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The American Revolution (part 1)<br />Magdalena Andreoli<br />
Revolutions; Glorious Revolutions<br />The “Glorious Revolutions” was depicted as a spontaneous uprising by a united Engli...
Revolutions; Resolutions<br />As a new monarch, King William III wanted to show his control in England and gather resource...
The Atlantic; News<br />The increase of volume and predictability of shipping improved the flow of transatlantic informati...
The Atlantic; Trade<br />During the eighteenth century, trade between the colonies and Britain became increasingly complex...
Awakenings; Revivals<br />During the 18th century, many Congregational and Presbyterian congregations have evangelical tra...
Awakenings; Legacies<br />Revivals were too emotional to last very long, so the revivalism cooled and the millennial hopes...
The Pacific; Islands<br />The Pacific Ocean was extremely difficult to explore due to the distance between it and Europe a...
The Pacific; Kamehameha<br />In the 18th century, contact with the Hawaiian Islands increases due to its ideal location fo...
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The American Revolution (Part 1)

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Transcript of "The American Revolution (Part 1)"

  1. 1. The American Revolution (part 1)<br />Magdalena Andreoli<br />
  2. 2. Revolutions; Glorious Revolutions<br />The “Glorious Revolutions” was depicted as a spontaneous uprising by a united English people, when in face it was a coup from a foreign power, William, the Dutch Prince of Orange, in a realization that he could acquire King James’ crown due to the King’s arbitrary rulings which created fear among the Protestant majority of a Catholic dynasty.<br />This created chaos in the colonies as the colonial appointees of King James struggled to maintain power.<br />
  3. 3. Revolutions; Resolutions<br />As a new monarch, King William III wanted to show his control in England and gather resources from the colonies for a war against France.<br />These goals called for a strengthening rather then reconstruction of the leadership of the colonies.<br />The colonial office remained relatively untouched, because William III was a pragmatic ruler who understood he needed to compromise with the colonial leaders to keep them from forming discontent that would obstruct William’s desire to unite the colonies for war.<br />
  4. 4. The Atlantic; News<br />The increase of volume and predictability of shipping improved the flow of transatlantic information, preventing the colonies from isolation.<br />This increase of information from the mother country, Britain, and the dependence it created, lead to the development of colonial newspapers.<br />These colonial newspapers consisted of very little local news, it mostly consisted of very little local news, it mostly included advertisements for new imported goods, apprehensions of run-away slaves, and notices of ship schedules.<br />
  5. 5. The Atlantic; Trade<br />During the eighteenth century, trade between the colonies and Britain became increasingly complex as Britain developed a multilateral trading system that used bills of exchange drawn on London merchant firms to balance regional credits and debits, rather then a simple, bilateral trade.<br />
  6. 6. Awakenings; Revivals<br />During the 18th century, many Congregational and Presbyterian congregations have evangelical traditions that nurtured periodic surges in fervor and new members with promises of salvation. These revivals were supposed to emphasis the emotional process of conversation that turned sinners into saints who received eternal salvation.<br />Priest stimulated revivals by preaching sermons to shock listeners into realizing their impending and eternal sentence in hell, by appealing to emotions, especially fear and hope.<br />Side effects of these revivals was sometimes suicide of those who got caught in the stage of despair and couldn’t break through to the New Birth.<br />
  7. 7. Awakenings; Legacies<br />Revivals were too emotional to last very long, so the revivalism cooled and the millennial hopes faded.<br />The newly formed evangelical groups institutionalized or dissolved into normal society.<br />The Great Awakening brought a religious dialectic that attracted seekers while balancing their spiritual hunger with their social longing for respect in it.<br />
  8. 8. The Pacific; Islands<br />The Pacific Ocean was extremely difficult to explore due to the distance between it and Europe and its vastness which made it extremely easy to get lost out at sea, discouraging exploration. So Europeans preoccupied themselves with their closer colonial ventures and for the most part neglected the Pacific Ocean until the 18th century.<br />The discovery of the western route into the Pacific via lead to a trade route between the Philippines and Mexico and the discovery of islands where small settlements could be made to allow the resupplying of trading ships.<br />The French and British became very serious about the exploration in the 18th century in the name of science.<br />
  9. 9. The Pacific; Kamehameha<br />In the 18th century, contact with the Hawaiian Islands increases due to its ideal location for the facilitation of new transpacific trade. So the previously isolated islands became apart of the busy crossroads of the North Pacific.<br />Using the trade as a means to win an arms race to control the islands, Chief Kamehameha forcibly unified the islands of Hawaii and created a monarchy.<br />For a half a century, the Hawaiians adapted well enough to European influences to gain resources while maintaining their independence.<br />
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