Necc in the_news_05_april13

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Necc in the_news_05_april13

  1. 1. NAVY EXPEDITIONARY COMBAT COMMAND IN THE NEWS Navy Expeditionary Combat Command in the News is a service of the NECC Public AffairsOffice and is used to provide senior leadership and interested NECC personnel around the Fleetwith news about the Navy’s expeditionary forces. Please do not repost the Clips to any publicly accessible website since we must maintain the integrity of copyrighted material. Friday, April 5, 2013Navy EOD, Divers Promote Science, Technology with Local Studentshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72919By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese, Explosive Ordnance DisposalGroup Two Public AffairsPORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- Sailors from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit(EODMU) 6 and Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 participated in the PortsmouthPublic Schools Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) day held atWoodrow Wilson High School, March 23.ECRC Sailor Receives Purple Hearthttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73010By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class James C. Brown, Expeditionary Combat ReadinessCenter Public AffairsSILVERDALE, Wash. (NNS) -- Commander, Navy Region Northwest (NRNW) awarded aPurple Heart medal to a former Expeditionary Combat Readiness Center (ECRC) Sailor during aceremony in Silverdale, Wash., March 18.Seabee invited to White Househttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73143By Daryl C. Smith, 1st Naval Construction DivisionVIRGINIA BEACH, VA. (NNS) -- After submitting his application for U.S. citizenship andcompleting the required exam, Equipment Operator Constructionman Recruit (EOCR) Jiang Liuhad been waiting for months for the official notification that he was ready to take the oath ofallegiance and become a U.S. citizen.Seabees Work to Improve Maritime Response With Partners in Guatemalahttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72888From 4th Fleet Public AffairsKAIBIL, Guatemala (NNS) -- Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 (CBMU 202)deployed to Guatemala today in support of Southern Partnership Station 2013 (SPS), a 4th Fleetmission to strengthen regional civil and maritime capabilities, supporting a Drug EnforcementAgency (DEA) initiative to improve maritime response. 1
  2. 2. 84th Engineer Battalion conducts Emergency Deployment Readiness Exercisehttp://www.army.mil/article/99544/84th_Engineer_Battalion_conducts_Emergency_Deployment_Readiness_Exercise/By 2nd Lt. Jennifer Fulco, 8th Theater Sustainment CommandCAMP COVINGTON, Guam (March 26, 2013) -- Staying on top of their training and beingalways prepared, the Forward Support Company, 84th Engineer Battalion, 130th EngineerBrigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, conducted a 48-hour Emergency DeploymentReadiness Exercise during their deployment at Camp Covington, Naval Base Guam.Face of Defense: Seabee Enjoys Independence His Job Provideshttp://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=119607By Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Kegan E. Kay, Naval Air Facility AtsugiNAVAL AIR FACILITY ATSUGI, Japan , March 22, 2013 – After graduating from high schoolin his hometown of East Rockaway, N.J., Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class John Skoblicki worked inconstruction. Now, he’s a builder in the Seabees.US-Philippine engineers reach major milestone in footbridge constructionhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/104591/us-philippine-engineers-reach-major-milestone-footbridge-constructionBy Petty Officer 1st Class Chris FaheySAN PASCUAL, Philippines - Philippine and U.S. Seabees reached a major milestone duringconstruction of the San Pascual footbridge, March 28.Seabees Celebrate Three Years Free of ARIhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73176By Engineering Aide Constructionman Kerby CangeBangor, WA (NNS) -- The Seabees of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 303Detachment Bangor, Wash., March 27 celebrated the anniversary of three consecutive years freefrom alcohol-related incidents (ARI), which is in line with the April 1 kick-off of the Navysprogram "Keep What Youve Earned."Navy EOD, Divers Promote Science, Technology with Local Studentshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72919By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese, Explosive Ordnance DisposalGroup Two Public AffairsPORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- Sailors from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit(EODMU) 6 and Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 participated in the PortsmouthPublic Schools Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) day held at 2
