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Et2010 pt2funstuff

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Wrapping up Engaging New Technologies 2010 with some whimsy

Wrapping up Engaging New Technologies 2010 with some whimsy

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  • ExcelArt Freeware brightens up your Excel spreadsheets by importing your image files to create little works of art. Convert Bitmaps, Jpegs, GIFs and PNG images into colourful mosaics in minutes or even seconds.
  • ExcelArt Freeware brightens up your Excel spreadsheets by importing your image files to create little works of art. Convert Bitmaps, Jpegs, GIFs and PNG images into colourful mosaics in minutes or even seconds.
  • sketch-recognition for tablet computers such as Apple's iPad that can interpret stylus drawings of chemical bonds and element symbols for chemists, circuit components such as batteries or capacitors in an electrical engineering diagram, and even family trees. Tablet computers and smart phones already have software that can recognize handwriting based on http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/sketch-tablet-0219.html language patterns and the relatively limited strokes for each letter. But creating better sketch-recognition software required MIT to combine information about the physical appearance of a final sketch with information about how it was drawn -- the system can recall which way a stylus was moving when it made any given stroke. The MIT software then breaks down the drawn symbol into different parts such as horizontal, vertical or diagonal elements. Algorithms help clean up stray marks and enhance intentional strokes. And a database allows the system to compare drawn symbols to known symbols. http://srlweb.cs.tamu.edu/srlng/research/paper/39?download=1&from=/srlng/research/project/4
  • You grab a tablet computer, a smart whiteboard , or another device which allows for stylus-based input and draw out a molecule, a compound, or a circuit design. Then you ask your computer whether such an object exists anywhere in a database or on the Internet and if so, to identify it.
  • You grab a tablet computer, a smart whiteboard , or another device which allows for stylus-based input and draw out a molecule, a compound, or a circuit design. Then you ask your computer whether such an object exists anywhere in a database or on the Internet and if so, to identify it.
  • You grab a tablet computer, a smart whiteboard , or another device which allows for stylus-based input and draw out a molecule, a compound, or a circuit design. Then you ask your computer whether such an object exists anywhere in a database or on the Internet and if so, to identify it.
  • sketch-recognition for tablet computers such as Apple's iPad that can interpret stylus drawings of chemical bonds and element symbols for chemists, circuit components such as batteries or capacitors in an electrical engineering diagram, and even family trees. Tablet computers and smart phones already have software that can recognize handwriting based on http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/sketch-tablet-0219.html language patterns and the relatively limited strokes for each letter. But creating better sketch-recognition software required MIT to combine information about the physical appearance of a final sketch with information about how it was drawn -- the system can recall which way a stylus was moving when it made any given stroke. The MIT software then breaks down the drawn symbol into different parts such as horizontal, vertical or diagonal elements. Algorithms help clean up stray marks and enhance intentional strokes. And a database allows the system to compare drawn symbols to known symbols. http://srlweb.cs.tamu.edu/srlng/research/paper/39?download=1&from=/srlng/research/project/4
  • sketch-recognition for tablet computers such as Apple's iPad that can interpret stylus drawings of chemical bonds and element symbols for chemists, circuit components such as batteries or capacitors in an electrical engineering diagram, and even family trees. Tablet computers and smart phones already have software that can recognize handwriting based on http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/sketch-tablet-0219.html language patterns and the relatively limited strokes for each letter. But creating better sketch-recognition software required MIT to combine information about the physical appearance of a final sketch with information about how it was drawn -- the system can recall which way a stylus was moving when it made any given stroke. The MIT software then breaks down the drawn symbol into different parts such as horizontal, vertical or diagonal elements. Algorithms help clean up stray marks and enhance intentional strokes. And a database allows the system to compare drawn symbols to known symbols. http://srlweb.cs.tamu.edu/srlng/research/paper/39?download=1&from=/srlng/research/project/4
  • Optar stands for OPTical ARchiver. It's a codec for encoding data on paper or free software 2D barcode in other words. Optar fits 200kB on an A4 page, then you print it with a laser printer. If you want to read the recording, scan it with a scanner and feed into the decoder program. A practical level of reliability is ensured using forward error correction code (FEC). Automated processing of page batches facilitates storage of files larger than 200kB. It can be used for storing images, sound, and any other type of data. It requires a 600dpi laser printer and scanner. Data is printed on 3x3 pixel dots and encoded with Golay code spread across multiple strips. It prints synchronization imagery to handle media nonlinearities. It is useful for sending data through the postal system. It can be used for publishing data in magazines and other print media. It can be used to archive data on microfiche. Data on paper can be notarized and used for legal archives. It has a much greater data density than printed characters, reducing the size of mandated paper archives. It is useful for data distribution to those without network access. Error correction is able to handle folding of the paper media and other noise. Optar images can be quickly duplicated with a scanner or a digital camera. Paper media is less expensive than floppy disks and USB memory sticks.
  • Optar stands for OPTical ARchiver. It's a codec for encoding data on paper or free software 2D barcode in other words. Optar fits 200kB on an A4 page, then you print it with a laser printer. If you want to read the recording, scan it with a scanner and feed into the decoder program. A practical level of reliability is ensured using forward error correction code (FEC). Automated processing of page batches facilitates storage of files larger than 200kB. It can be used for storing images, sound, and any other type of data. It requires a 600dpi laser printer and scanner. Data is printed on 3x3 pixel dots and encoded with Golay code spread across multiple strips. It prints synchronization imagery to handle media nonlinearities. It is useful for sending data through the postal system. It can be used for publishing data in magazines and other print media. It can be used to archive data on microfiche. Data on paper can be notarized and used for legal archives. It has a much greater data density than printed characters, reducing the size of mandated paper archives. It is useful for data distribution to those without network access. Error correction is able to handle folding of the paper media and other noise. Optar images can be quickly duplicated with a scanner or a digital camera. Paper media is less expensive than floppy disks and USB memory sticks.
  • Optar stands for OPTical ARchiver. It's a codec for encoding data on paper or free software 2D barcode in other words. Optar fits 200kB on an A4 page, then you print it with a laser printer. If you want to read the recording, scan it with a scanner and feed into the decoder program. A practical level of reliability is ensured using forward error correction code (FEC). Automated processing of page batches facilitates storage of files larger than 200kB. It can be used for storing images, sound, and any other type of data. It requires a 600dpi laser printer and scanner. Data is printed on 3x3 pixel dots and encoded with Golay code spread across multiple strips. It prints synchronization imagery to handle media nonlinearities. It is useful for sending data through the postal system. It can be used for publishing data in magazines and other print media. It can be used to archive data on microfiche. Data on paper can be notarized and used for legal archives. It has a much greater data density than printed characters, reducing the size of mandated paper archives. It is useful for data distribution to those without network access. Error correction is able to handle folding of the paper media and other noise. Optar images can be quickly duplicated with a scanner or a digital camera. Paper media is less expensive than floppy disks and USB memory sticks.
  • Transcript

