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Microsoft® office

  1. 1. [Your company name] presents:<br />Microsoft® Office Visio®2007 Training<br />Shapes: Introductory basics you can’t live without<br />
  2. 2. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Course contents<br /><ul><li>Overview: What’s special about Visio shapes?
  3. 3. Lesson 1: An introduction to shapes
  4. 4. Lesson 2: How to get shapes</li></ul>Each lesson includes a list of suggested tasks and a set of test questions.<br />
  5. 5. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Overview: What’s special about Visio shapes?<br />Shapes are the meat of any Visio diagram. You can use shapes to represent objects, actions, and ideas, and you can arrange and connect shapes to show visual relationships.<br />When shapes don’t look or behave the way you want, your diagram suffers. So mastering shapes basics is key. <br />This course introduces the important concepts behind shapes and then shows you how to get shapes and put them on a page. <br />
  6. 6. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Course goals <br /><ul><li>Identify the two types of Visio shapes: 1-D and 2-D.
  7. 7. See how 1-D shapes and 2-D shapes behave.
  8. 8. Find the shapes you need. </li></li></ul><li>Lesson 1<br />An introduction to shapes<br />
  9. 9. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />An introduction to shapes<br />What is a shape? <br />In Visio, the definition is much broader than you might think. <br />Yes, you can use basic shapes like rectangles and diamonds for a flowchart. But you can also use very detailed shapes. <br />And Visio shapes don’t just sit there and look good. They have interactive behavior as well. Meaning that when you work with them, they react in a certain way.<br />
  10. 10. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Two types of shapes<br />When you work with Visio shapes, you can resize, rotate, format, and move them. <br />But how the shape behaves when you do those things depends on the type of shape. <br />There are two types of shapes in Visio: one-dimensional shapes (1-D shapes) and two-dimensional shapes (2-D shapes).<br />Each type of shape behaves a certain way. When you know what type of shape you’re dealing with, you’ll be able to work with it successfully.<br />
  11. 11. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />1-D shapes<br />A 1-D shape is a shape that, when selected, has a beginning point and an ending point .<br />1-D shapes typically look like lines. <br />How do 1-D shapes behave when you work with them? If you move the beginning point or ending point, only one dimension changes: the length.<br />But the most powerful feature of 1-D shapes is their ability to connect two other shapes. <br />
  12. 12. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />1-D shapes<br />You’re probably thinking, “Wait a minute, these lines don’t look like shapes to me.” <br />It’s true, the word “shape” usually refers to a form or an object that has a distinct outline or boundary. <br />But Visio considers these lines to be shapes and calls them shapes, so getting in that habit now will avoid confusion later.<br />
  13. 13. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />2-D shapes<br />A 2-D shape is a shape that, when selected, does not have a beginning point or an ending point. <br />Instead, a 2-D shape has eight selection handles . <br />How do 2-D shapes behave? When you click and drag a corner selection handle, you can change two dimensions: the length and the width. <br />But you can’t use 2-D shapes to connect other shapes. That function is limited to 1-D shapes.<br />
  14. 14. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />2-D shapes<br />2-D shapes are typically used to represent something, either a general concept such as a step in a flowchart or a specific object such as a factory or a piece of equipment.<br />Like the laptop and the block shown here, some 2-D shapes are drawn to look three-dimensional. <br />Even so, Visio considers these shapes to be 2-D shapes. You know that because of the eight selection handles. <br />
  15. 15. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />1-D or 2-D? How to be sure<br />At first glance, some shapes that look 2-D are really 1-D. And vice versa. <br />To avoid confusion, always select the shape. Visio will tell you what type it is. <br />For example, the arrow shape at the top of this picture appears to be two dimensional because it has thickness. <br />But when you select it, you see its beginning point and its ending point, so it is 1-D for sure. Instead of just representing a concept or an object, this arrow is used to connect other shapes.<br />
  16. 16. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />1-D or 2-D? How to be sure<br />On the other hand, the curve shape appears to be 1-D. After all, it looks like just a line. <br />But when you select it, you see the eight selection handles that tell you it’s 2-D.<br />So this curve represents the concept of a bell-shaped curve of data—but the line that creates the curve cannot connect other shapes.<br />
  17. 17. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Shapes with special behavior<br />All shapes in Visio are either 1-D or 2-D, depending on how they behave. <br />However, some shapes have more behavior that is unique to them and that doesn’t depend on whether they’re 1-D or 2-D. <br />This unique behavior makes these shapes especially handy.<br />