  3. 3. Woodrow Wilson High School, March 23.Explosive Ordnance Disposalman 3rd Class John Ludden from EODMU 6 and Navy Diver 1stClass Frank Horn from MDSU 2 encouraged students and teachers to pursue an interest in thescience and technology fields and provided a hands-on experience of their equipment todemonstrate real-world applications of STEM fields."Its important for the Navy to show everyone what we are all about. It helps make people awareof us, and they learn a little about our community and what we do," said Horn. "I like getting thechance to show our appreciation by taking the time to show them who we are."In addition to the MK II Talon robot and the PackBot transportable robotic system, Navy EODtechnicians and Navy Divers also brought night vision goggles and Navy dive equipmentincluding the SEABOTIX underwater reconnaissance vehicle during this years demonstration.STEM education offers the students and teachers of Portsmouth Public Schools opportunities toapply Virginias Standards of Learning for Science and Mathematics using current technologiesoften with an engineering focus."The STEM Pathways Program begins in grade 4 and continues through our high schoolcourses," said Laura Nelson, director of science education for Portsmouth Public Schools. "Thecoursework was developed to reflect the workforce in these areas: allied health andbiotechnology, environmental science, and modeling and simulation with geographicalinformation systems and robotics."While the demand for science and technology jobs is increasing, the supply of qualifiedcandidates is not. Programs like STEM day aim to stimulate interest in science and technologyjobs, which is vital to American competitiveness in an increasingly knowledge-based economy."I believe that Portsmouth Public Schools realizes this disparity and for the last 10 plus years hasworked to make our motto, Dreams plus Action = Reality, a true reality for our students," saidNelson. "We are sending young men and women into the world who are able to critically thinkand problem solve, are creative, know how to collaborate and can communicate to a variety ofstakeholders."Navy Sailors provided Portsmouth Public Schools expertise in the STEM fields bringingpractical examples for many teachers. However, its the children who benefited most whoobserved STEM fields is not just theories and concepts but has practical uses."I am thankful to have the U.S. Navy involved," said Nelson. "It brings a sense of reality to theSTEM Pathways Program."MDSU 2 is an expeditionary mobile diving unit homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base, LittleCreek-Ft. Story in Virginia Beach, Va. and has successfully conducted salvage operations tosupport TWA Flight 800, Swiss Air Flight 111, the space shuttles Challenger and Columbia andthe Civil War ironclad USS Monitor. 3
  4. 4. EODMU 2 provides operational explosive ordnance disposal capability for the location,identification, rendering safe, recovery, field evaluation and disposal of all explosive ordnance,including chemical and nuclear weapons.U.S. Navy EOD is the worlds premier combat force for countering explosive hazards andconducting expeditionary diving and salvage. Return to Top StoriesECRC Sailor Receives Purple Hearthttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73010By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class James C. Brown, Expeditionary Combat ReadinessCenter Public AffairsSILVERDALE, Wash. (NNS) -- Commander, Navy Region Northwest (NRNW) awarded aPurple Heart medal to a former Expeditionary Combat Readiness Center (ECRC) Sailor during aceremony in Silverdale, Wash., March 18.Rear Adm. Markham Rich, commander, NRNW presented the award to Lt. Cmdr. Robert Moranfor his heroic and meritorious achievements while serving as an Individual Augmentee inAfghanistan during 2011.While assigned to NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan/Combined Security TransitionCommand, Oct. 26, 2011, the twenty-three year Navy veteran was traveling through the TangiValley, Wardak Province, Afghanistan in a convoy of three vehicles when the group wasengaged by the enemy. Multiple rocket propelled grenades (RPGs) struck the vehicles causingthe loss of the rear Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle. A subsequent improvisedexplosive device (IED) blast disabled Morans vehicle at which point the occupants engaged theenemy.With his M4 in hand, Moran exited his disabled vehicle, recognized armed insurgents andprovided suppressive fire while facing incoming enemy action. The group helped in getting theinjured service members in the rear MRAP to the safety of the sole operational vehicle withMoran single handedly carrying one injured service member from danger. RPG fire and the IEDleft Moran injured.When asked about his experience, Moran, now serving as the commanding officer of TransientPersonnel Unit Puget Sound, was quick to note that his injuries were minor and that mostmembers of the convoy suffered much more significant injuries including shrapnel wounds andbroken limbs. Reflecting on the encounter and his time in theatre, Moran said he felt his servicein Afghanistan gave him, "the honor and privilege to serve with service members not only fromother U.S. service components, but also from numerous NATO nations."Exemplifying the Navys core values, Moran was recognized by the U.S. Army with the ArmyCommendation Medal with Valor and the Army Combat Action Badge. Moran was also awarded 4
