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Education is a vital component of any effort to organise action towards a more just society. In the midst of rapid and drastic technology-facilitated shifts in the production and transmission of …

Education is a vital component of any effort to organise action towards a more just society. In the midst of rapid and drastic technology-facilitated shifts in the production and transmission of knowledge that challenge the traditional categories of “teacher” and “learner”, social justice activists are experimenting with ways of incorporating digital media into the educational aspects of their work. Theories and practices of critical pedagogy and popular education can provide a valuable framework by emphasising not only what is radically new in the digital era, but also what tools we already have at hand for the synthesis of political action, education, and media arts. This interactive multimedia presentation looks at innovations coming from popular education practitioners in the United States working on a wide range of social issues, and encourages participants to reflect on the benefit of this work for their own practice in the Australian context.

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  • 1. Digi.Pop.Ed. Dan O’Reilly-Rowe // wolfknuckles@riseup.net // @ghostleg // www.rearleft.wordpress.com
  • 2. introduction
  • 3. (Jenkins 2009) digitisation, ICT networks, media convergence introduction
  • 4. (Jenkins 2009) digitisation, ICT networks, media convergence introduction
  • 5. (Jenkins 2009) digitisation, ICT networks, media convergence new modes of production & consumption introduction
  • 6. (Jenkins 2009) digitisation, ICT networks, media convergence new modes of production & consumption introduction
  • 7. (Jenkins 2009) digitisation, ICT networks, media convergence new modes of production & consumption new literacies introduction
  • 8. (Jenkins 2009) digitisation, ICT networks, media convergence new modes of production & consumption new literacies introduction
  • 9. (Jenkins 2009) digitisation, ICT networks, media convergence new modes of production & consumption new literacies opportunity for new approaches to education introduction
  • 10. (Jenkins 2009) digitisation, ICT networks, media convergence new modes of production & consumption new literacies opportunity for new approaches to education introduction
  • 11. (Jenkins 2009) digitisation, ICT networks, media convergence new modes of production & consumption new literacies opportunity for new approaches to education participatory culture introduction
  • 12. introduction
  • 13. “participatory culture” (Jenkins 2009) introduction
  • 14. “participatory culture” (Jenkins 2009) -technology and media in education not simply about technical training, but about developing new literacies introduction
  • 15. “participatory culture” (Jenkins 2009) -technology and media in education not simply about technical training, but about developing new literacies • pre-digital models for collaborative knowledge production exist in popular education methods introduction
  • 16. “participatory culture” (Jenkins 2009) -technology and media in education not simply about technical training, but about developing new literacies • pre-digital models for collaborative knowledge production exist in popular education methods • opportunity to explore synergy between popular education methodology and digital media and technologies introduction
  • 17. “participatory culture” (Jenkins 2009) -technology and media in education not simply about technical training, but about developing new literacies • pre-digital models for collaborative knowledge production exist in popular education methods • opportunity to explore synergy between popular education methodology and digital media and technologies • potential for action introduction
  • 18. popular education
  • 19. •an approach to teaching and learning oriented towards empowering participants to take actions to address oppressive social conditions popular education
  • 20. •an approach to teaching and learning oriented towards empowering participants to take actions to address oppressive social conditions •opposed to the “banking model” one-to-many transmission of knowledge from teacher to student popular education
  • 21. •an approach to teaching and learning oriented towards empowering participants to take actions to address oppressive social conditions •opposed to the “banking model” one-to-many transmission of knowledge from teacher to student •in pop ed, knowledge is produced collaboratively in dialogue between participants popular education
  • 22. •an approach to teaching and learning oriented towards empowering participants to take actions to address oppressive social conditions •opposed to the “banking model” one-to-many transmission of knowledge from teacher to student •in pop ed, knowledge is produced collaboratively in dialogue between participants •interactive popular education
  • 23. •an approach to teaching and learning oriented towards empowering participants to take actions to address oppressive social conditions •opposed to the “banking model” one-to-many transmission of knowledge from teacher to student •in pop ed, knowledge is produced collaboratively in dialogue between participants •interactive •multimodal popular education
  • 24. •an approach to teaching and learning oriented towards empowering participants to take actions to address oppressive social conditions •opposed to the “banking model” one-to-many transmission of knowledge from teacher to student •in pop ed, knowledge is produced collaboratively in dialogue between participants •interactive •multimodal •personal & political popular education
