Evrgreen prepairingstudents v1.3

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  • Mutton Busting
  • In ancient Japan the haiku poets used phonemes--rather than symbols--therefore the counts may be off a bit when you are reading these haiku as a reference.
    The moment two bubbles
    are united, they both vanish.
    A lotus blooms.
    Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time
    (5) The moment two are
    (7) united they both vanish, A
    (5) lotus blooms here.
    Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), Adapted by Brazell
    http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time
  • “IDC said worldwide shipments this year of app-enabled devices, which include smartphones and media tablets such as the iPad, will reach 284 million. In 2011, makers will ship 377 million of these devices, and in 2012, the number will reach 462 million shipments, exceeding PC shipments..”
  • Vitruvian Man
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance
  • Need source
  • Within a year of their introduction to the market, researchers in Sweden developed the first implantable pacemaker. Medtronic licensed the first implantable pacemaker in the U.S. a few years later.
    A Pacemaker the Size of a Tic Tac
    Medtronic is using microelectronics to make a pacemaker so small it can be injected.
    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2011
    BY EMILY SINGER
    E-mail|Audio »|Print
    Medtronic, the world's largest medical-device maker, is using microelectronics and chip manufacturing to shrink pacemakers—implanted devices that regulate the heart's rhythm. Whereas current pacemakers are about as big as a silver dollar, Medtronic's device would be smaller than a tic tac. At that size, the device would be small enough to be inserted via catheter, rather than invasive surgery.
    The device is still a research instrument, says Stephen Oesterle, Medtronic's senior vice president for medicine and technology, but it could be on the market in five years.
    So far, Medtronic has developed most of the components—a circuit board, an oscillator to generate current, a capacitor to store and rapidly dispense charge, memory to store data, and a telemetry system to wirelessly transfer that data. The company has used chip manufacturing technology to assemble these components onto a wafer. Oesterle estimates that 60 to 70 pacemakers can be made from a single six-inch wafer, which the company creates at its own wafer fabrication plant in Arizona.
    "What we don't have that is fundamental to a pacemaker is a way to power the chip," says Oesterle. The company is working with startups that make thin-film batteries and other innovative power sources, though Oesterle declined to give further details.
    Medtronic's current-generation device houses all of the components in a small case implanted under the clavicle. Jolts of electricity are delivered to the heart via intercardiac leads. Eliminating the need for leads, which Oesterle calls "invasive and inefficient," is one of the major motivators in shrinking the device. Impedance between the wires and biological tissue ups the power requirement for the device. And the leads can cause complications if they fail. "You are stuck with either putting in new leads, which takes up space in the vein, or you can pull the leads out, which can risk tearing the heart or blood vessels," says Emile Georges Daoud, a physician and professor of cardiovascular medicine at Ohio State University.
    A system small enough to be placed exactly where the electricity is needed would eliminate these issues. "If you have the pacing element at the area you want to pace, it doesn't take much power," says Oesterle. "All you need to do is stimulate one cell in the heart and create a wave of depolarization."
    A smaller device would also be much easier to implant than existing versions. Scientists envision delivering it via the same procedure used in cardiac catheterization, in which a doctor inserts a thin plastic tube into an artery or vein, threading the tube all the way to the heart. The procedure is less invasive than surgical implantation, and more physicians are capable of doing it. "You can almost shoot these things in like bullets," says Oesterle.
  • Within a year of their introduction to the market, researchers in Sweden developed the first implantable pacemaker. Medtronic licensed the first implantable pacemaker in the U.S. a few years later.
    A Pacemaker the Size of a Tic Tac
    Medtronic is using microelectronics to make a pacemaker so small it can be injected.
    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2011
    BY EMILY SINGER
    E-mail|Audio »|Print
    Medtronic, the world's largest medical-device maker, is using microelectronics and chip manufacturing to shrink pacemakers—implanted devices that regulate the heart's rhythm. Whereas current pacemakers are about as big as a silver dollar, Medtronic's device would be smaller than a tic tac. At that size, the device would be small enough to be inserted via catheter, rather than invasive surgery.
