• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
MEDA Keynote - Broadband - 20110606 - Tom Loveland
 

MEDA Keynote - Broadband - 20110606 - Tom Loveland

on

  • 219 views

Keynote about broadband and economic development, delivered to Maryland Economic Development Association 50th Annual conference, June 6, 2011, by Tom Loveland, CEO of Mind Over Machines.

Keynote about broadband and economic development, delivered to Maryland Economic Development Association 50th Annual conference, June 6, 2011, by Tom Loveland, CEO of Mind Over Machines.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
219
Views on SlideShare
219
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Why am I standing here?
  • Who ARE you guys?!
  • April 2009 - Congress directed FCC to develop plan
  • Two years ago, Congress asked the FCC to prepare a National Broadband Plan. Google offered input, and considered suggesting that the Federal government should help wire some communities.
  • When Sergey Brin heard that part, he said, Why don’t we do that? And Google got to work.
  • The very next day, Google announced Fiber for Communities, a program to install ULTRA high speed fiber in one or more lucky towns.
  • And the nation reacted. Mayors jumped into shark tanks and frozen lakes.
  • Fans marched in formation
  • And everybody got into the game. In Baltimore, Google Fiber was the talk of the town for weeks. Everybody imagined what life could be like with ultra high speed fiber. And we came up with a lot of neat ideas:
  • Imagine the Space Telescope Science Institute collaborating with the Maryland Science Center, astounding and educating our children with an immersive, interactive, 3-dimensional model of the Universe.
  • We already have serious gaming in town, used for military, emergency room, and homeland security simulations. Imagine how much more realistic and effective these could be with ultra high speed fiber.
  • Imagine our medical experts viewing streaming three-dimensional images from afar to diagnose patients and educate health practitioners around the world.
  • Imagine them performing cutting-edge surgery on those same patients.
  • Baltimore, by rights, should be the Health IT Capital of the World. We have major research institutions. TWO biotech parks. And major federal health agencies. They house some of the most expansive medical data sets in the world.
  • Imagine if we connected these data sets with ultra high speed broadband. You’d be like Tom Cruise in Minority Report, but 3-dimensional and immersive. Relationships appear. You identify new connections at a glance.
  • And if most of us had ultra high speed broadband, we could leave our PCs attached and operate as a citywide supercomputer during off-hours.
  • Not just consumers , but producers of information
  • John Horrigan, FCC Mayor Graham Richard Mayor Joey Durel
  • KENNEDY KRIEGER EXAMPLE Imagine doctors simply serving patients here in town. It’s important that some young Kennedy Krieger patients be seen frequently, multiple times per week, so the doctor can interact with them and adjust treatment for vastly superior outcomes. But it’s tough for many of these patients to get to the doctor’s office even ONCE a week. Once every TWO weeks can be hard. So Kennedy Krieger wants to send a PC/camera home with them. But the patients don’t have broadband, so it won’t work.
  • Like PixelMagic, that brought 100 jobs to Lafayette, LA, after it deployed high speed fiber. Nucomm, of Canada, opened call center in Lafayette in 2006, becauseof broadband, workforce. Attracted to an underutilized shopping center. By 2008 employed 560. Now targeting 1000.
  • Maybe it’s in Ten Sleep, Wyoming, where the local government has invested in ultra-fast broadband as an economic development strategy. Eleutian’s mission is to teach the world English, using online courses and US-based teachers. Broadband means that residents of Ten Sleep and other wired Wyoming towns can make 15 bucks an hour from home, teaching Asian students who pay $150 per semester instead of the $50 per hour they would normally shell out for private English lessons. In a time when much of the US is in recession, Eleutian has been hiring certified teachers to satisfy the global demand for learning English. “ in-sourced”
  • That’s the home of Eleutian Technology, a company that uses Skype video conferencing to teach English to students in East Asia. Despite having its headquarters between the saloon and the public library in a town of 350 people, Eleutian is tapping a $100 billion market and has over 15,000 customers all over South Korea, China, and Japan.
  • “ These jobs aren’t traditional teaching jobs. Eleutian employees have great flexibility with their hours and their schedules. It’s a great alternative for teachers who are interested in working outside the traditional setting,” Business Infrastructure Spearfish owns and manages a fully developed professional business/industrial park served by a state-of-the art fiber optic telecommunications network.
  • In 2005, Cooper Industries, a Fortune 200 company whose global data operations were located in Auburn, IN, was at a crossroads – it had to either expand its Auburn facility or close the facility and relocate. The company’s most critical requirement was for fast, resilient and reliable broadband. Auburn worked with Cooper to craft a business-class broadband service and thereby preserve $7 million in annual payroll for the community.
  • South Korea continues to be the world leader in connectivity, with 100% broadband penetration and broadband quality rankings that rise annually. With its broadband superiority, South Korea also tops the report's list of Innovation-driven economies. Paper asserts: "broadband leadership is strongly associated with competitiveness, knowledge economy and innovation.“ 72 countries and 239 cities U.S. shares #15 with Latvia, France, and Canada (pairing download and upload throughput, and latency capabilities of the connection) http://www.speedmatters.org/blog/archive/united-states-finishes-15th-in-global-broadband-ranking/
  • The “broadband market” in much of the U.S. happily provides slower connections at higher prices when compared to many of our peer nations. Cable and telephone companies see little reason to upgrade these networks—the low population density does not lend itself to quickly recovering investments.
  • Smaller communities, literally left in the dark, for electric utilities of their own. By 1890, 150+ towns operating power and light systems. Number grew rapidly. Typically charged half of private utilities, common people gained access to miracle of lights, while in other cities only the wealthy could afford to switch from gas or kerosene lamps, and commercial businesses faced higher prices.
  • Lafayette begged its incumbents to beef up local broadband networks and was rebuffed. This Cajun country community decided to build its own next-generation network. The incumbents argued that the households and businesses of Lafayette had all the broadband they needed and sued to stop the city. $1M and couple years. Santa Monica: Instead of paying for bandwidth, City leased fiber network from cable TV company, then used savings to finance its own fiber network, which it leased to private companies at market rates, reduced over time. Revenues cover costs and support 27 free Wi-Fi hot spots and capital improvements. Affordable broadband offsets high rents. Movie directors use Santa Monica’s Fairmont Hotel to view dailies and send via broadband instead of sending couriers with hard drives to studios, and private jets to post-production facilities.
  • Map out-of-date: North Carolina just outlawed municipal broadband networks http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2010/01/municipal-fiber-needs-more-fdr-localism-fewer-state-bans.ars
  • Howard County’s information technology team brought together 10 jurisdictions in central Maryland, and collaborated with the Maryland Broadband Cooperative, for this amazing achievement. When finished, the Inter-County Broadband Network will connect hundreds of public schools, libraries, public safety agencies, community colleges, and other government institutions. That means the technology will be in place for better emergency management, enhanced education and improved health care. And all that adds up to a better business climate in Maryland.   Maryland’s workforce will be better connected, better trained and more nimble. And the state will become an even more attractive place to do business.
  • 10 times FASTER than Google Fiber! 1,006 institutions like schools, fire stations, and hospitals around the state. It is the only grant of its kind in the country! But One Maryland Broadband is NOT Google Fiber. It’s NOT coming to your home or office anytime soon.
  • Can attract people now, instead of companies. Since workers will be able to work from anywhere, instead of attracting companies, you need to attract the workers. Build communities that people want to live in.

