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  • Adele is a three-year-old child. She was shaken by her baby sitter because her crying made her babysitter angry. As a result, she got shaken baby syndrome. Now, she is a girl with acquired brain injury. She has difficulty with gross and fine motor skills and shows some speech and cognitive delays. Adele’s mother went into rehab for alcohol and drug abuse, she couldn’t take care of Adele for a time. Now, Adele’s mother is clean and sober, she is able to take care of Adele. In order to have a fresh start, Adele’s mother and Adele moved to the Toronto area. Adele’s mother is a full time student at Centennial College now. They need some services in the Toronto area.
  • three-year-old girl with acquired brain injury An acquired brain injury (ABI) is brain damage caused by events after birth, rather than as part of a genetic or congenital disorder such as fetal alcohol syndrome, perinatal illness or perinatal hypoxia. ABI can result in cognitive, physical, emotional, or behavioral impairments that lead to permanent or temporary changes in functioning. Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acquired_brain_injury Resulting in shaken baby syndrome Shaken baby syndrome (SBS) is a triad of medical symptoms: subdural hematoma, retinal hemorrhage, and brain swelling from which doctors, consistent with current medical understanding, infer child abuse caused by intentional shaking. In a majority of cases there is no visible sign of external trauma.SBS is often fatal and can cause severe brain damage, resulting in lifelong disability.Prevention is similar to the prevention of child abuse in general.Treatment involves monitoring of intracranial pressure (the pressure within the skull), draining of fluid from the cerebral ventricles, and, if an intracranial hematoma is present, draining of the hematoma.Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaken_baby_syndromeHas difficulty with gross and fine motor skillsGross motor skills encompass the abilities required to control the large muscles of the body for walking, running, sitting, crawling, and other activities.Fine motor skill abilities required to control the smaller muscles of the body for writing, playing an instrument, artistic expression and craft work. The muscles required to perform fine motor skills are generally found in the hands, feet and headReference: http://www.enotes.com/gross-motor-skills-reference/gross-motor-skills-172030 Children with fine-motor delays have difficulty using their small muscles, so that tasks like grasping crayons with their fingers are tricky. When it comes to gross-motor delays, the trouble is instead with large muscles and mastering skills like walking, kicking, hopping, and climbing stairs. some signs of fine-motor delays and gross-motor delays being late to reach physical milestones, like rolling over and sitting up no signs of walking by 18 months stiff limbs or low muscle tone (she can’t hold much weight) consistently walking on tiptoe being unable to use one side of the body as easily as the other (only kicking with the left foot, for example) having trouble holding and using objects — managing a cup, for example, or scribbling with a crayon being clumsy and falling frequently drooling beyond 18 months of age having trouble chewing and swallowing Reference: http://www.whattoexpect.com/developmental-delays-in-children/fine-motor-delays-and-gross-motor-delays-in-toddlers.aspxShow some speech and cognitive delaysSpeech delay, also known as alalia, refers to a delay in the development or use of the mechanisms that produce speech. Speech, as distinct from language, refers to the actual process of making sounds, using such organs and structures as the lungs, vocal cords, mouth, tongue, teeth, etc. Language delay refers to a delay in the development or use of the knowledge of language.Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speech_delayCognitive delay usually refers to a developmental lag. That means that an individual's cognitive abilities do not match the expectations of their chronological age. It is a term most often used in describing children. However, it is also possible that the delays become permanent - then they are probably better thought of as an impairment or disability, although the term delay sometimes still gets used.
  • Environment setting provide activities that can involve families I plan to provide activities that can involve families because of the separation of Adele and her mother. Adele may feel strange of her mother because of the separation. I would like to provide chances for them to become more closer. Examples of providing activities that can involve families circle time with families play games with parents parents volunteer for outside play provide more materials for children to exploreChildren are learning when they are playing and exploring. Because of Adele is a girl with acquired brain injury, she has difficulty with gross and fine motor skills and shows some speech and cognitive delays, she need more materials for stimulation. For example:materials for gross and fine motor skills development providewater table, blocks center, puzzle area for indoor environment to develop fine motor skills provide bikes and some physical activities for outdoor playing to develop gross motor skills vocal materialsset up an environment to encourage children communicate witheach otherChildren who have disabilities are always quiet in the classroom. I would like to set up the environment to encourage children to play together and have more communication. For example, put some pictures about talking with others on the wall and provide some activities that children can do together.
  • Teaching strategies Build children’s confidence Children with disabilities have low self-esteem and low confidence. In order to build their confidence, I would give them more chances to make decision by themselves and ask them for help. In this way, they can feel they are valued and needed. Encourage independent To encourage children independent is very important for their development. Adele should become less reliant on adult and gain greater independence in all aspects of their lives. Encourage exploring Children are learning while they are playing. I would give Adele some hints to encourage her keep exploring the environment. Encourage peers helping In order to develop Adele’s social skills, I would encourage children help her to solve problem. At the same time, I would encourage Adele to ask other children's help when she need.