  5. 5. the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the NATO Medal and the Afghanistan CampaignMedal. Return to Top StoriesSeabee invited to White Househttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73143By Daryl C. Smith, 1st Naval Construction DivisionVIRGINIA BEACH, VA. (NNS) -- After submitting his application for U.S. citizenship andcompleting the required exam, Equipment Operator Constructionman Recruit (EOCR) Jiang Liuhad been waiting for months for the official notification that he was ready to take the oath ofallegiance and become a U.S. citizen.When the call finally came, it was coupled with a very special surprise -- an invitation to theWhite House to receive the oath and meet the President.A member of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202, based at JointExpeditionary Base Little Creek/Fort Story in Virginia Beach, Liu was one of 28 people from 26countries invited to take part in the naturalization ceremony in the White House. He was one of13 active duty service members participating."At first I was nervous. Then I was excited," he said.Born in China, Liu immigrated to the U.S. six years ago with his parents, who now live in SanFrancisco. When he called them to tell them of the White House invitation, he said they werevery happy and very proud.His road to citizenship began when he enlisted in the Navy. He said that he was given the choiceof various specialties, but Equipment Operator was the most interesting choice, so he joined theNavy. He completed "A" School at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., and was assigned to CBMU 202.Fellow Seabees there supported Lius quest for U.S. citizenship by helping him study topics suchas language, U.S. history and government and prepare for his exam after working hours. Hisbiggest supporter was his immediate supervisor, Equipment Operator 2nd Class BenjaminMorrow. He noted that Lius paperwork had been delayed because the Office of HomelandSecurity mistakenly sent it to Mississippi instead of Virginia, but if the delay had not happened,he would not have had the opportunity to go to the White House.Because the phone call came on a Thursday, and the ceremony was the following Mondaymorning, CBMU 202 had to work fast to make arrangements for him to attend."This command made it a priority to get him up there," Morrow said.Due to the short fuse, only one member of the unit could accompany him, and that was Morrow.Morrow made it a point to show Liu as many landmarks as possible when they arrived. 5
  6. 6. "We went to museums, the Vietnam Memorial, Navy Memorial and Lincoln Memorial," Liusaid.The next day, the 28 participants gathered in the White Houses East Room, and the oath ofallegiance was administered by Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano. President Obamashook each participants hand and posed with them for photos.During his remarks, President Obama said, "In each of you, we see the true spirit of America.And we see a bit of ourselves, too, because most of our stories trace back to moments just likethis one ... to an ancestor who, ... like the men and women here today, raised their right hand andrecited that sacred oath."Noting the military members present, he said, "...every member of the military with us hasshown incredible patriotism -- a willingness to risk their lives in defense of a nation that was notyet their own. And thats a remarkable act, and it made each of them one of us. It made each ofthem in some ways American, even before it was official, because that kind of service andsacrifice has defined our nation for more than two centuries." Return to Top StoriesSeabees Work to Improve Maritime Response With Partners in Guatemalahttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=72888From 4th Fleet Public AffairsKAIBIL, Guatemala (NNS) -- Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 (CBMU 202)deployed to Guatemala today in support of Southern Partnership Station 2013 (SPS), a 4th Fleetmission to strengthen regional civil and maritime capabilities, supporting a Drug EnforcementAgency (DEA) initiative to improve maritime response.Seabees laid 14-cubic yards of cement and upgraded the fast-response launch and maintenancecapabilities of Forces Especiales Naval (FEN) Base Kaibil.According to DEA agent in charge of maritime interdiction in Guatemala, the upgrades areessential and highlight the important skill set of U.S. Navy Seabees."We rely on the FEN to carry out our maritime drug interdictions," he said. "The previous (boat)ramp was hindering their quick response abilities. The SeaBees bring resources and capabilitiesunavailable (here). We need their expertise to ensure we can accomplish the mission."The Seabees augmented the FENs abilities by expanding their primary boat ramp."Were placing a reinforced concrete pad to simplify their launching procedures," said SteelWorker 1st Class Martin DeHaven. "Right now, theyre primarily using gravel, and itsinefficient. What were doing will allow them to improve their quick response times."Another important aspect of quick-response missions is maintenance, and the SeaBees are taking 6
