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Flood in pakistan part 11-Eid in Refugee Camps
 

Flood in pakistan part 11-Eid in Refugee Camps

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  • Hi Nubiagroup,

    Your presentation Flood in pakistan part 11-Eid in Refugee Camps is currently showcased on the News & Politics page by our editorial team.

    It’s likely to remain there for the next 16-20 hours...
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  • Thank you dear Bernard and Ali - i do my best to keep the pression - yes they really need help, and no matter if we don't have the same country or religion, we are all human being and if we don't help them who will do it ? how can we watch this happening, watch these people suffering and loose everything without giving any help ...
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  • Nubia you are doing a good job. No one should not forget that, and help to the Pakistan...
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  • Oui Sally, c'est bien triste et surtout PESANT de constater ce manque de réactivité mondiale pour ne pas dire 'relative' indifférence. D'autant plus difficile pour la petite poignée d'être humains... ceux qui ont pris conscience immédiatement du drame... et qui ce sont engagés rapidement dans l'action. Merci Nubia pour le partage. Puisse vos diaporamas circuler dans le monde entier et sensibiliser chacun et chacune à cette noble entraide humaine au delà de toute contingence politique.
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  • Yes dear Sally it's so sad to see this misery :(
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    Flood in pakistan part 11-Eid in Refugee Camps Flood in pakistan part 11-Eid in Refugee Camps Presentation Transcript

    • Flood in Pakistan Eid in refugee camps
    • Pakistan flood trauma dulls Eid festive spirit Pakistani Muslims on Saturday took part in low-key celebrations for the Eid al-Fitr festival, as millions still languish without shelter after the nation's worst-ever floods. Eid is the most important festival in the Islamic calendar -- marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan -- but celebrations were muted Saturday as the fallout from devastating floods continues. The deluges have left 10 million people without shelter nationwide, according to UN figures, with UN spokesman Maurizio Giuliano describing it as "one of the worst humanitarian disasters in UN history." In a normal year Pakistanis would have been scurrying home last night for a weekend of gluttony-tinged indulgence marking Eid al-Fitr, the end of the fasting month of Ramadan and Islam's near equivalent of Christmas. But this is no normal year. With 21 million people - almost one-eighth of the population - affected by the worst floods in memory, which began more than six weeks ago , and broad swathes of the country still under water, many have no homes to go to, and no mosques to attend, and have dragged on through Ramadan, with more than eight million reliant on aid handouts for survival. President Asif Ali Zardari and Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani mentioned the "miseries and grief" of the flood victims in their separate Eid messages to nation. "We cannot celebrate the day with traditional fanfare and festivities when millions of our countrymen have been rendered shelterless as villages, towns and cities have been destroyed by the floods," Zardari said. Away from the flood-ravaged areas, in the main cities, sparkling Eid lights still drape the streets. But inside homes a new austerity has curtailed the festive spirit.
    • Reuters Pictures - Flood victims reach for aid distributed to their relief camp during Eid al-Fitr in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 11, 2010. Starting nearly six weeks ago, Pakistan's worst ever floods killed more than 1,750 people and inflicted nearly $43 billion (28 billion pounds) worth of damage to infrastructure and agriculture, the mainstay of the economy.
    • AP Photo A Pakistani girl who survived floods wears a pair of sandals provided by a charity organization on the occasion of Eid, which ends the fasting month of Ramadan, at a camp set up for displaced people in Nowshera, near Peshawar, Pakistan, Friday, Sept. 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Razia, a flood victim whose husband died earlier this week is comforted by an aid worker visiting her village during Eid al-Fitr in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 11, 2010. Starting nearly six weeks ago, Pakistan's worst ever floods killed more than 1,750 people and inflicted nearly $43 billion (28 billion pounds) worth of damage to infrastructure and agriculture, the mainstay of the economy.
