• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Edtc 6340-66 copyright crash course  alberto tudon
 

Edtc 6340-66 copyright crash course alberto tudon

on

  • 561 views

Copyright Crash Course Presentation by: Alberto Tudon

Copyright Crash Course Presentation by: Alberto Tudon

Statistics

Views

Total Views
561
Views on SlideShare
498
Embed Views
63

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 63

http://albertotudon.blogspot.com 59
http://www.albertotudon.blogspot.com 4

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Edtc 6340-66 copyright crash course  alberto tudon Edtc 6340-66 copyright crash course alberto tudon Presentation Transcript

    • Understanding Copyright
      Alberto Tudόn
      ByPresenterMedia.com
    • Training Agenda
      What you should known after the training is over:
      The Public Domain and Orphan Works
      Why all works can’t be digitized.
      Content on the WebWhy everything on the web isn’t public domain.
      The Teach ActThe impact copyright laws have had on distance education
      Getting PermissionWhere you would go to get the permission you need.
      Sources
      Sources used to develop this presentation
      Fair useThe licenses that are available to the public
    • The Public Domain and Orphan Works
      How is an orphan work determined
      • A reasonable search for the author is done and none is found
      Risks of using a work prior to determining that it is indeed an orphan work.
      • The owner of the work may return and enforce his or her right making the violators legally liable.
      Why all works can’t be digitized.
    • The Public Domain and Orphan Works Cont.
      What libraries are doing about orphan works
      • Libraries are performing a thorough search for the owner of any works they are planning to post on their site prior to posting it.
      • Once the search is completed and the results are that the owner was not found they make a calculated risk and post it on their site.
      • They post that the material is not to be used for any reason due the lack of an express license.
      Why all works can’t be digitized.
    • Content on the Web
      Using materials from the Internet
      • Copyright notice no longer required
      • All works are protected whether digital or not
      • Assume everything is a published printed work
      Why everything on the web isn’t public domain
    • Content on the Web Cont.
      Implied License
      • When an other posts something on the web without stating specifically what a reader may do with the material.
      • A reader is expected to read, print it out, forward it, and even use it as a basis for another work
      • The problem with an implied license is that the reader is risking legal action due to the vagueness of the license.
      Why everything on the web isn’t public domain
    • Content on the Web Cont.
      Express License
      • Very specific as to the use of the posted document
      • By adding a Creative Common License the author states what the reader, listener or viewer may do with the work.
      • Allows material to be part of the flow of creativity.
      Why everything on the web isn’t public domain
    • Content on the Web Cont.
      Liability for posting infringing work
      • Individuals have been sued for copying and distributing copyrighted works without permission.
      • Universities are liable if students use their network to post possible copyrighted works on campus sites.
      • Employees of Colleges and Universities can inadvertently put the campus in legal problems if they post copyrighted work without permission.
      Why everything on the web isn’t public domain
    • Content on the Web Cont.
      Fair Use
      • Simply stating that you are using the material for educational purposes is no longer good enough.
      • You may be risking you founding if you use copyrighted material on the basis of a readers implied rights.
      • Always try to use materials that are accompanied by an express license.
      Why everything on the web isn’t public domain
    • Fair Use
      • Subscription licenses - are typically obtained by libraries
      • Transactional licenses - done on a (case by case) basis are also available through the Copyright Clearance Center.
      • The Creative Commons License - can also be provided by the owner of the work
      • The Implied license - is available to the reader but is considered riskier that the previous ones due to its vagueness.
      The licenses that are available to the public
    • Fair Use Cont.
      The use of any material without the written consent of the owner carries a large financial penalty
      • $150,000.00 dollars can be awarded to the owner of the work for each individual act of willful infringement, meaning that the person knew he or she was committing copyright infringement and did it anyway.
      The licenses that are available to the public
    • The TEACH Act
      After the Teaching Education and Harmonization (TEACH) Act became law in 2002 teachers teaching distance education classes must teach under certain limitations.
      • When making clips of movies found on DVDs in must be made to an analog recording device only.
      • Ensure that any digital clip that is made available to the distance education students is kept in a digital format with technological protection.
      The impact copyright laws have had on distance education
    • The TEACH Act Cont.
      TEACH requirements for coverage:
      • None-profit educational institution
      • The use of material is limited to the specific number of students in the specific class
      • The use of material must be for live or asynchronous presentations.
      • The transmission of materials typically purchase by students is prohibited.
      • Notify students that class content is covered
      under copyright .
      • Implement technological measure to
      ensure compliance with copyright policies.
      The impact copyright laws have had on distance education
    • Getting Permission
      There are several places online that you may seek depending on your needs.
      • Copyright Clearance Center : If the work is part of a book or magazine article.
      • Very Extensive Rights Data Information (VERDI): If work is a multimedia production.
      • Copyright Licensing Agency: If work is a digital version of an existing print work.
      Where you would go to get the permission you need
    • Getting Permission Cont.
      If what you need are collections of images specifically for educators you may access some of the following:
      • Academic Image Cooperative
      • American Society of Media Photographers
      • Artists Rights Society
      • Aurora Picture Network International
      • Media Image Resource Alliance
      • Visual Arts and Gallery Association
      Where you would go to get the permission you need
    • Getting Permission Cont.
      Some misconceptions about using music in and educational setting do excite and there is an easy way to narrow it down.
      • Most colleges and universities do pay a fee for use music but only for a very limited use.
      • The universities are never covered for “Grand Rights” under their limited license.
      • They are not allowed to play music in a dramatic setting like a play or dance without obtaining permission first.
      Where you would go to get the permission you need
    • Together we can ensure that our students complete the necessary work without placing themselves in a legal predicament..
    • Sources
      Harper, Georgia K. "Confu." Copyright Crash Course. University of Texas Libraries, 2007. Web. 04 Sept. 2011. <http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/pdandorphan.html>.
      Harper, Georgia K. "Obtaining Rights to Produce a Play or Musical." Copyright Crash Course. University of Texas Libraries, 2007. Web. 04 Sept. 2011. <http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/perform.html>.
      Harper, Georgia K. "Fair Use of Copyrighted Materials." Copyright Crash Course. University of Texas Libraries, 2007. Web. 04 Sept. 2011. <http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/copypol2.html>.
      Harper, Georgia K. "The TEACH Act." Copyright Crash Course. University of Texas Libraries, 2007. Web. 04 Sept. 2011. <http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/teachact.html>.
      Harper, Georgia K. "Getting Permission." Copyright Crash Course. University of Texas Libraries, 2007. Web. 04 Sept. 2011. <http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/permissn.html>.
      Sources used to develop this presentation