MEDA Keynote - Broadband - 20110606 - Tom Loveland MEDA Keynote - Broadband - 20110606 - Tom Loveland Presentation Transcript

  • Business at the Speed of Light Tom Loveland, CEO
    • WHO AM I?
    • HIGH-SPEED BROADBAND: SO WHAT?
    • IT’S NOT EASY
    • MARYLAND’S INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY
  • WHO AM I?
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • “ A real political force.... I’ve never seen anybody go from 0 to 60 so quickly.” − House Majority Leader Kumar Barve
  •  
      • To ensure every American has “access to broadband capability.”
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • WHAT BALTIMORE TOLD GOOGLE
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • Health IT Capital of the World
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • We Don’t Just Consume, We Create
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • Odds 3:1100
  • HOPING GOOGLE PICKS YOUR CITY IS NOT A STRATEGY
  •  
  •  
  • BROADBAND TASK FORCE
    • What do we have?
    • How can we leverage it?
    • What are best practices?
  •  
  • HIGH-SPEED BROADBAND: SO WHAT?
  •  
  •  
  • Miami-based HomeServe USA, the nation's leading provider of emergency home repair programs, announced today it has grown its staff to 140 employees at the call center it opened last November in East Brainerd. " We decided on Chattanooga because of the availability of high-quality employees combined with the robust telecommunications and data infrastructure available in the area." Published March 28th, 2011 HomeServe staff up to 140 employees
  •  
  •  
  • Eleutian Technology Opens Spearfish Teaching Center May 25, 2011 // PIERRE, S.D. – Eleutian Technology officially opened its new Spearfish facility today with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.   The company plans to hire 50 people in the Spearfish area to teach conversational English skills to students in Asian countries via state-of-the-art video teaching technology. 
  • Saved $7M annual payroll
  • (SPEED DEMONSTRATION)
  •  
  • “ Today’s broadband will be tomorrow’s traffic jam, and the need for speed will persist as new applications and services gobble up existing bandwidth.” -- U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Understanding Broadband Demand, 2002
  • IT’S NOT EASY
  • U.S. 15 th Oct 2010
  • Percentage of Homes with Fiber Ultra-fast Broadband by State
  •  
  •  
  • History of Electric Power Industry
    • 1880’s: Lighting – large cities, commercial establishments, homes of very wealthy
    • 1888+: Urban trolley systems
    • 1900+: Industrial sector
    • 1910: Homes of common people in cities
    • 1930’s: Farmers and rural
  • Just Do It
    • Ft. Wayne, Indiana (Verizon)
    • Lafayette, Louisiana (muni)
    • Chattanooga, Tennessee (muni, 1G)
    • Santa Monica, CA (private --> public)
  •  
  • MARYLAND’S INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY
  • Maryland lands $115M stimulus grant to extend broadband network Friday, September 17, 2010
  • One Maryland Broadband
    • 10 Gbps
    • 1,006 anchor institutions
    • Connects every county
    • Complete: August 31, 2013
  • Opportunities
    • Shared Services, e.g., PeopleSoft
      • Municipalities
      • Businesses
    • Application Store
    • Health IT
    • Brainstorm for more…
  • Extending One Maryland
    • Jurisdictions own their portion of the network
    • Extra strands
    • Public-Private Partnerships
    • Municipal bonds
    • Contract guarantees
    • University systems
    • what else?
  •  
  • Be a Broadband Ambassador!