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Learning for Life and Critical Thinking in the Web 3.0 Era Keynote Address

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As the sixth Director of the Kellogg Institute of the National Center for Developmental Education of Appalachian State University, Wes Anthony is also the first since Dr. Hunter Boylan to be a member of the Kellogg Institute faculty. Mr. Anthony is the author of two novels, over 50 professional presentations, and has engaged in scholarly publishing throughout his career, and most recently co-authored, along with Hunter Boylan and Patti Levine Brown, “The Perfect Storm of Policy Issues and Their Impact on Developmental Education” (NADE Digest, 2017).

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Learning for Life and Critical Thinking in the Web 3.0 Era Keynote Address

  1. 1. PRESENTED FOR THE ASSOCIATION OF FACULTIES FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COMMUNITY COLLEGE TEACHING JANUARY 11, 2019 B Y : W E S A N T H O N Y D I R E C T O R K E L L O G G I N S T I T U T E Learning For Life and Critical Thinking in the 3.0 Era
  2. 2. Facts About Postsecondary Education  The cost of a community college degree increased by 61% since 1996.  The number of associate degrees produced fell short of labor market needs by 3,000,000 in 2018.  Two-Year Community college completion rates are about 28%.  Student debt reached 1 trillion dollars in 2015.
  3. 3. Legislators and Policy Makers Want to…  Reduce the costs of college,  Generate more associate degrees and certificates,  Accelerate college completion rates, and  Reduce student debt.
  4. 4. Facts About Remediation  60% of community college students place in one or more remedial courses.  A student placed in the lowest level of remedial math has only a 16% chance of ever taking a college level math course.  Only 22.3% of those enrolled in remedial courses complete a college level course in that subject within 2 years.
  5. 5. Unfortunately…  Legislators and policy makers have been informed by various vested interest groups that remediation is the primary cause of: Increased costs of college, Increased time to graduation, and Increased student debt.
  6. 6. And then…..
  7. 7. Remedial Courses are the “Low Hanging Fruit”  It’s easy for policy makers to find fault with remediation – some of the criticism is deserved… some of it is unreasonable.  It’s easy for policy makers to implement policies to redesign/eliminate/reform remediation.  It’s easy for them to tell their constituents that they have now solved the problem.
  8. 8. What places college students most at risk?  Being an ethnic minority.  Coming from a low-income background.  Being a first generation college student.  Having a history of poor academic performance.
  9. 9. And who are we working with?  More than 50% of the minority students in higher education are attending community colleges,  58% of community college students are receiving some form of financial aid,  36% are first generation students,  72% of 2014 high school graduates were NOT “college ready” in all four subject areas.  62% of community college students are enrolled part time.
  10. 10. They Are All Our Students Retrieved from https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1094&bih=475&ei=PvI3XO- 8EMrX5gKAiqTIAQ&q=student+diversity&oq=student+diversity&gs_l=img.3..0l6j0i5i30l3j0i24.110.2677..4050...0.0..0.510.3403.0j8j4j1j1j1......0....1..gws-wiz-img.......0i8i30.2zHJCGhXJdQ
  11. 11. How are Institutions, Systems, and States Responding  Exempting as many as possible from remediation.  Embedding remediation in gateway courses.  Integrating English and reading.  Adopting modularized mathematics.  Integrating academic support services.
  12. 12. What I’ve Heard About the Outcomes of These Responses They all work to some degree if you… Allocate sufficient resources, Make expectations clear, Use formative evaluation for revision, and Train faculty and staff well.
  13. 13. What I’ve Heard About the Outcomes of These Responses  Exempting students from remediation increases pass rates in gateway courses.  Exempting students from remediation increases failure rates in gateway courses.  Students who fail gateway courses now have failing grades in credit bearing courses.  Students who pass gateway courses may still fail follow up courses.
  14. 14. What Do We Do Now?  Recognize who we’re working with and act accordingly.  Study how diverse adults learn.  Collect data to validate or invalidate what we’re doing.  Advocate for developmental education on your campuses and with system officers.
  15. 15. What Do We Do Now?  Read and apply research to what you do.  Get more credentials.  Keep up with developments in the field.  Do what you do best within the context of your campus system.
  16. 16. Development Vs. Remediation  Developmental education is the integration of courses and support services guided by the principles of adult learning and development.  Remedial education is the provision of stand- alone courses re-teaching pre-college material without connecting to support services.
  17. 17. What do we know about underprepared students?  Only 7% of the children from families at bottom 20% of wage earners attain a B.A. by age 26.  Only 27% of first generation college students attain a B.A. within five years.
  18. 18. Facts About Remediation  The top third of those placed in remedial courses do not benefit from them.  The middle third of those placed in remedial courses might or might not benefit from them.  The bottom third of those placed in remedial courses benefit from them.
  19. 19. Where we are now.  There is plenty of fault to go around but that’s no longer the issue.  What we have now is what we have to work with.  Meanwhile, legislators have established new agendas and expect us to implement them.
  20. 20. What Places College Students at Risk?  Being an ethnic minority.  Coming from a low-income background.  Being a first generation college student.  Having a history of poor academic performance.
  21. 21. And who are we working with?  More than 50% of the minority students in higher education are attending community colleges,  58% of community college students are receiving some form of financial aid,  36% are first generation students,  72% of 2014 high school graduates were NOT “college ready” in all four subject areas.  62% of community college students are enrolled part time.
  22. 22. Current Innovations  Co-Requisite Courses  IRW  Mastery Learning  Accelerated Learning  Advent of Technology
  23. 23. Promising Practices Co-requisites should be registered before or after a gateway course. At smaller schools, there may be more than one gateway section that flows into a single co-requisite section held at a strategic time. Colleges may schedule the same instructor to teach both the parent course and the co-requisite (Best Practice). Another option is to have a curriculum instructor to instruct the parent section while a Dev. Ed. Professional teaches the co- requisite.
  24. 24. Wes Anthony: anthonysw@appstate.edu www.ncde.appstate.edu 828-262-2805

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