Necc in the_news_19_april13

1,105 views
1,022 views

Published on

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,105
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
16
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Necc in the_news_19_april13

  1. 1. 1Navy Expeditionary Combat Command in the News is a service of the NECC Public AffairsOffice and is used to provide senior leadership and interested NECC personnel around the Fleetwith news about the Navy’s expeditionary forces. Please do not repost the Clips to any publiclyaccessible website since we must maintain the integrity of copyrighted material.Friday, April 19, 2013Coastal Riverine Sailors Injured in Training Mishaphttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73373By Navy Expeditionary Combat Command Public AffairsCHARLESTON, S.C. (NNS) – Three Sailors assigned to Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 10were injured in a training accident when their 34-foot patrol boat ran aground near CharlestonHarbor April 13.Navy Divers Recover Sunken Patrol Boathttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73479By EOD Group 2 Public AffairsCHARLESTON, S.C. (NNS) – U.S. Navy Divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit(MDSU) 2 and contracted salvage personnel successfully raised and returned to shore a sunkenpatrol boat (PB 502), April 18.NMCB 15 arrives in Afghanistanhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/105057/nmcb-15-arrives-afghanistanStory by Petty Officer 2nd Class Daniel GarasCAMP LEATHERNECK, Afghanistan – Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile ConstructionBattalion (NMCB) 15, headquartered out of Belton Mo., arrived in Afghanistan earlier in Aprilto support Operation Enduring Freedom.Navy Divers, EOD Promote Science and Aquatic Technology at SeaPerchhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73382By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese, Explosive Ordnance DisposalGroup 2 Public AffairsNEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS) – Local Navy Divers and Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD)technicians supported dozens of middle and high school students in the first Tidewater DistrictNAVY EXPEDITIONARY COMBAT COMMANDIN THE NEWS
  2. 2. 2SeaPerch Challenge held at the aquatics center in the Brittingham-Midtown Community CenterApril 13.Coastal Riverine Group One holds change of commandhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/105295/coastal-riverine-group-one-holds-change-command#ixzz2QoYjxHZeStory by Lt. Cmdr. Donnell EvansIMPERIAL BEACH, Calif. – Capt. Chris Peterschmidt relieved Capt. Eric Moss as commanderof Coastal Riverine Group 1 during a change of command ceremony at Naval Outlying LandingField, Imperial Beach, Calif., April 12.Coastal Riverine Sailors Injured in Training Mishaphttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73373By Navy Expeditionary Combat Command Public AffairsCHARLESTON, S.C. (NNS) – Three Sailors assigned to Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 10were injured in a training accident when their 34-foot patrol boat ran aground near CharlestonHarbor April 13. 

The injured Sailors were transiting the boat into the Charleston Harbor as part of routine trainingwhen the incident occurred at 9:41 p.m. 

The Sailors were transported to the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) where theyare in stable condition.The cause of the incident is under investigation. 

