATIONNew York City’s zip code system is illogical and often arbitrary. Neighboring codes are seldom consecutive, and more often than not jump hugely from zip to zip. How, then, could this strange disorderliness--in a city of grids and consecutively numbered streets and avenues-- be repaired? This model attempts to address the island’s seeming lack of organization by simultaneously highlighting its gross lack of contiguity and allowing anyone to interact with the model (and thus, Manhattan) on his or her own terms. The completely malleable outer frame of the island can be shifted across all axes to reorder the zip codes in any system desired. Since each individual zip code is placed in ascending height according to its number, the first and most obvious realignment would be to create a new Manhattan with a consecutive and contiguousseries of zips. The entire structure can even be unwound and reconnected to place the codes on the island’s exterior, inverting Manhattan’s habitat from isolated island to a lake ringed bysmall communities. Structure can be set in mo- tion, and order can be created from chaos.
  • 6. ABSTRACTIONSPRING 2007
  • 7. EAMES SUITCASE Human have spent years trying to come up with creative ways to control light diffusion in interior spaces. In Charles and Ray Eames’ home, however, the two archi- tects developed a binary language of light--either fully allowing the Santa Monicasun to penetrate their house’s numerous glass panels, or completely deflecting its path with the facade’s opaque segments. This either-or construction combined with the Mondrian- esque linearity of the house’s exterior elevations drastically changed the way in which light enters and diffuses a room. In-stead of predictably and consecutively spaced windows simply designed to act as conduits for natural lighting, the geometry of the Eames House creates within the building in- tersecting and interacting volumes of sunlight that each diffuse differently throughout the interior. My suitcase aims to echo the many ways in which light and translucency interactwith each other and to capture the segmented way in which those volumes project them- selves through space. Where one section might look solid, a few abbreviated move- ments show that in fact the illusion of opacitymerely comes from a series of interacting and cooperating units which each interact differ- ently with ambient lighting. In this way, light ABSTRACTION becomes a volumetric solid; capable of creat- SPRING 2007 ing its own space within an interior.
  • 8. MIDTOWN PASSAGEMidtown Manhattan is home to dozens of mid-block passages that constitute privately ownedpublic space, most of which were created byzoning changes in the 1970s that permitted de-velopers and architects to build taller structures ifthey included public passages. This project is anexploration of how those public spaces could beenriched from their current conditions to includeprogrammatic function -- in this case, as an open- DESIGN Iair book exchange program. FALL 2008
  • 9. BIKE-SHARE STATIONThis project is an exploration of Manhattan’sperimeter and its transportation infrastructure.Situated at the 72nd Street Boat Basin, thebike-share station functions as an extension ofthe bike path, creating both a resting place forcyclists and a vista from which to observe andcontextualize the New Jersey and Lower DESIGN IManhattan skylines. FALL 2008
  • 10. LIBRARY PROJECT:PROGRAMMATIC DETAILThis project is rooted in the examination ofexisting library systems and structures in an effort tocreate a small-scale design model linking program, material,and space. The detail to the right is a section of an automated bookretrieval and reshelving system housed in the underground core of a library.The library’s main floor is left open and available for the other programmatic functionsfrequently associated with libraries
  • 11. DESIGN IISPRING 2008
  • 12. LIBRARY PROJECT:CHINATOWN SITEGiven a location at the corner of Canal and EldridgeStreets in Manhattan and a list of specific programsto include, this project is an exploration in specificsite construction. This library combines the usualfunctions of a standard NYPL branch with space foran outside organization, the Center for UrbanPedagogy. Housed in the interior core of the building,CUP’s offices are allowed to interact with the rest ofthe library through the translucent strips of plexiglassthat act as windows for the interior space and ex-trude to serve as bookshelves in the library’s exterior DESIGN IIspace. SPRING 2008
  • 13. NEW ORLEANS RECOVERYIn the wake of Hurricane Katrina, amateur photographersposted more than 500,000 images of New Orleans and thesurrounding area on photo sharing sites like Flickr,Webshots, and Pbase. This project was an attempt tocollect and organize just some of those “crowdsourced”images through a group we created on Flickr to create aninteractive map of existing conditions and ongoingrenovation in the Mississippi Gulf region.[With Jane Price Estrada, GSAPP ‘08] NEW ORLEANS SPRING 2007
  • 14. RECYCL ABLESThis project is an exploration and comparison of re-cycling programs in roughly 20 different cities aroundthe world. Analytic research and data compiled oneach region’s government-implemented recyclingprogram is supplemented by images taken by volun-teers in every city of their weekly recycling output.While perhaps less telling than raw statistical data,the photographs will serve as a visual representationof the diversity and volume of a standard household’srecyclable output, and an indicator of how successfulvarious incentive programs work across the world. ANALOG>DIGI FALL 2008
  • 15. EVOLUTION OF A SKYLINEThe image of the downtown Manhattan skyline isinstantly recognizable. For nearly a century, buildingslike the former world trade center towers weresymbols of the success of a nation. However, theevolution of the Manhattan skyline involves aconstant and cyclic process of creative destruction.Following September 11th and the destruction of theworld trade center, then-Governor George Pataki andMayor Rudy Giuliani founded the Lower ManhattanDevelopment Corporation to initiate a program calledRenewNYC. Over the next several months, the LMDCapproached 24 different architecture firms to proposetheir own plans for the site. But the decision processwas contentious and every design was rejected.In August of 2002, developer Larry Silverstein tookover the project and asked seven architecture firms tocollaborate on a join master plan for the world tradecenter. These were SOM, Foster, Shigeru Ban,Richard Meier, United Architects, Daniel Libeskind,and Peterson/Littenberg Architecture. This videoshows each of their original designs at the beginningstages of planning. In a visual description of the sky-line’s creative evolution throughout this process. ANALOG>DIGI FALL 2008[With Christopher Macies, CC ‘09]
  • 16. ARCH PHOTO FALL 2007
  • 17. THE MAKING OF MANHATTANVILLEThe Manhattanville Valley lies on the west bank ofupper Manhattan, sandwiched betweenMorningside Heights to the south and HamiltonHeights to the north. From the start of itsindustrialization in the mid-19th century, the areawas converted from wooded forest and farmland toa major transit hub for New York City -- containingthe West Harlem Piers on the Hudson, thelandmark Riverside Drive viaduct, and the city’sfirst above-ground platform for the first New YorkCity subway line at 125th Street and Broadway.By the 1950s, however, rapid urbanizationovertook the rest of the city and left Manhattanvilleon the outskirts of New York. Many of the existingstructures were relegated to storage facilities andautobody shops, and the area began to stagnatewithout any significant subculture. Today,Columbia owns most of Manhattanville, and hasplans to build another campus in the 17-acre tractfrom 125th and 133rd Streets between Broadwayand Amsterdam. This project -- which exists atwww.manhattanville.net -- is a culmination of asemester’s worth of research and nearly threeyears of photographs in an attempt to captureManhattanville as it exists now -- on the cusp of its INDEPENDENTnext major reincarnation. FALL 2008
  • 18. HCRA CETIERUT

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