    • A Pakistani girl makes hair-styling of her fellow next to the rubble of a collapsed house on Eid al-Fitr day in a flood-hit area of Ghazi Ghat near Multan, Pakistan, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2010. Millions of Pakistani flood victims celebrated Islam's most joyous festival in donated tents and makeshift shelters on Saturday as the country's leaders, criticized for an inadequate response to the disaster, pledged more aid.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim takes a bath outside his tent as he prepares for Eid-al-Fitr celebrations while taking refuge in a relief camp for flood victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province on September 11, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim baby sleeps in a hammock as a man reads the Koran during Eid-al-Fitr celebrations while taking refuge in a relief camp for flood victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province on September 11, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims offer Eid-al-Fitr prayers in a makeshift mosque while they take refuge in a relief camp for flood victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province September 11, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim shows her henna decorated hand as she prepares to celebrate Eid-al-Fitr while taking refuge with her family in a relief camp in Sukkur, Pakistan's Sindh province on September 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim shows her henna decorated hand as she prepares to celebrate Eid-al-Fitr while taking refuge with her family in a relief camp in Sukkur, Pakistan's Sindh province on September 10, 201
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim takes a bath outside his tent as he prepares for Eid-al-Fitr celebrations while taking refuge in a relief camp for flood victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province on September 11, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Nine-year-old Safia, a flood victim, shows her henna decorated hands as she Getty Images prepares to celebrate Eid-al-Fitr while taking refuge in a relief camp in An internally displaced Pakistani young boy sits on the ground at a camp Sukkur, Pakistan's Sindh province September 10, 2010. in Sukkur on September 10, 2010.
    • AP Photo AP Photo Pakistani flood affected people prepare to celebrate the Eid, Pakistani flood affected people get ready to celebrate the Eid, ending of ending the fasting month of Ramadan, at a camp setup for displaced the fasting month of Ramadan, in a camp set up for displaced people in people in Karachi,Pakistan on Thursday, Sept. 9, 2010. Karachi, Pakistan on Thursday, Sept. 9, 2010.
    • Getty Images AP Photo Pakistani villagers ride a donkey cart in Sukkur on September 8, 2010. Pakistani flood affected children show currency notes they received as a Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, gift to celebrate Eid, ending of fasting month of Ramadan, in a camp setup the United Nations said Tuesday, as authorities rushed to bolster river for displaced people in Charsada, near Peshawar, Pakistan on Thursday, defences to save two towns from catastrophe. Sept. 9, 2010.
    •  AP Photo Pakistani flood affected women and children decorate their hands as they prepare to celebrate the Eid, which ends the fasting month of Ramadan, at a camp setup for displaced people in Karachi, Pakistan on Thursday, Sept. 9, 2010.
    • An Internally displaced Pakistani girls shows her palm decorated with henna or mendhi as she queues to receive a package for Eid Al-Fitr at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe. - Getty Images
    • Getty Images Flood affected Pakistani children read books at a makeshift school on ahigher ground in southern Sindh province's flood-hit Kandkot on September 8, 2010.
    • AP Photo A Pakistani baby takes a bath at a camp for people affected by floods in Muzaffargarh district, Punjab province, Pakistan on Friday Sept. 10, 2010.
    • AP Photo A Pakistani boy plays with a toy race car that was given to him as a gift for Eid at a camp for people affected by floods in Muzaffargarh district, Punjab province, Pakistan on Friday Sept. 10, 2010.
    • Internally displaced Pakistani children show off their new clothes which they received as part of a package for Eid Al-Fitr from donors organised by Institute Business and Administration (IBA) at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010. While most of the Muslim world celebrated Eid on September 10, the festival falls on September 11, in Pakistan. Bringing an end to the fasting month of Ramadan, it should be an occasion for family celebration and gift-giving, but for Pakistan's poor and hungry flood survivors, this year's holiday offers more rain and little joy. - Getty Images
    • Getty Images Internally displaced Pakistani people walk as they receive a package for Eid Al-Fitr from donors organised by Institute Business and Administration (IBA) at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010.
    • Getty Images An internally displaced Pakistani young girl stands next to her mother as people queue to receive a package for Eid Al-Fitr from charities at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010.
    • Getty Images An Internally displaced Pakistani boy (R) looks on as father checks a t-shirt after receiving a package for Eid Al-Fitr from donors organised by Institute Business and Administration (IBA) at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010.
    • Getty Images Internally displaced Pakistani women queue to receive a package for Eid Al-Fitr from charities at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010.
    • Getty Images An Internally displaced Pakistani woman feeds her child as she queues with others to receive a package for Eid Al-Fitr from charities at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010.