  18. 18. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Shapes with special behavior<br />For example, some shapes have yellow control handles that let you interact with them. <br />In this illustration, the door shape has a control handle that lets you swing the door open and closed. Will it clear the table nearby? <br />It appears not. Better find a smaller table or make other adjustments to the furniture so that this problem doesn’t occur in the real world.<br />
  19. 19. Shapes: Introductory basics you can’t live without<br />Anything is a shape<br />When working with Visio, you’ll probably want to add text, photos, or clip art.<br />So keep in mind that anything is a shape in Visio, including pictures and text. <br />If you type text on an empty part of the page, that text will be a 2-D shape, and it will have eight selection handles when selected. If you select an imported picture, it will have those handles too. <br />Let’s face it: Anything on the page is a shape to Visio, anything. Even if the shape wasn’t created in Visio.<br />
  20. 20. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Suggestions for practice<br />Get familiar with 2-D shape behavior.<br />Get familiar with 1-D shape behavior.<br />Examine the variety of 1-D and 2-D shapes.<br />Explore the special behavior that some shapes have. <br />Online practice (requires Visio 2007)<br />
  21. 21. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 1, question 1<br />How can you identify a 2-D shape in Visio? (Pick one answer.)<br />Select the shape and look for the six green selection handles at the sides of the shape. <br />Select the shape and look for the eight green selection handles at the sides of the shape. <br />If the shape has two dimensions, it’s a 2-D shape. <br />If the shape looks as though it has three dimensions, it’s not 2-D, it’s 3-D. <br />
  22. 22. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 1, question 1: Answer<br />Select the shape and look for the eight green selection handles at the sides of the shape.<br />Many 2-D shapes also have a green rotation handle . <br />
  23. 23. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 1, question 2<br />What’s one good reason to use a 1-D shape? (Pick one answer.)<br />You want a thin border line along the four sides of a drawing page. <br />You want the shape to resemble a spatial object such as a circle, a piece of furniture, or some office equipment. <br />You want the shape to represent an employee in an org chart. <br />You want to connect two shapes. <br />
  24. 24. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 1, question 2: Answer<br />You want to connect two shapes.<br />Connecting two shapes is, in fact, the mainreason you’d use a 1-D shape in Visio. <br />
  25. 25. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 1, question 3<br />If you drag a shape’s yellow control handle , what will happen? (Pick one answer.)<br />The shape will rotate. <br />The shape will exhibit special behavior. <br />The shape will resize to proportionate widths. <br />The shape will move in a straight line so that you can keep it on the same y or x axis. <br />
  26. 26. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 1, question 3: Answer<br />The shape will exhibit special behavior.<br />If a shape has a yellow control handle, you can drag that handle to get additional behavior from the shape. For example, you can swing open a door shape or open a drawer in a file cabinet shape.<br />
  27. 27. Lesson 2<br />How to get shapes<br />
  28. 28. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />How to get shapes<br />In Visio, all the world’s…a shape. <br />And there are hundreds of Visio shapes to choose from, more than you can memorize. <br />So it’s good to know how to find them when you need them. There are six ways to get shapes. <br />While the number of ways to get shapes isn’t as abundant as the number of shapes themselves, six is plenty. That’s because each method is good for a different purpose.<br />
  29. 29. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />You must remember this<br />Before discussing how to get shapes, it’s important that you understand three terms. <br />Shapes window. This window contains stencils.<br />Stencils. Stencils aren’t shapes. That’s important. Stencils contain shapes.<br />Shapes. Shapes, in Visio, are everything. But shapes aren’t stencils. Stencils contain shapes. <br />
  30. 30. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Get shapes with templates<br />One way to get shapes is to choose a template, which is one of the drawing type options you see when you start Visio. <br />Animation: Right-click, and click Play.<br />When you choose a template, the stencils and shapes for that template will appear in the Shapes window, ready to work with.<br />The advantage of using a template is that it provides many related shapes organized for a specific purpose. <br />
  31. 31. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Get shapes with templates<br />One way to get shapes is to choose a template, which is one of the drawing options you see when you start Visio.<br />When you choose a template, the stencils and shapes for that template will appear in the Shapes window, ready to work with.<br />The advantage of using a template is that it provides many related shapes organized for a specific purpose.<br />
  32. 32. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Get shapes by searching<br />If you need more shapes than a template gives you, you can use the Search for Shapes box to search for them. <br />For example, if you’re working on a network diagram, you might want to use a larger arrow than the arrows in the template stencils. <br />