  • 25. -Paolo Freire Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970)
  • 26. "Education either functions as an instrument which is used to facilitate integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity or it becomes the practice of freedom, the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world." -Paolo Freire Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970)
  • 27. PRAXIS
  • 28. PRAXIS read
  • 29. PRAXIS read write
  • 30. PRAXIS read write rewrite
  • 31. PRAXIS read write rewrite the world
  • 32. digital culture
  • 33. Commonly cited characteristics of digital culture... (see Manovich 2001, Deuze 2006, Ryan 2004, Quiggin 2006, Jenkins 2008) digital culture
  • 34. Commonly cited characteristics of digital culture... (see Manovich 2001, Deuze 2006, Ryan 2004, Quiggin 2006, Jenkins 2008) •participation digital culture
  • 35. Commonly cited characteristics of digital culture... (see Manovich 2001, Deuze 2006, Ryan 2004, Quiggin 2006, Jenkins 2008) •participation •interactivity digital culture
  • 36. Commonly cited characteristics of digital culture... (see Manovich 2001, Deuze 2006, Ryan 2004, Quiggin 2006, Jenkins 2008) •participation •interactivity •collaboration digital culture
  • 37. Commonly cited characteristics of digital culture... (see Manovich 2001, Deuze 2006, Ryan 2004, Quiggin 2006, Jenkins 2008) •participation •multimodality •interactivity •collaboration digital culture
  • 38. Commonly cited characteristics of digital culture... (see Manovich 2001, Deuze 2006, Ryan 2004, Quiggin 2006, Jenkins 2008) •participation •multimodality •interactivity •remediation •collaboration digital culture
  • 39. Commonly cited characteristics of digital culture... (see Manovich 2001, Deuze 2006, Ryan 2004, Quiggin 2006, Jenkins 2008) •participation •multimodality •interactivity •remediation •collaboration •bricolage digital culture
  • 40. are also applicable to popular education: digital popular education
  • 41. are also applicable to popular education: •participation digital popular education
  • 42. are also applicable to popular education: •participation •interactivity digital popular education
  • 43. are also applicable to popular education: •participation •interactivity •collaboration digital popular education
  • 44. are also applicable to popular education: •participation •multimodality •interactivity •collaboration digital popular education
  • 45. are also applicable to popular education: •participation •multimodality •interactivity •remediation •collaboration digital popular education
  • 46. are also applicable to popular education: •participation •multimodality •interactivity •remediation •collaboration •bricolage digital popular education
  • 47. an example:
  • 48. an example: www.buildthewheel.org
  • 49. an example: www.buildthewheel.org
  • 50. i can haz teh internet revolushuns?
  • 51. how does this lead to action? i can haz teh internet revolushuns?
  • 52. how does this lead to action? Weʼre talking about the process of coming together to imagine a different world and a different way of being, and then fighting for that. I think thereʼs limitations to how that can be done, from what Iʼve seen, in the online world. Because itʼs ultimately about building relationships and crossing comfortable areas. Organising, if itʼs being effective, shouldnʼt be too comfortable. Youʼre talking about bringing people together that are being pushed apart... i can haz teh internet revolushuns?
  • 53. how does this lead to action? Weʼre talking about the process of coming together to imagine a different world and a different way of being, and then fighting for that. I think thereʼs limitations to how that can be done, from what Iʼve seen, in the online world. Because itʼs ultimately about building relationships and crossing comfortable areas. Organising, if itʼs being effective, shouldnʼt be too comfortable. Youʼre talking about bringing people together that are being pushed apart... Le Tim Ly - Developer, Build the Wheel i can haz teh internet revolushuns?
  • 54. what’s remains, what’s changed?
  • 55. what’s remains, what’s changed? how else can digital media and tech support education towards action?
  • 56. what’s remains, what’s changed? how else can digital media and tech support education towards action? what are the limits, hazards in using digital tech for popular education?
  • 57. references: Apple, M.W. & Buras, K.L. eds., 2006. The Subaltern Speak: Curriculum, Power, and Educational Struggles, London: Routledge.   Boal, A., 1979. Theatre of the Oppressed, London: Pluto Press.   Bolter, J.D. & Grusin, R.A., 1999. Remediation: Understanding New Media, Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.   Coiro, J. ed., 2008. Handbook of Research on New Literacies, New York: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.   Deuze, M., 2006. Participation, Remediation, Bricolage: Considering Principal Components of a Digital Culture. Information Society, 22(2), pp.63-75.   Freire, P., 1993. Pedagogy of the Oppressed 20th ed., New York: Continuum.   Jenkins, H., 2009. Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century, The MIT Press.   Kincheloe, J.L., 2008. Knowledge and Critical Pedagogy: An Introduction, Dordrecht: Springer.   Lankshear, C. & Knobel, M. eds., 2008. Digital Literacies: Concepts, Policies and Practices, New York: Peter Lang.   Manovich, L., 2001. The Language of New Media, Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.   Quiggin, J., 2006. Blogs, wikis and creative innovation. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 9(4), pp.481-496.   Siemens, R.G., Schreibman, S. & Unsworth, J. eds., 2004. A Companion to Digital Humanities, Malden, MA: Blackwell Pub.