    • A Pakistani girl who survived floods wears a new dress provided on the occasion of Eid, which ends the fasting month of Ramadan, at a camp set up for displaced people in Nowshera, near Peshawar, Pakistan, Friday, Sept. 10, 2010. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)
    • Getty Images An Internally displaced Pakistani man walks towards a tent after receiving a package for Eid Al-Fitr from donors organised by Institute Business and Administration (IBA) at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A young boy looks on as he sits in a line with fellow villagers and flood victims during an Eid al-Fitr mass outdoor prayer ceremony near a relief camp in Nowshera, Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims have their Eid meal after an Eid al-Fitr outdoor mass prayer ceremony near a relief camp in Nowshera, Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim prays during an Eid al-Fitr outdoor mass prayer ceremony near a relief camp in Nowshera, Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 10, 2010.
    • AP Photo Pakistani flood survivors eat rice on the occasion of Eid, which ends the fasting month of Ramadan, at a camp set up for displaced people in Nowshera, near Peshawar, Pakistan, Friday, Sept. 10, 2010.
    • AP Photo Pakistani flood affected people offer Eid prayers, which ends the fasting month of Ramadan, at a camp set up for displaced people in Nowshera, near Peshawar, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 10, 2010.
    • An internally displaced boy receives a package for Eid al-Fitr from charities as other queue at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe. The Eid festival, marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, has been declared on September 10 for most parts of the world including Pakistan. - Getty Images
    • Getty Images An internally displaced Pakistani family open their Eid al-Fitr package donated by charities during the Muslim celebrations at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010.
    • An internally displaced young Pakistani girl holds up her new dress received from charities as others queue for their Eid al-Fitr packages at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010. - Getty Images
    • Reuters Pictures A volunteer who works for a Pakistani humanitarian non-governmental organization (NGO) distributes an Eid meal to villagers and flood victims after an Eid al- Fitr mass outdoor prayer ceremony near a relief camp in Nowshera, Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 10,2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A Pakistani humanitarian non-governmental organization (NGO) volunteer (front) adjusts a cooking fire under a steel container as villagers and flood victims line up to receive an Eid meal after an Eid al-Fitr mass outdoor prayer ceremony near a relief camp in Nowshera, Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A young flood victim waits for a Eid al-Fitr mass outdoor prayer ceremony near a relief camp in Nowshera, Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victim Hussain Bux, 70, takes care of his grandchild outside his tent while taking refuge in a relief camp for victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province September 9, 2010.
    • AP Photo Pakistani flood affected people wait to get food in a camp setup for displaced people in Charsada, near Peshawar, Pakistan on Thursday, Sept. 9,2010.
    • A flood victims sit outside their family tent while taking refuge at a makeshift relief camp in Nowshera in Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 9, 2010. Pakistan, whose economy has been battered by the worst floods in its history, needs to abide by terms of an IMF bailout loan by enforcing fiscal austerity, the chances of which happening appear closeto zero. - Reuters Pictures
    • AP Photo Pakistani flood affected children show their gifts to celebrate Eid, ending of fasting month of Ramadan, in a camp setup for displaced people in Charsada, near Peshawar, Pakistan on Thursday, Sept. 9, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Reuters Pictures A Flood victim waits with others for aid to be distributed during Eid al-Fitr Pakistani flood victims wait for aid to be distributedduring Eid al-Fitr at their to their village in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province relief camp in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September September 11, 2010. Starting nearly six weeks ago,Pakistan's worst ever 11, 2010. Starting nearly six weeks ago,Pakistan's worst ever floods killed more floods killed more than 1,750 people and inflicted nearly $43 billion (28 than 1,750 people and inflicted nearly $43 billion (28 billion pounds) worth of billion pounds) worth of damage to infrastructure and agriculture, the damage to infrastructure and agriculture, the mainstay of the economy. mainstay of the economy.