  7. 7. steps to improve that requirement as well."Were also placing a pad in preparation for a 110-square-foot storage edifice," added DeHaven."The building will give them a place to store their boat motors and equipment, ultimatelyextending their motor life and reducing maintenance costs."The work the Seabees are accomplishing benefits them just as much as the Guatemalan FEN."This provides us the avenues necessary to train our younger Seabees in a deployedenvironment," said Chief Nick Whitbeck, CBMU 202 officer in charge. "Also, as a unit, we canexercise and quality-check our deployment execution."What the Seabees do while deployed in support of operations such as SPS allows them to buildrelationships and expand global awareness."We (Seabees) are known worldwide as a self-sustainable engineering force," Whitbeck said."When we do missions with partner nations, it helps expand our global presence."COMUSNAVSO/COMFOURTHFLT supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combinedfull-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward presence to ensurefreedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationshipswith international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhanceregional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central andSouth American regions. Return to Top Stories84th Engineer Battalion conducts Emergency Deployment Readiness Exercisehttp://www.army.mil/article/99544/84th_Engineer_Battalion_conducts_Emergency_Deployment_Readiness_Exercise/By 2nd Lt. Jennifer Fulco, 8th Theater Sustainment CommandCAMP COVINGTON, Guam (March 26, 2013) -- Staying on top of their training and beingalways prepared, the Forward Support Company, 84th Engineer Battalion, 130th EngineerBrigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, conducted a 48-hour Emergency DeploymentReadiness Exercise during their deployment at Camp Covington, Naval Base Guam.The purpose of the training was to prepare the battalion for an emergency mount-out to aid indisaster relief in the Pacific region. The Emergency Deployment Readiness Exercise, or EDRE,is a 48-hour drill that tests a units ability to prepare equipment and personnel required to respondto an emergency disaster.The Forward Support Co., or Alpha Company, as well as other companies within the battalion,had to adjust and learn new systems. Ever since arriving to Guam in January, the battalion hasworked closely with the Navy Seabees from the Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Five tolearn the units processes, which are drastically different then the Armys. 7
  8. 8. The EDRE exercise was designed for a Seabee Battalion which is configured differently than anArmy engineer battalion. Despite the services differences, the two jointly accomplished themission.The Seabees have taught and trained multiple Soldiers and sections, creating a remarkable jointenvironment."Although the execution of the Emergency Deployment Readiness Exercise was very differentfrom how the Navy conducts it, the end state remained the same," Lt. Brendan Bunn, the officerin charge of the NMCB 5. "Both the Navy and the Army worked extremely hard and gainedtraining and knowledge from this experience."Alpha Co. consists of logistical sections that focus on maintenance, transportation andembarkations. Maintenance was required to perform technical inspections on each piece ofequipment. The transportation section was required to wash, stage, and load vehicles ontotrailers, and the last station, the embarkation team, was responsible for the weighing and markingof vehicles. Tracking this information was crucial because the documentation was given to theAir Force to ensure the right amount of equipment was being loaded onto aircraft.At 3 A.M. on the day of the exercise, the battalion alerted its key leaders and began the processas if it were a real situation. Alpha Co. alerted their sections and began the set-up process forvehicles and equipment to pass through. Teamwork across the board was essential to the successof this practice exercise as many moving pieces had to come together."This is a great learning experience," said Staff Sgt. Danielle Quimbley, platoon sergeant andembark supervisor for the Distribution Platoon in Alpha Co. "Soldiers and leaders are able togauge their capabilities as well as their shortcomings. This exercise will provide positivefeedback that will allow the company to improve and make the process better in the future."By the end of the exercise, Alpha Co. processed more than 45 pieces of equipment and palletizedmore than 20 containers. The overall goal was met by working day and night and getting all theequipment on the priority list through multiple processes."The company was able to get a better understanding and feel for what was needed to conduct anemergency mount out," said 1st Sgt. Pete Leao of Alpha Company. "Our main objective is topush out all the equipment safely and in a timely manner to be able support the operations aidingthe emergency situation. We will continue to prepare and always be ready for if and when anemergency does occur in the Pacific." 8