CRS 10 is a Navy Reserve unit based in Jacksonville, Fla. Coastal Riverine Force Sailorsconduct port and harbor security, high value asset protection, offensive combat operations andmaritime security operations in rivers, harbors and coastal waterwaysReturn to Top StoriesNavy Divers Recover Sunken Patrol Boathttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73479By EOD Group 2 Public AffairsCHARLESTON, S.C. (NNS) – U.S. Navy Divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit(MDSU) 2 and contracted salvage personnel successfully raised and returned to shore a sunkenpatrol boat (PB 502), April 18.
  3. 3. 3Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 10, a Navy Reserve unit based in Jacksonville, Fla., wasconducting a routine training event sailing from Jacksonville to Charleston when one of theirpatrol boats transiting into Charleston Harbor ran aground on a jetty on the south side on thechannel entrance at 9:41 p.m., April 13."Salvage operations like this are quite common, we train to respond to all types of incidents fromplanes going down to boats sinking and each one brings up its own unique challenges," saidChief Warrant Officer John Sullivan, MDSU2 operations officer-in-charge of the salvageoperation.The 34-foot patrol boat was surfaced Thursday morning by Navy Divers from approximately 20feet of water and was towed to shore by a contracted salvage company.The 8-person Mobile Diving and Salvage (MDS) Company, MDS Co. 2-4 based in VirginiaBeach, Va., arrived in Charleston Tuesday and worked with local Coast Guard and maritimeofficials to determine how to safely recover the submerged vessel by using another similar patrolboat ashore as a model.MDSU2 Divers then performed a site survey to determine the extent of damage to the vessel. OnWednesday and Thursday Divers installed lift points, placed belly bands on the submergedvessel prior to rigging for lift and recovery, and attached salvage lift bags capable of lifting22,000 pounds. Once secured, the vessel was carefully brought to the surface Thursday morningby the lift bags and checked for stability."I thought my team did outstanding. This is what we train for," said Sullivan. "We developed aplan. We executed it, and I thought my team did outstanding."PB 502 was then towed to the U.S. Coast Guard Station at Tradd Street.Coastal Riverine Group (CRG) 2 is conducting a thorough investigation into the cause of theincident.MDSU 2 is homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base, Little Creek-Ft. Story in Virginia Beach,Va. and has successfully conducted salvage operations to support TWA Flight 800, Swiss AirFlight 111, the space shuttles Challenger and Columbia, the I-35W Mississippi River bridgecollapse in Minnesota, the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor, and recovery of a downed F-16Fighting Falcon off the coast of Italy.Return to Top StoriesNMCB 15 arrives in Afghanistanhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/105057/nmcb-15-arrives-afghanistanStory by Petty Officer 2nd Class Daniel GarasCAMP LEATHERNECK, Afghanistan – Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile ConstructionBattalion (NMCB) 15, headquartered out of Belton Mo., arrived in Afghanistan earlier in April
  4. 4. 4to support Operation Enduring Freedom.As the International Security Assistance Force continues to drawdown, NMCB15, operatingunder the recently coined name “Task Force True Grit”, is spearheading engineering retrogradeoperations.“We just won’t be in one forward operating base,” said Commander Anthony Spinler, NMCB15’s Commanding Officer. “Whether it is a squad of twelve or a large detachment of 100 ormore, we tailor ourselves to the task at hand. That’s one of the things that make Seabees unique.”Upon mission tasking, the Operations Department task tailors’ each project into detachments bysupported commander priority, deploying to locations throughout the area of operations tosupport a wide-variety of engineering operations.Spinler added that this deployment will be different from a standard one in that the number oftasks is greater and that Seabees will be continuously formed into new teams.“The missions are a lot shorter,” said Spinler. “They may only be on a job for two weeks beforethey return and then reorganize into a new build-team.”“I think this deployment will be exciting,” said Construction Mechanic 1st Class Justin Bohaty.“The opportunity to work on many jobs with different people will break-up the monotony andavoid complacency.”While deployed, NMCB 15 will be tasked with completing numerous projects in support ofOperation Enduring Freedom, including the drilling of water-wells, camp maintenance andvarious deconstruction projects.NMCB 15 is currently deployed as part of the joint U.S. Theater Engineer Brigade inAfghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and is an expeditionary engineeringelement of U.S. Naval forces supporting units worldwide through national force readiness,humanitarian assistance, and building and maintaining infrastructure.Return to Top StoriesNavy Divers, EOD Promote Science and Aquatic Technology at SeaPerchhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73382By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese, Explosive Ordnance DisposalGroup 2 Public AffairsNEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS) – Local Navy Divers and Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD)technicians supported dozens of middle and high school students in the first Tidewater DistrictSeaPerch Challenge held at the aquatics center in the Brittingham-Midtown Community CenterApril 13.