    • In this photo taken Thursday Sept. 9, 2010, Pakistani children affected by floods react, seen from a hole on a wall as they line up to receive relief goods in preparation for Eid in Muzaffargarh district, Punjab Province, Pakistan. Millions of Pakistani flood victims celebrated Islam's most joyous festival in donated tents and makeshift shelters on Saturday as the country's leaders, criticized for an inadequate response to the disaster,pledged more aid. - AP Photo
    • AP Photo Pakistani flood affected children receive rice as they prepare to celebrate Eid, which ends the fasting month of Ramadan, at a camp setup for displaced people in Muzaffargarh district, Punjab province, Pakistan on Thursday, Sept. 9, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims stretch their hands towards aid workers distributing gifts, as Pakistani Muslims prepare to celebrate Eid Al-Fitr, the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, at their relief camp in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 9, 2010. Pakistan, whose economy has beenbattered by the worst floods in its history, needs to abide by terms of an IMF bailout loan by enforcing fiscal austerity, the chances of which happening appear close to zero.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim bakes bread on a tray at a relief camp in Charsadda, Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 9, 2010.
    • Getty Images Internally displaced Pakistani grandmother Janal holds the hand of her three-day-old grandchild at a camp in Sukkur on September 9, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim collects leftovers in an empty pot at a food distribution point while taking refuge with her family in a relief camp for flood victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province September 9, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Khanzadi, a flood victim, cooks vegetables while taking refuge outside a relief camp in Sukkur, Pakistan's Sindh province on September 10, 2010.
    • Internally displaced Pakistani children receive 10 Pakistani rupees (12 US cents) as part of Eid Al-Fitr packages at a camp in Sukkur on September 9, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe. AFP PHOTO/ADEK BERRY (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
    • Getty Images An internally displaced Pakistani girl carries an infant as she walks down an aisle of tents at a camp in Sukkur on September 9, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe.
    • AP Photo A Pakistani flood affected girl cries as she fails to get gifts given by women volunteers as they prepare to celebrate the Eid, which ends the fasting month of Ramadan, at a camp setup for displaced people in Muzaffargarh district, Punjab province, Pakistan on Thursday, Sept. 9, 2010.
    • Getty Images Internally displaced Pakistani children Oran (R) and Rubina (L) cradle their newly born twin siblings Belawal and Salwa at a camp in Sukkur on September 9, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim looks on as she stands next to her sister who is carrying her younger brother at a flood relief camp in Charsadda, Pakistan's northwest Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province September 9, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims get their hands painted with henna as Pakistani Muslims prepare to celebrate Eid Al-Fitr, the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, at their relief camp in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 9, 2010. Pakistan, whose economy has been battered by the worst floods in its history, needs to abide by terms of an IMF bailout loan by enforcing fiscal austerity, the chances of which happening appear close to zero.
    • An UN helicopter drops relief goods to Pakistanis displaced by floods on higher ground in the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood- threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincial irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages in its path. TOPSHOTS / AFP PHOTO / RIZWAN TABASSUM (Photo credit should read RIZWAN TABASSUM/AFP/Getty Images)
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims argue over a small banknote given by aid workers during Eid al-Fitr at their relief camp in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 11, 2010. Starting nearly six weeks ago, Pakistan's worst ever floods killed more than 1,750 people and inflicted nearly $43 billion (28 billion pounds) worth of damage to infrastructure and agriculture, the mainstay of the economy.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim holds her baby while asking for aid distributed during Eid al-Fitr at a relief camp in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 11, 2010. Starting nearly six weeks ago, Pakistan's worst ever floods killed more than 1,750 people and inflicted nearly $43 billion (28 billion pounds) worth of damage to infrastructure and agriculture, the mainstay of the economy.
    • AP Photo Pakistani flood-affected women and children wait for their turn to get Eid al-Fitr gift distributing by volunteers at a camp outskirt of Karachi, Pakistan on Saturday, Sept. 11, 2010. Millions of Pakistani flood victims celebrated Islam's most joyous festival in donated tents and makeshift shelters on Saturday as the country's leaders, criticized for an inadequate response to the disaster, pledged more aid.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim holds her two-year-old baby Aasia, dressed in new clothing donated by a charity organization, as they celebrate Eid-al-Fitr while taking refuge in a relief camp for flood victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province on September 11, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim plays with a balloon outside his tent as he celebrates Eid-al-Fitr while taking refuge with his family in a relief camp for flood victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province September 11, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim, wearing new clothes donated by a charity organization, plays with a balloon outside his tent while celebrating Eid-al-Fitr in a relief camp for flood victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province September 11, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Pakistani flood victims inspect the damage around the small Sadikiya mosque at their flooded village after praying on the Eid Al-Fitr, in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 11, 2010. The European Union appears likely to grant trade concessions worth hundreds of millions of euros to flood-hit Pakistan as part of an effort to maintain stability in the country, diplomats said on Friday. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid Al-Fitr, the religious festival that marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.