  9. 9. The overall exercise met the intent of establishing what was required of the battalion in Guam. Inaddition, every section of the battalion was able to see the areas needing improvement.Conducting the exercise gave the 84th Engineer Battalion a great opportunity to train, improveunit readiness, and understand the overall mission in the Pacific. Undoubtedly, the 84th EngineerBattalion will be fully capable of performing its duties in the event of any emergency event. Return to Top StoriesFace of Defense: Seabee Enjoys Independence His Job Provideshttp://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=119607By Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Kegan E. Kay, Naval Air Facility AtsugiNAVAL AIR FACILITY ATSUGI, Japan , March 22, 2013 – After graduating from high schoolin his hometown of East Rockaway, N.J., Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class John Skoblicki worked inconstruction. Now, he’s a builder in the Seabees.“I joined because of a lot of reasons,” Skoblicki said. “The biggest thing I wanted was a stablejob.”A builder is one of seven construction specialty rates that make up the Seabees. Skoblicki saidhis experience so far differs from those of sailors who have been in the Navy longer than his twoyears of service, as they tend to work on larger projects. His work here consists primarily ofcarpentry, sanding, painting, staining and small building projects, he said.“What a [builder] does in the Seabees is rough carpentry -- throwing up buildings and doingconcrete pads,” he explained. “My favorite part of my job is probably that I’m in my own littleworld back there. I have a lot of independence. I can kind of do what I want to do, and I guessthat is what motivates me.”Navy Lt. Cmdr. Jeffrey Sherwood, the public works officer here, said Skoblicki is a solidperformer.“He assists tenant base commands with various technical knowledge and hands-on guidance inmultiple aspects of carpentry,” he said, adding that Skoblicki is customer-focused and heads thebase’s self-help program, in which base personnel improve their work spaces.Skoblicki’s recent self-help projects have included the design and assembly of two computerdesks, traditional Japanese Tori gates, picture frames, shadow boxes and 12 ornamental Torigates for the 2013 Seabee Ball, Sherwood said.“[He] is a motivated Seabee who gives his best in all endeavors,” he added. “[He is] perpetuallyoptimistic and energetic, and cheerfully attacks and completes all tasks.”Skoblicki recently was named Sailor of the Week, an honor that includes being guest host of thebase’s weekly show, "Captain’s Call," and showing Navy Capt. Steven Wieman, the naval airfacility’s commanding officer, and Command Master Chief Petty Officer Carlton Duncan aroundhis work center on the program. 9
  10. 10. It’s not the final product that he enjoys the most about his work, Skoblicki said, but rather, it’sthe process of creating the product.“For me, it is relaxing,” he said. “If you know going into it that you are going to mess it up alittle bit, and that your end product is probably going be at least a little bit different from whatyou originally planned one way or another, it is no big deal. Patience is probably the biggestthing, the most important thing, when you are doing finish work like that.”For Skoblicki, wood working has become a hobby, and he stays late at work teaching himselfhow to create different products with the machines and tools.“Everything is a learning experience, whether you learn the right way or the wrong way,” hesaid. “You learn what to do or what not to do. Just observe and try to pick up on the right thingsand try to learn from the wrong things, others’ mistakes and your own mistakes.”Skoblicki’s work here has extended past the base’s borders. He and other Seabees assisted inrebuilding houses destroyed by the March 2011 tsunami in the Fukushima prefecture, and heserved a five-week stint in Diego Garcia, an island in the Indian Ocean.“The ocean every day, the weather, fishing -- I like being outside, so Diego Garcia wasawesome,” he said.Skoblicki said he hopes that his next duty assignment will be to a construction battalion inCalifornia or a command in Europe. “I want to travel,” he added. “I never traveled before theNavy.” Return to Top StoriesUS-Philippine engineers reach major milestone in footbridge constructionhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/104591/us-philippine-engineers-reach-major-milestone-footbridge-constructionBy Petty Officer 1st Class Chris FaheySAN PASCUAL, Philippines - Philippine and U.S. Seabees reached a major milestone duringconstruction of the San Pascual footbridge, March 28.Using steal reinforced concrete, the Seabee team laid the primary support blocks for the mainsuspension cables - completing the footbridge’s anchoring system.“Now that we have the anchor set, we need to let the concrete dry for the next seven days or so,”said San Pascual Construction Supervisor Chief Builder Courtland Sawyer attached to NavalMobile Construction Battalion 5. “This is a big step because it means we have a solid foundation.Now, we can work on the tiers leading up to the main support cable. After that, we’ll start thesuspension work.” 10
