2.a.madden
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

2.a.madden

on

  • 88 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
88
Views on SlideShare
88
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

2.a.madden 2.a.madden Presentation Transcript

  • Jaclyn Madden & Wendy Rappazzo Harford Community College AFACCT ’14 Conference, Prince George’s Community College Sessions 2A and 6A Poster Sessions January 9-10, 2014 Contact: jmadden@harford.edu or wrappazzo@harford.edu
  • Abstract • The abilities to analyze and understand primary scientific literature and apply the scientific method are critical to the fields of healthcare and science. We describe a scientific journal assignment for introductory level biology students. The primary objective of the assignment is to develop students’ abilities to evaluate scientific literature and to critically analyze the results of a peer-reviewed, scientific journal article. The secondary objective is to apply the scientific method to research presented in the article. To meet these objectives, students complete the assignment in four draft sections, receive feedback from the instructors critiquing their writing and providing guidance on analysis of the journal article, and then submit a revised final version of the journal. Analysis of data showed statistically significant improvement in student performance when drafts were used compared to when the assignment is completed without drafts. In addition, evaluation of students’ abilities to identify and analyze the components of the scientific method in the drafts compared to the final version of the assignment indicated a statistically significant improvement in the final version. This draft approach can be utilized in science and non-science courses to improve students’ abilities to critically analyze primary literature.
  • Background • Assignment developed for new course in Spring 2012 – BIO 119: Biology for Allied Health Professionals – 4 credit lab science course (GL) • Course designed as prerequisite for Anatomy & Physiology • Assignment modified in subsequent semesters to improve assessment methods and student learning outcomes
  • Assignment Objectives • Primary: To develop the abilities to evaluate scientific literature and to understand and critically analyze the results of a scientific journal article • Secondary: To apply the scientific method to a peer-reviewed journal article and demonstrate competency in identifying and analyzing components of the scientific method – STEM Division Goal
  • Version 1 (Spring 2012) • Students completed two written critical reviews of scientific journal articles which included analysis of the application of the scientific method by researchers • Slight improvement in averages between assignment 1 and 2 (75.40% vs. 79.57%) – Students expressed difficulty understanding and analyzing a scientific journal – Students lacked experience writing scientific papers
  • Versions 2/3 (Summer 2012 through Fall 2013) • Revised assignment – single journal review completed in four draft sections and one final version – Feedback from instructors provided on each draft section – Drafts revised and submitted as final version • Student grades on assignment improved via use of drafts – See Figure 1 • Version 3 (implemented Summer 2013) clarified instructions and grading rubric – Revised summary and interpretation of results sections – Added “Explanation to a Patient” to section 3 to evaluate students’ comprehension of material – Addition of secondary objective
  • Summary of Assignment • Draft Section 1: Definitions and Observations – Define terms and concepts, describe observations/previous studies, identify question • Draft Section 2: Hypothesis and Experimental Design – See additional description on right • Draft Section 3: Summary and Interpretation of Results – Summarize results, explain results using data from figure from journal article, analyze validity of hypothesis • Draft Section 4: Discussion – Discuss validity and future implications of research with use of additional sources to support ideas
  • Secondary Objective • Implemented Summer 2013 • Use of draft section 2 (Hypothesis and Experimental Design) and final version to assess students’ comprehension of components of the scientific method – Evaluated ability to identify and explain hypothesis, independent variable, dependent variable, constant (controlled) variables, and control and experimental groups • See Figure 2
  • Section 2: Hypothesis and Experimental Design – Student Instructions • Hypothesis: State the hypothesis provided by the authors of the article. Make sure that you identify the statement as the hypothesis (i.e., “The hypothesis is…”). The hypothesis should be written in your own words. It should be specific and written in the proper format. • Experiment: Describe the experiment as it is outlined in the journal article. The following components must be included: • Independent variable: State the independent variable. • Dependent variable: State the dependent variable. • Controlled (constant) variables: List the controlled variables used by the authors during the experiment. • Control and experimental groups: Identify the control and experimental groups. • Description of experiment and data collection: Describe the steps of the experiment. Include a description of how data and results were collected.
  • Section 2: Hypothesis and Experimental Design – Rubric 3 Points Not applicable. 2 Points Not applicable. 1 Points The hypothesis is stated in the correct format. Independen t Variable Not applicable. Not applicable. The independent variable is described. Dependent Variable Not applicable. Not applicable. The dependent variable is stated. Controlled (Constant) Variables Not applicable. Not applicable. Controlled variables are stated. Control and Experiment al Groups Not applicable. Not applicable. The paper thoroughly describes the steps of the experiment. It describes how the control and experimental groups were treated. Experiment: Not applicable. Data Collection The description of the steps of the experiment and how the control and experimental groups were treated is incomplete. The paper identifies the control and experimental groups. The paper fails to describe either the steps of the experiment OR how control and experimental groups were treated. Hypothesis Description of Experiment Not applicable. The paper describes how data was collected. 0 Points The hypothesis is missing or is not stated in the correct format. The independent variable is missing or is incorrect. The dependent variable is missing or is incorrect. Controlled variables are missing, incorrect, or incomplete. The paper does not identify the control and experimental groups. Description of experiment and how control and experimental groups were treated is missing. The paper does not describe how data was collected. Points Earned
  • Sample Articles • Efficacy and safety of an extended nevirapine regimen in infant children of breastfeeding mothers with HIV-1 infection for prevention of postnatal HIV-1 transmission (HPTN 046): a randomized, double-blind, placebocontrolled trial. The Lancet • Comparative efficacy of inactivated and live attenuated influenza vaccines. The New England Journal of Medicine. • The effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on the inflammatory response to eccentric strength exercise. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. • Bioactives in blueberries improve insulin sensitivity in obese, insulin-resistant men and women. The Journal of Nutrition.