    • Reuters Pictures Pakistani flood victims gather outside the damaged Sadikiya mosque in their flooded village after praying during Eid Al-Fitr in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 11, 2010. The European Union appears likely to grant trade concessions worth hundreds of millions of euros to flood-hit Pakistan as part of an effort to maintain stability in the country, diplomats said on Friday. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid el Fitr, the religious festival that marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.
    • Reuters Pictures Pakistani flood victims gather outside the damaged Sadikiya mosque in their flooded village after praying during Eid Al-Fitr in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 11, 2010. The European Union appears likely to grant trade concessions worth hundreds of millions of euros to flood-hit Pakistan as part of an effort to maintain stability in the country, diplomats said on Friday. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid el Fitr, the religious festival that marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.
    • Reuters Pictures Pakistani flood victims pray during Eid Al-Fitr outside the damaged Sadikiya mosque in their flooded village in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 11, 2010. The European Union appears likely to grant trade concessions worth hundreds of millions of euros to flood-hit Pakistan as part of an effort to maintain stability in the country, diplomats said on Friday. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid el Fitr, the religious festival that marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.
    • Getty Images Stranded flood victims shine a torch at night as they wait to be evacuated by Pakistani special forces Navy, north of Dadu, Sindh province, Pakistan, on September 10, 2010. The Pakistani military are still evacuating people on small areas of land and villages surrounded by deep water in Sindh, six weeks after flooding began as flood waters continue to overcome new villages. The overstretched army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the widespread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.
    • AP Photo Pakistani flood survivors move to safer areas in Jaffarabad, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 10, 2010.
    • Getty Images Pakistani Special Forces Navy return with rescued flood victims, north of Dadu, Sindh province, Pakistan, on September 10, 2010. The Pakistani military are still evacuating small areas of land and villages surrounded by deep water in Sindh, six weeks after flooding began as flood waters continue to overcome new villages. The overstretched army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the widespread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.
    • Getty Images A Pakistani Army helicopter drops aid to flood victims cut off and surrounded by deep water, north of Dadu, Sindh province, Pakistan, on September 10, 2010. The Pakistani military are still evacuating small areas of land and villages surrounded by deep water in Sindh, six weeks after flooding began as flood waters continue to overcome new villages. The overstretched army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the widespread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country submerged in the floods.
    • Getty Images Flood victims climb down from their roof to collect aid dropped by a Pakistani Army helicopter, north of Dadu, Sindh province, Pakistan, on September 10, 2010. The Pakistani military are still evacuating small areas of land and villages surrounded by deep water in Sindh, six weeks after flooding began as flood waters continue to overcome new villages. The overstretched army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the widespread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country submerged in flood water.
    • DADU, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 10: A woman displaced by flooding holds her newborn baby after having been evacuated by Pakistan Navy soldiers from their flooded village on September 10, 2010 near Dadu in Sindh province, Pakistan. Six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been affected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the widespread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. - Getty Images
    • BHANGAR, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 10: Flood victims and relatives lay to rest the body of village elder Mohammad Ismail, who according to villagers died due to the stress of losses incurred due to flooding, on September 10, 2010 in the village of Bhangar, near Dadu in Sindh province, Pakistan. Six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat cropsdestroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been affected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the widespread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. - Getty Images
    • BHANGAR, PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 10: Flood victims pray over the body of village elder Mohammad Ismail, who according to villagers died due to the stress of losses incurred due to flooding, on September 10, 2010 in the village of Bhangar, near Dadu in Sindh province, Pakistan. Six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been affected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the widespread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. - Getty Images
    • Getty Images Pakistani flood victims gather outside their collapsed house in Chandanvillage, in the district of Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of peopletrying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincialirrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vastswathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flowsouth towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages in its path.
    • Getty Images Pakistanis displaced by floods rush toward an UN helicopter distributing relief goods on a damaged road in the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10,2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincial irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages in its path.
    • Getty Images A Pakistani naval soldier rescue an elderly flood affected villager in the flood-hit Khanpor Kali Mori village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincial irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages in its path.