  11. 11. According to the Joint Civil Military Operations Task Force operations chief, laying thefootbridge’s anchor marks roughly 30 percent completion of the footbridge.“The anchor system is a critical piece of the footbridge,” said JCMOTF Operations Chief MasterChief Constructionman Alonso Cadena. “It endures the stress from the suspension cables. Onceit’s done correctly and good-to-go, then we can proceed to finish the job off with a strong senseof confidence.”To honor their achievement, the Philippine-U.S. Seabees held a traditional, celebratory “lechon”or pig roast. The event offered the team a chance to reflect on best practices, shared ideas and getto know each other in a more relaxed setting.According to Sawyer, relaxing with the Philippine Seabees and enjoying their company during aculturally significant event, opened the team up and created a stronger friendship.“I’m glad we got to spend some time together off the clock,” said Sawyer. “On the site, we kidaround and joke with each other, but we are also one hundred percent focused. It’s all work. Weneeded this time to really bond, talk and gain a better understanding of each other. I’m excited tostart the phase of construction.”The footbridge was one of eight engineering civic action projects being performed byCombined/Joint Civil Military Operations Task Force units in support of exercise Balikatan2013.Balikatan is an annual Philippine-U.S. bilateral exercise. Humanitarian assistance and trainingactivities enable the Philippine and American service members to build lasting relationships,train together and provide assistance in communities where the need is the greatest. Return to Top StoriesSeabees Celebrate Three Years Free of ARIhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73176By Engineering Aide Constructionman Kerby CangeBangor, WA (NNS) -- The Seabees of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 303Detachment Bangor, Wash., March 27 celebrated the anniversary of three consecutive years freefrom alcohol-related incidents (ARI), which is inline with the April 1 kick-off of the Navysprogram "Keep What Youve Earned.""Keep What Youve Earned," a new campaign in honor of National Alcohol Awareness Month,is designed to encourage responsible drinking among Sailors by focusing on theaccomplishments in their Navy careers.Three years ago, the Bees from CBMU 303, Det Bangor received the news that one of their ownwas a victim of alcohol abuse. The information served as an eye-opener for them, said SeniorChief Builder John Scroggs, CBMU 303 Det Bangor officer in charge. The reaction to the news 11
  12. 12. was swift: training on responsible use occurred, the level of trust and mutual care was raised, andthe bonds of Shipmates were strengthened. The Seabees made a commitment to each other, anddecided to apply their iconic motto "CAN DO" to all aspects of their lives.That was the last time an ARI occurred, added Scroggs.Scroggs acknowledged that such success could not have been achieved without an extremelygood group of people."I am not the one who has kept the streak going, they are the ones that keep it going" he said.Several important factors contributed to this achievement. The units training department did anintensified training sessions and developed efficient ways to get the message across.Engineering Aide 1st Class Michael Milton, who served as both the Drug and Alcohol ProgramAdvisor, and the Training Officer at the time, said it was all about intrusive leadership."We encouraged everyone to be involved and be responsible, starting at the fire team level," saidMilton. "The leadership team played a crucial role in this accomplishment by being available tothe junior troops, mentoring, and being supportive."Chief Builder Kimberly Gibson, assistant officer in charge said she often get asked what themagic is in Bangor and she tells them they arent doing anything different than the rest of theNavy."We have phone cards and taxi cards, and we talk about having a plan just like everyone else,"said Gibson. "Our success comes from the strength of character of the men and women whoserve here, and the trust that the First Class Petty Officers have earned from their Sailors. Its onething to say call me if you need help and quite another to develop the relationship that fostersthe trust and confidence that makes a person dial the phone."At the heart of this streak are the Sailors. The Seabees concentrate on taking care of each other,and monitoring one another, said Yeoman 1st Class Timothy Karr."We end every liberty brief with our AOICs expectations of: be safe, be smart, and take care ofeach other," said Karr. "Its as simple as that. Every person here knows that somebody will comehelp them if they ask for it.""Its just awesome to be part of this," said Builder 3rd Class Andru Dunford, who reported toBangor in January. "It makes me proud to be part of this unit, and want to work to keep thestreak going," he said. Return to Top Stories 12

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