    The device is still a research instrument, says Stephen Oesterle, Medtronic's senior vice president for medicine and technology, but it could be on the market in five years.
    So far, Medtronic has developed most of the components—a circuit board, an oscillator to generate current, a capacitor to store and rapidly dispense charge, memory to store data, and a telemetry system to wirelessly transfer that data. The company has used chip manufacturing technology to assemble these components onto a wafer. Oesterle estimates that 60 to 70 pacemakers can be made from a single six-inch wafer, which the company creates at its own wafer fabrication plant in Arizona.
    "What we don't have that is fundamental to a pacemaker is a way to power the chip," says Oesterle. The company is working with startups that make thin-film batteries and other innovative power sources, though Oesterle declined to give further details.
    Medtronic's current-generation device houses all of the components in a small case implanted under the clavicle. Jolts of electricity are delivered to the heart via intercardiac leads. Eliminating the need for leads, which Oesterle calls "invasive and inefficient," is one of the major motivators in shrinking the device. Impedance between the wires and biological tissue ups the power requirement for the device. And the leads can cause complications if they fail. "You are stuck with either putting in new leads, which takes up space in the vein, or you can pull the leads out, which can risk tearing the heart or blood vessels," says Emile Georges Daoud, a physician and professor of cardiovascular medicine at Ohio State University.
    A system small enough to be placed exactly where the electricity is needed would eliminate these issues. "If you have the pacing element at the area you want to pace, it doesn't take much power," says Oesterle. "All you need to do is stimulate one cell in the heart and create a wave of depolarization."
    A smaller device would also be much easier to implant than existing versions. Scientists envision delivering it via the same procedure used in cardiac catheterization, in which a doctor inserts a thin plastic tube into an artery or vein, threading the tube all the way to the heart. The procedure is less invasive than surgical implantation, and more physicians are capable of doing it. "You can almost shoot these things in like bullets," says Oesterle.
  • The first portable pacemakers were about the size of a small paperback book. Within a year of their introduction to the market, researchers in Sweden developed the first implantable pacemaker. Medtronic licensed the first implantable pacemaker in the U.S. a few years later. (Photo Courtesy of Medtronic)
  • In ancient Japan the haiku poets used phonemes--rather than symbols--therefore the counts may be off a bit when you are reading these haiku as a reference.
    The moment two bubbles
    are united, they both vanish.
    A lotus blooms.
    Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time
    (5) The moment two are
    (7) united they both vanish, A
    (5) lotus blooms here.
    Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), Adapted by Brazell
    http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time
  • In ancient Japan the haiku poets used phonemes--rather than symbols--therefore the counts may be off a bit when you are reading these haiku as a reference.
    The moment two bubbles
    are united, they both vanish.
    A lotus blooms.
    Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time
    (5) The moment two are
    (7) united they both vanish, A
    (5) lotus blooms here.
    Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), Adapted by Brazell
    http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time
  • Evrgreen prepairingstudents v1.3

    1. 1. Student Futures: A Story about Emerging Technology, Jobs and Students How The Future Works Jim.brazell@radicalplatypus.com
    2. 2. What do you think of when I say?
    3. 3. Robot
    4. 4. John Hart / AP
    5. 5. http://ae45ipb.wordpress.com/2009/12/31/masa-depan-pertanian-ada-di-tangan-robotikabisakah/
    6. 6. http://ae45ipb.wordpress.com/2009/12/31/masa-depan-pertanian-ada-di-tangan-robotikabisakah/
    7. 7. http://ilovesubstance.com/2007/transformers-movie-posters-optimus-prime-megatron/
    8. 8. http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,663371_10,00.html
    9. 9. http://www.cartoonscrapbook.com/03pics/jetsons09.jpg
    10. 10. http://www.examiner.com/classic-movies-in-anaheim/top-5-classic-sci-fi-films
    11. 11. http://robonaut.jsc.nasa.gov/iss/#issmission
    12. 12. http://robonaut.jsc.nasa.gov/iss/#issmission
    13. 13. http://robonaut.jsc.nasa.gov/iss/#issmission
    14. 14. http://robonaut.jsc.nasa.gov/iss/#issmission
    15. 15. http://robonaut.jsc.nasa.gov/iss/#issmission @AstroRobonaut
    16. 16. Software Computer ElectricalMechanical ROBOT Relationships = Systems
    17. 17. Your car is a robot. TSTC West TX, Sweetwater, 10.31.2006
    18. 18. http://www.calcars.org/photos.html
    19. 19. Tesla 256 MPGe
    20. 20. http://www.cat.com/
    21. 21. Silent Revolution
    22. 22. 1,000 MPG eq. Fuel Cell Car
    23. 23. Software Computer ElectricalMechanical Chemistry Relationships = Systems
    24. 24. The New Face of Innovation
    25. 25. Innovation Model
    26. 26. Source, DIAC, Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility (CPSR), Pattern Languages for the 21st Century, Brazell and Monroe, 2003
    27. 27. Elementary spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Robot competition plus career and academic exploration and history of science and technology.