  33. 33. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Get shapes by searching<br />The picture illustrates how you might search for arrow shapes. <br />Type one or two words in the Search for Shapes box, for example, “arrows.” Then press ENTER. <br />Visio creates a temporary stencil to hold the shapes it finds. In this example, that temporary stencil has the name arrows. To use a shape, you’d drag it from the arrows stencil onto your drawing.<br />
  34. 34. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Get shapes by browsing<br />You can also browse for shapes by using the File menu and the Shapes submenu. <br />For example, let’s say that a few weeks ago you used Visio to create a map. You remember using a shape for the airport in the map, and now that shape would be helpful in the flowchart you are making. <br />
  35. 35. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Get shapes by browsing<br />To get that airport shape into the flowchart, you could browse as shown in the picture. <br />The Transportation Shapes stencil would appear in the Shapes window along with your flowchart stencils, and you could drag the airport shape to the page. <br />
  36. 36. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Draw your own shapes<br />If you can’t find the shape you need in Visio, you can always draw your own. <br />Your own shape can be simple or complex, from a wiggly line to a piece of custom office equipment.<br />The tip of the iceberg is the Drawing toolbar, shown here. It lets you create shapes from scratch by using simple tools. <br />
  37. 37. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Get shapes from other people<br />Sometimes other people have made shapes that you want to use—a coworker, say, or a company that makes and sells Visio shapes for certain industries. <br />When you want to use shapes made by others, they could send you a copy of a Visio drawing with those shapes in it. <br />Often, however, what you’ll get is a stencil of shapes. <br />
  38. 38. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Get shapes from other people<br />A stencil is a file with “.vss” or “.vsx” in the file name. <br />For example, a stencil might be called ContosoShapes.vss or ContosoShapes.vsx. <br />When you receive a stencil file, copy it to this location:<br />C:Documents and SettingsusernameMy DocumentsMy Shapes <br />The stencil will then be available when you use the File menu and the Shapes submenu. <br />
  39. 39. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Insert pictures<br />Suppose you’d like to insert a photograph into a diagram. <br />To do that, on the Insert menu, point to Picture and then click From File. (This process is similar to other Office programs you may be familiar with.)<br />When you insert a picture, Visio will automatically make it a 2-D shape and put the eight handles on it.<br />
  40. 40. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Insert pictures<br />Shapes made by inserting pictures aren’t as intelligent as the shapes that come from stencils. As far as interactive behavior goes, they’re not much more than a square on the page. <br />Nonetheless, they are shapes, which means you can connect them with 1-D shapes, resize them, position them, and so on.<br />
  41. 41. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Suggestions for practice<br />Look at the shapes available in a template.<br />Search for a starburst shape.<br />Browse for a shape.<br />Use stencils provided by other people.<br />Insert a picture.<br />Online practice (requires Visio 2007)<br />
  42. 42. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 2, question 1<br />Which of the following is not a way to get shapes? (Pick one answer.)<br />Insert a picture. <br />Choose a template. <br />Choose Import on the Shapes menu. <br />Browse for shapes using the File menu and Shapes submenu. <br />
  43. 43. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 2, question 1: Answer<br />Choose Import on the Shapes menu. <br />This is not one of the ways to get shapes. <br />
  44. 44. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 2, question 2<br />What is a Visio stencil? (Pick one answer.)<br />A collection of shapes available in the Shapes window. <br />A premade shape that you can drag onto a page. <br />A file you can open in Visio that contains an already created drawing. All you have to do is fill in the blanks. <br />A cutout shape that you can fill with any color you want. <br />
  45. 45. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 2, question 2: Answer<br />A collection of shapes available in the Shapes window. <br />Often people think that a Visio stencil is a shape, but it’s not. It’s a group of shapes.<br />
  46. 46. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 2, question 3<br />If someone gave you a .vss or .vsx file, where should you put it so that it is available in Visio? (Pick one answer.)<br />My PicturesMy Visio Shapes <br />My DocumentsMy Shapes <br />On the desktop <br />
  47. 47. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Test 2, question 3: Answer<br />My DocumentsMy Shapes<br />If you put the file here, the stencil will be available in the My Shapes submenu.<br />
  48. 48. Shapes: Introductory basics you can't live without<br />Quick Reference Card<br />For a summary of the tasks covered in this course, view the Quick Reference Card.<br />
  49. 49. USING THIS TEMPLATE<br />See the notes pane or view the full notes page (View tab) for detailed help on this template.<br />

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