  5. 5. 5The SeaPerch Challenge is a one-day design competition featuring student-assembled remotelyoperated vehicles (ROVs) with teams of two to four students working together to build, test,launch, and compete their ROV in the challenge.U.S. Navy Divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 helped setup and providetechnical assistance during the competition, which was judged by volunteers from the U.S. Navy,Newport News Shipbuilding and Old Dominion University."This is great for the kids because they get to use their minds and creativity to overcome thechallenges of building their own ROVs," said Navy Diver 2nd Class Shaun Krall, assigned toMDSU 2. "We use ROVs for everything from underwater ships husbandry to safely observingunderwater mines. This is great for us too because we can look at what the future of thistechnology might look like."Technicians from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 2 Det. Yorktown werealso on hand to demonstrate the capabilities of the SeaBotix underwater reconnaissance vehicleand answer questions about some of the practical applications for the technologies showcasedduring the event."I think its big for our community to be involved, because we use robotics like these a lot so tohave students able to see what theyre working toward is a great opportunity for everyone," saidLt. Jacob Loeffler, officer in charge assigned to EODMU 2 Det. Yorktown. "Its great to seeschool systems investing in these programs."The engineering and science competition featured a poster competition and a technical watercompetition. During the poster competition, students introduced their graphic displays anddelivered oral presentations about their design philosophy and construction challenges, andanswered questions posed by the judges. During the technical water competition, teamsparticipated in two timed pool competitions featuring an obstacle course and a deep waterretrieval course.The SeaPerch Program provides students with an opportunity to learn about science, technology,engineering, and mathematics (STEM) while building an underwater ROV. Throughout theproject, students learn engineering concepts, problem solving, teamwork, and technicalapplications.MDSU 2 is an expeditionary mobile diving unit homeported aboard Joint Expeditionary Base,Little Creek-Ft. Story in Virginia Beach, Va., and has successfully conducted salvage operationsto support TWA Flight 800, Swiss Air Flight 111, the space shuttles Challenger and Columbia,and the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor.EODMU 2 provides operational explosive ordnance disposal capability for the location,identification, rendering safe, recovery, field evaluation and disposal of all explosive ordnance,including chemical and nuclear weapons.
  6. 6. 6U.S. Navy EOD is the worlds premier combat force for countering explosive hazards andconducting expeditionary diving and salvage.Return to Top StoriesCoastal Riverine Group One holds change of commandhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/105295/coastal-riverine-group-one-holds-change-command#ixzz2QoYjxHZeStory by Lt.Cmdr. Donnell EvansIMPERIAL BEACH, Calif. - Capt. Chris Peterschmidt relieved Capt. Eric Moss as commanderof Coastal Riverine Group 1 during a change of command ceremony at Naval Outlying LandingField, Imperial Beach, Calif., April 12.Moss assumed command of CRG 1, previously titled Maritime Expeditionary Security Group 1,in July 2011."Not a day has gone by during my tour, where I didnt realize and take a moment and think, thatthere was a Coastal Riverine Group 1 sailor on duty, and in harms way, somewhere in theworld," said Moss. "And it was that sailor who guided my own resolve to raise the bar on theheadquarters staff to execute our man, train and equip mission to the fullest effectivenesspossible."Moss is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy and was commissioned an ensign in1983. Moss will retire after serving 34 years in the Navy.Peterschmidt is a graduate of Marquette University and was commissioned an ensign in 1987. Hepreviously served as Commander, Littoral Ship Squadron One and was directly involved indeploying littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS-1) on her first Western Pacific deployment toSingapore in March of 2013."Im excited to be joining this professional group of sailors and leading them in dynamic andvital mission sets that are important to our Navy and nation," said Peterschmidt. "Havingsurvived a waterborne improvised explosive attack, I fully understand the nature of the threatthat we face today and how this command can serve to prevent such attacks again in the future."Coastal Riverine Force operates in harbors, rivers, bays, across the littorals and ashore. Theprimary mission of CRF is to conduct maritime security operations across all phases of militaryoperations by defending high value assets, critical maritime infrastructure, ports and harbors bothinland and on coastal waterways against enemies and when commanded conduct offensivecombat operations.Return to Top Stories

×