    28. 28. spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Middle School
    29. 29. US First-EISD Andrew Schuetze San Antonio,TX High School
    30. 30. Holmes High School and San Antonio Cyber Initiative
    31. 31. How CyberPatriot works • Multi-round competition – Qualifying rounds are virtual and teams compete simultaneously – Teams download VMware images and attempt to secure them over a given period of time – Teams connected to centralized scoring platform – Teams graded against known solution sets • Finals held in Orlando and Washington DC Cyber Patriot highschoolcdc.com
    32. 32. Arts Health STEMAcademics CTE STEM +ARTS
    33. 33. Free Tools
    34. 34. http://linux.softpedia.com/get/Education/KTurtle-2303.shtml KTurtle is a Logo programming language interpreter. The Logo programming language is very easy and thus it can be used by young children. Logo is ideal for teaching kids the basics of programming, mathematics and geometry. One of the reasons many children like Logo is because of the turtle, a programmable icon which can be moved around the screen with simple commands and can be programmed to draw objects.
    35. 35. Little Wizard (Windows, Linux) Little Wizards is a program that was specifically created with primary school children in mind. It focuses on teaching kids the basic elements of all programming languages, including: variables, expressions, conditions, logical blocks and loops. All of these elements is represented by an icon which allows the building of a program to be done using only a mouse http://littlewizard.sourceforge.net/downloads.html
    36. 36. scratch.mit.edu
    37. 37. http://www.sophos.com/lp/threatbeaters-dp/
    38. 38. Assignment
    39. 39. What do you enjoy doing? What are you passionate about? HAIKU 5, 7, 5
    40. 40. How is technology changing living, learning and working in the 21st century?
    41. 41. Haiku is a Japanese poem composed of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables. (5) The moment two are (7) united they both vanish (5) A lotus blooms here. Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), Adapted by Brazell http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time Bob Allen ideas
    42. 42. Haiku – SLC (5) Keystrokes on canvas (7) Mixed paints in a petri dish (5) And murals of math
    43. 43. Haiku – Abilene, TX (5) Technology’s nice, (7) Enhances teaching, learning too, but (5) Human hands must type
    44. 44. Or, if you twitter #radicalplatypus @radicalplatypus
    45. 45. Haiku (5) Staying in the past (7) Isn’t good for our future (5) Innovate today
    46. 46. If you draw, sing or have some other talent—use it! Compose a song, draw a school design…
    47. 47. What do you enjoy doing? What are you passionate about? HAIKU 5, 7, 5
    48. 48. Vocation
    49. 49. Vocation - from the Latin verb vocare, “to call.” In the modern context it means a passion or an inclination for a type of work for which one is especially suited. Meaning-Purpose-Calling-Passion
    50. 50. What do you think of when I say?
    51. 51. Computer
    52. 52. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html Nokia Research Center, Helsinki Finland in MIT Technology Review How many of you have a cell phone in your pocket?