  • Toronto ABI Network 520 Sutherland Drive Toronto, Ontario M4G 3V9 Tel: 416-597-3057 Fax: 416-597-7021 MissionTo provide leadership in furthering equitable, accessible, responsive, cost-effective and quality publicly-funded services and support for persons living with the effects of an acquired brain injury in the Greater Toronto AreaVisionInfluencing excellence in publicly-funded services and support for persons living with the effects of an acquired brain injuryQuality of lifeDefined by the person and his/her family Social responsibilityEqual access and timely service Responsiveness to individuals and their familiesFeedback from persons and their families is essential Knowledge-based services and supportRecommendations regarding services and support will be supported by data PartnershipsCollaboration with all stakeholders is crucial ResearchResearch and evaluation of clinical outcomes are fundamental EducationEducation of all stakeholders is critical to influence excellence in service and supportThe values as stated are not intended to be exclusive or all-encompassing but to serve as the principles guiding the activities of the Network.Strategic DirectionsSystem Based Planning and Advocacy ABI Education and Support for Evidence-Based Practice System Coordination and Access Client Data Tracking and Reporting The strategic directions are not listed in any order of priority. The activities related to each strategic direction are important and will be pursued in the course of the next year, but at any given time there might be more focus in one area than another. Established Priorities for 2011/2012:The priorities which form the basis for the Network's 2011/2012 Operating Plan include: To maintain a continued focus on system coordination and access through initiatives that support improved patient access and flow from acute care to inpatient ABI rehabilitation. A focus on facilitating collaboration amongst ABI and mental health stakeholders to enhance service capacity and access for individuals with ABI across both sectors. Committees & Working GroupsStanding Committees:Advisory Committee Executive Committee Task Groups, 2011/2012: Referral and Patient Transitions Task Group ABI ONF ACT Demonstration Project Brain Injury Family Intervention Education Task Group Conference Planning Task Group Data Advisory Group
  • Reference: Wikipediahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wikiToronto ABI Network http://www.abinetwork.ca/home.htm emotes.(n.d.). Gross motor skills . Retire march 18, 2012, from: http://www.enotes.com/gross-motor-skills-reference/gross-motor-skills-172030 what to expect.(n.d.).Top Questions About Fine-Motor Delays and Gross-Motor Delays . Retire march 18, 2012, from: http://www.whattoexpect.com/developmental-delays-in-children/fine-motor-delays-and-gross-motor-delays-in-toddlers.aspx
  • Self-evaluation: This is a very meaningful and useful assignment for me. According to this assignment, I realize more details about the children with acquired brain injury and how to help them and their family. At the same time, I found information about agency in the Toronto area, that make me feel I can really do something possible for the children with acquired brain injury. There are three things goes well when I was doing the assignment. The first thing is I have good time management to do the assignment step by step, so that I have enough time to do the assignment and improve it. The second thing is I use the internet widely. I realized more information about children with acquired brain injury and the results of shaking baby on the internet. At the same time, I found some agencies to help children and their families too. Third, I did the assignment related to what I learned in class and the handouts I got from class. There is challenge when I was doing the assignment. It is difficult to find agency in the Toronto area, most of them are in Canada and global. In order to find a suitable agency, I type the keyword more detail and search more pages.
  • meeting

    1. 1. Meeting the needs of children and families Student name: Yingquan Liang (Aegean) Student number: 300564966
    2. 2. Introduce the child and the family Adele • three-year-old girl with acquired brain injury • was shaken by her baby sitter • has difficulty with gross and fine motor skills • shows some speech and cognitive delays Adele’s mother  In the past: • went into rehab for alcohol and drug abuse • couldn’t take care of Adele for a time  Nowadays: • she is clean and sober now • able to take care of Adele now • a full time student at Centennial College Adele’s family • have a fresh start in the Toronto area
    3. 3. Introduce Adele  three-year-old girl with acquired brain injury • caused by events after birth • result in cognitive, physical, emotional, or behavioral impairments  resulting in Shaken Baby Syndrome • a triad of medical symptoms • cause severe brain damage • resulting in lifelong disability  has difficulty with gross and fine motor skills • gross motor skill---ability to control the large muscles • fine motor skill--- ability to control the smaller muscles  shows some speech and cognitive delays • speech delays---a delay in the development or use of the mechanisms that produce speech • cognitive delays---refers to a developmental lag
    4. 4. The ways I would meet some of the needs within mychild care setting Environment setting • provide activities that can involve families • provide more materials for children to explore materials for gross and fine motor skills development vocal materials • set up an environment to encourage children communicate with each other
    5. 5. The ways I would meet some of the needs within mychild care setting Teaching strategies • Build children’s confidence • Encourage independent • Encourage exploring • Encourage peers helping
    6. 6. Agencies in the Toronto area Toronto ABI Network 520 Sutherland Drive Toronto, Ontario M4G 3V9 Tel: 416-597-3057 Fax: 416-597-7021 The link to the website: http://www.abinetwork.ca/home.htm
    7. 7. Thanks for listening!

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