    • Getty Images Pakistani flood affected villagers wait to board into a Pakistan's navy boat as they evacuate the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. A Pakistani flood affected villager woman holds her daughter as they wait to board onto Pakistan's navy boats while they evacuate the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincia irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages in its path. -Getty Images
    • Getty Images A Pakistani naval soldier arrives with a boat to rescue flood affected villagers in the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincial irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and stillthreatens to submerge more towns and villages in its path.
    • Getty Images Pakistanis displaced by floods carry relief goods boxes dropped by an UN helicopter on a damaged road in the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincial irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages inits path.
    • Getty Images Pakistanis displaced by floods carry relief goods boxes dropped by an UN helicopter on a damaged road in the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincial irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages inits path.
    • Getty Images An UN helicopter drops relief goods to Pakistanis displaced by floods on higher ground in the flood-hit Chandan village, district Dadu on September 10, 2010. Fresh rains hampered rescue efforts in Pakistan's south on September 10 as thousands of people trying to leave flood-threatened towns remained stranded, a Sindh provincial irrigation minister said. The catastrophic flooding that has inundated vast swathes of Pakistan, killing 1,760 people so far, has continued to flow south towards the Arabian Sea and still threatens to submerge more towns and villages in its path.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim holds her head after she was injured while fighting for food being distributed from a truck in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 10, 2010. Six weeks after Pakistan was ravaged by floods, the European Union is still struggling to decide how to help beyond emergency aid, with a plan to offer lucrative trade concessions locked indispute.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims run after the truck distributing aid in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 10, 2010. Six weeks after Pakistan was ravaged by floods, the European Union is still struggling to decide how to help beyond emergency aid, with a plan to offer lucrative trade concessions locked in dispute.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims have their hands decorated with henna as Pakistani Muslims prepare to celebrate Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, at their relief camp in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 10, 2010. Six weeks after Pakistan was ravaged by floods, the European Union is still struggling to decide how to help beyond emergency aid, with a plan to offer lucrative trade concessions locked indispute.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims have their hands decorated by aid workers as Pakistani Muslims prepare to celebrate Eid Al-Fitr, marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, at their relief camp in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 10, 2010. Six weeks after Pakistan was ravaged by floods, the European Union is still struggling to decide how to help beyond emergency aid, with a plan to offer lucrative trade concessions locked indispute.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims struggle to get some gifts given ahead of the Eid Al-Fitr, ending of the fasting month of Ramadan at their relief camp in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims run after the truck distributing aid in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victims raise their hands asking for food being distributed from a truck in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 10, 2010.
    • Getty Images Internally displaced Pakistani children chase a truck spraying water as temperature hit 41 degree celcius at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010.
    • Getty Images An internally displaced Pakistani woman holds a child as people return home past flood waters in Shikarpur on September 8, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Getty Images A flood victim woman stands in a pan as she washes clothes in floodwaters An internally displaced Pakistani young boy bathes in a bucket at a camp while taking refuge on an embankment at a village in Khairpur district, in Sukkur on September 10, 2010. Pakistan's Sindh province September 10, 2010.
    • Getty Images Internally displaced Pakistani children chase a truck spraying water as temperature hit 41 degree celcius at a camp in Sukkur on September 10, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolsterriver defences to save two towns from catastrophe.
    • Getty Images A Pakistani flood victim jumps into the flood water in Johi, Sindh province, on September 9, 2010. More than 10 million people have been without shelter in Pakistan's floods for the past six weeks, the United Nations said September 6, referring to 'one of the worst humanitarian disasters' in its history.
    • Getty Images A Pakistani boy displaced by floods points at submerged buildings in Johi, Sindh province, on September 9, 2010. More than 10 million people have been without shelter in Pakistan's floods for the past six weeks, the United Nations said September 6, referring to 'one of the worst humanitarian disasters' in its history.
    • Getty Images Pakistani navel soldiers rescue flood affected victims from different villages in Khanpor Kali Mori, district Dadu on September 9, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe.
    • Getty Images A Pakistani man displaced by flooding wade through flood water with belongings in Johi, Sindh province, on September 9, 2010. More than 10 million people have been without shelter in Pakistan's floods for the past six weeks, the United Nations said September 6, referring to 'one of the worst humanitarian disasters' in its history.