    53. 53. In historic shift, smart phones, tablets to overtake PCs Computer World, Dec. 6, 2010 http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9199918/In_historic_shift_smartphones_tablets_to_overtake_PCs
    54. 54. Mixed Reality
    55. 55. Sea Land SpaceAir cyberSPACE How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    56. 56. Imagine the games we can play…
    57. 57. Social Cognitive ImaginaryPhysical Cyberspace STEM +ARTS
    58. 58. Innovation Model
    59. 59. Engineering Math TechnologyScience ARTS How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    60. 60. Ocoee Demonstration Middle School
    61. 61. Orlando Tech – High School Program
    62. 62. Orlando Tech – High School Program
    63. 63. Orlando FIEA University Program
    64. 64. Free Tools
    65. 65. arcademicskillbuilders.com
    66. 66. iCivics (formerly Our Courts) is a web-based education project designed to teach students civics and inspire them to be active participants in our democracy. iCivics is the vision of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, who is concerned that students are not getting the information and tools they need for civic participation, and that civics teachers need better materials and support. http://www.icivics.org/
    67. 67. ©numedeon,inc.2004 SPACE STATION
    68. 68. Whyville.net
    69. 69. Whyville Planeworks
    70. 70. Assignment
    71. 71. What do you want to be when you grow up? HAIKU 5, 7, 5 or 2, 4 , 6, 8, 2 If you are working with a student – define passion in relation to a career pursuit…
    72. 72. Haiku – Abilene, TX (5) All the venues merge (7) CTE – arts – science (5) Our future opens
    73. 73. Haiku – SLC (5) Soil, garden flowering (7) Chemistry, art, genetics (5) Future gardens grow
    74. 74. Haiku – SLC (5) Arts, humanities (7) Math, science, technology (5) Working Together
    75. 75. If you draw, sing or have some other talent—use it! Compose a song, draw a school design…
    76. 76. What do you want to be when you grow up? HAIKU 5, 7, 5 or 2, 4 , 6, 8, 2 If you are working with a student – define passion in relation to a career pursuit…
    77. 77. What do you think of when I say?
    78. 78. Video Game
    79. 79. Your body controls the computer
    80. 80. Thisisarobot
    81. 81. Or, is the computer controlling us? Who is controlling whom?
    82. 82. What happens when robot meets cyberspace?
    83. 83. Sea Land SpaceAir robotSPACE STEM +ARTS
    84. 84. In 1958, engineer Earl Bakken of Minneapolis, Minnesota, produced the first wearable external pacemaker http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2007/10/29/batterypacemaker/
    85. 85. A Pacemaker the Size of a Tic Tac - Medtronic is using microelectronics to make a pacemaker so small it can be injected. Technology Review http://www.technologyreview.com/biomedicine/32436/? nlid=4177
    86. 86. Social Cognitive ImaginaryPhysical robotSPACE STEM +ARTS
    87. 87. Free Tools
    88. 88. http://www.squeakland.org/ http://www.squeak.org/ With Etoys, children can draw their own sketches then bring them to life by writing "scripts" that tell the sketches what to do. Children can then put sketches and text in digital books with multiple pages, allowing them to create interactive stories to share with the world.
    89. 89. http://www.koducup.us
    90. 90. ALICE.org
    91. 91. Assignment
    92. 92. Or, if you twitter #radicalplatypus @radicalplatypus
    93. 93. What do I want to learn about in school? HAIKU 5, 7, 5 or 2, 4, 6, 8, 2
    94. 94. Haiku - SLC Students and teachers Collaborate and invent Working as one team
    95. 95. Haiku - SLC (5) A techno elder (7) Opens new connections up (5) Becomes a newborn
    96. 96. If you draw, sing or have some other talent—use it! Compose a song, draw a school design…
    97. 97. What do I want to learn about in school? HAIKU 5, 7, 5 or 2, 4, 6, 8, 2
    98. 98. Cinquain - SDPS, World (2) Love is (4) Commitment to (6) each other. Beauty is (8) adaptation to the world now (2) --forever. Bob Allen ideas
    99. 99. Cinquain (2) The first (4) person to walk (6) on the Martian surface (8) will be from Evergreen district (2) for sure. Bob Allen ideas
    100. 100. Student Futures: A Story about Emerging Technology, Jobs and Students How The Future Works Jim.brazell@radicalplatypus.com

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