    • 1. VISUAL RESOURCES ASSOCIATION ENGAGING NEW TECHNOLOGIES II (2010) SESSION II Q&A and Fun Stuff (the group)
    • 2. Fun Stuff
    • 3. Fun Stuff
    • 4. Fun Stuff ExcelArt http://www.boydevlin.com/excelart.htm
    • 5. Fun Stuff
    • 6. Fun Stuff
    • 7. Fun Stuff How to calm an angry faculty member with three words
    • 8. Fun Stuff How to make yourself indispensable
    • 9. Fun Stuff How to double our salary
    • 10. Fun Stuff Artisanal Records A return to the human touch
    • 11. Fun Stuff
    • 12. Fun Stuff
    • 13. Fun Stuff MIT Sketch-interpreting software
    • 14. Fun Stuff MIT Sketch-interpreting software
    • 15. Fun Stuff MIT Sketch-interpreting software
    • 16. Fun Stuff MIT Sketch-interpreting software MIT Sketch-interpreting software
    • 17. Fun Stuff MIT Sketch-interpreting software
    • 18. Fun Stuff MIT Sketch-interpreting software
    • 19. Fun Stuff Optar (OPTical ARchiver) http://ronja.twibright.com/optar/
    • 20. Fun Stuff Optar (OPTical ARchiver) http://ronja.twibright.com/optar/
    • 21. Fun Stuff Optar (OPTical ARchiver) http://ronja.twibright.com/optar/
    • 22. Fun Stuff How to get perfect color balance every time
    • 23. Fun Stuff A $300 scanner that outperforms a $10,000 scanner
    • 24. Fun Stuff http://whatdoyousuggest.net/
    • 25. Fun Stuff http://whatdoyousuggest.net/
    • 26. Fun Stuff http://whatdoyousuggest.net/
    • 27. Fun Stuff http://whatdoyousuggest.net/
    • 28. Fun Stuff http://whatdoyousuggest.net/
    • 29. Fun Stuff
    • 30. Fun Stuff
    • 31. Fun Stuff
    • 32. Fun Stuff
    • 33. Fun Stuff
    • 34. Fun Stuff
    • 35. Fun Stuff
    • 36. Fun Stuff
    • 37. ENGAGING NEW TECHNOLOGIES II (2010) THE TABLES Join us and chat informally and have FUN! Table 1 Video—Carolyn Caizzi Table 2 Embedding Metadata—Greg Reser Table 3 Gadgets—Susan Jane Williams Table 4 Cloud Computing—John Trendler and Heather Cleary Table 5 Getting Started—Meghan Musolff and Betha Whitlow

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