    • Getty Images Pakistani men affected by flooding sits on beds above the floodwater in Johi, Sindh province, on September 9, 2010.
    • Getty Images A dog is stranded on a broken wall surrounded by floodwater in Johi, Sindh province, on September 9, 2010.
    • Getty Images An elderly Pakistani flood affected villager sits on top of a house in the flood-hit Johi village, district Dadu on September 9, 2010.
    • Getty Images A Pakistani girl affected by flooding is pictured in Johi, Sindh province, on September 9, 2010.
    • Getty Images Pakistani navel soldiers rescue flood affected victims from different villages in Khanpor Kali Mori, district Dadu on September 9, 2010.
    • Getty Images Evacuated Pakistani flood affected villagers women carry their belongings as they arrive in Khanpor Kali Mori, district Dadu on September 9, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim leads his buffalos while taking refuge on an embankment in a village in Khairpur district in Pakistan's Sindh province September 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim wades through the floodwaters with her children as they arrive from their village to higher ground, in Khairpur district in Pakistan's Sindh province September 10, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim family wades through the floodwaters as they arrive from their flooded village in Khairpur district in Pakistan's Sindh province September 10, 2010.
    • AP Photo Pakistani flood survivors wait for food distributed on the occasion of Eid, which ends the fasting month of Ramadan, at a camp set up for displaced
    • A Pakistani young girl (C) stands in a queue with others as they wait for food at a makeshift camp in Sukkur, southern Sindh province on September 8, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO/ AAMIR QURESHI (Photo credit should read AAMIR QURESHI/AFP/Getty Images)
    • AP Photo Pakistani flood-affected people jostle for Eid gifts at a camp set up for displaced people in Nowshera, near Peshawar, Pakistan, Friday, Sept. 10, 2010.
    • AP Photo Pakistani flood affected children scramble to get gifts from women Reuters Pictures volunteers as they prepare to celebrate Eid, which ends the fasting month of Flood victims receive food handouts while taking refuge in a relief camp for Ramadan, at a camp setup for displaced people in Muzaffargarh district, flood victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province September 9, 2010. Punjab province, Pakistan on Thursday, Sept. 9, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures A flood victim prays at a relief camp in Pakistan's Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province September 9, 2010.
    • Reuters Pictures Flood victim Hussain Bux, 70, takes care of his grandchild outside his tent while taking refuge in a relief camp for victims in Sukkur in Pakistan's Sindh province September 9, 2010.)
    • Getty Images An Internally displaced woman sits, waiting for a vehicle as people return to their homes in Shikarpur on September 8, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said Tuesday, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two townsfrom catastrophe.
    • Getty Images An internally displaced Pakistani woman cooks next to a tent on the roadside in Sukkur on September 8, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said Tuesday, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns fromcatastrophe.
    • Pakistani children displaced by floods sit in a queue as they wait for food at a distribution point in a makeshift camp in Sukkur, southern Sindh province on September 8, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe. - Getty Images
    • Getty Images Internally displaced Pakistanis guide their sheep back to their homes in Sukkur on September 8, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said Tuesday, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns fromcatastrophe.
    • Getty Images Pakistanis displaced by floods eat food at a makeshift camp in Dadu district on September 9, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe.
    • Getty Images Internally displaced men receive lunch at a camp in Sukkur on September 9, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed tobolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe.
    • Two internally displaced Pakistani girls peer from the holes of a makeshift tent as children attend class at a camp in Sukkur on September 9, 2010. Pakistan's devastating floods have left 10 million people without shelter, the United Nations said on September 7, as authorities rushed to bolster river defences to save two towns from catastrophe. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / ADEK BERRY (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
    • A list of humanitarian organisations that are accepting cash donations for flood response efforts in Pakistan can be found at http://www.interaction.org/crisis-list/interaction-members-respond-floods-pakistan You can also contribute to flood relief in Pakistan through one of these organizations (listed in alphabetical order): APPNA IMANA Central Asia Institute Islamic Relief USA The Citizens Foundation Medecins sans Frontiere Developments in Literacy Relief International Doctors of The World Red Cross Pakistan Edhi Foundation UNHCR Human Development Foundation SHINE Humanity Humanity First UNICEF   Let’s be HUMAN and not ONLY Human beings… Be generous DONATE to help those in need …
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