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    Necc in the_news_07_feb13 Necc in the_news_07_feb13 Document Transcript

    • NAVY EXPEDITIONARY COMBAT COMMAND IN THE NEWS Navy Expeditionary Combat Command in the News is a service of the NECC Public AffairsOffice and is used to provide senior leadership and interested NECC personnel around the Fleetwith news about the Navy’s expeditionary forces. Please do not repost the Clips to any publicly accessible website since we must maintain the integrity of copyrighted material. Friday, February 8, 2013 _________________________________________________________________NMCB 74 Turns Over Camp Covington to Army’s 84th Engineer BattalionBy Shaina Marie Santos, Joint Region Marianas Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71602SANTA RITA, Guam (NNS) -- Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 74 turned overcontrol of Camp Covington Jan. 17 to the Armys 84th Engineer Battalion (EN BN) during achange of charge ceremony at the camp on U.S. Naval Base Guam.NAVFAC Far East commander visits NMCB 5 Det. Diego Garciahttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/101041/navfac-far-east-commander-visits-nmcb-5-det-diego-garcia#ixzz2K2m0dbeiby Construction Electrician 1st Class Jason Bridwell, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5Public AffairsDIEGO GARCIA, U.K. - The commander of Navy Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC)Far East, Capt. Don Chandler, visited Diego Garcia to tour sites with the new contractor G4SSan Juan during a major contract renewal the week of Jan. 15. During his visit, he held aluncheon lunch with all of the Seabees currently on the island. These included: Public Works,Self Help, and Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalions 5 and 74.NMCB 15 Leaders Participate in Convoy Simulator TrainingBy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Garas, Naval Mobile ConstructionBattalion 15 Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71698GULFPORT, Miss (NNS) -- Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB)15,based in Belton, Mo., participated in convoy simulator training Jan. 24.NMCB 3 Targets Confidence During Weapons TrainingBy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Chris Fahey, Naval MobileConstruction Battalion 3 Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71853PASO ROBLES, Calif. (NNS) -- Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3completed a vital step in deployment preparation, Jan. 30, after qualifying on five differentcombat weapons systems. 1
    • NMCB 11 Awarded Battle “E” for FY2012By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jonathan Carmichael, Naval Mobile ConstructionBattalion 11 Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71823GULFPORT, Miss. (NNS) -- Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 was the activecomponent awarded the Atlantic Fleet Naval Construction Force (NCF) Battle Efficiency (Battle"E") award for fiscal year 2012.NMCB 5’s CCAD Philippines renovates Aplaya elementary school buildingby Construction Electrician Constructionman Quennie May Bumatay, Naval MobileConstruction Battalion 5 Public Affairshttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/101208/nmcb-5s-ccad-philippines-renovates-aplaya-elementary-school-building#ixzz2K2pxgRVYPUERTO PRINCESA, Philippines - Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 arerenovating a building for the Aplaya Elementary School as part of a Construction Civic ActivityDetail in Barangay Tagburos, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan.Seabees cheered in local Mardi Gras paradeStory by Petty Officer 1st Class Jonathan Carmichaelhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/101315/seabees-cheered-local-mardi-gras-parade#ixzz2K2qeTtQ0OCEAN SPRINGS, Miss. – Sailors assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 11 tookpart in a Mardi Gras Parade in Ocean Springs, Miss., Jan. 26, 2013, in support of the parade’stheme, “Salute to the Military.”Navy Divers, Waipahu Students Walk Tall to Promote Drug PreventionBy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nardel Gervacio, Commander, Navy RegionHawaii Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71923WAIPAHU, Hawaii (NNS) -- Navy divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 1,accompanied by local firefighters and police officers, walked with teachers and students Feb. 6to raise awareness about drug prevention. Return to Top StoriesNMCB 74 Turns Over Camp Covington to Army’s 84th Engineer BattalionBy Shaina Marie Santos, Joint Region Marianas Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71602 2
    • SANTA RITA, Guam (NNS) -- Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 74 turned overcontrol of Camp Covington Jan. 17 to the Armys 84th Engineer Battalion (EN BN) during achange of charge ceremony at the camp on U.S. Naval Base Guam.In order for the Navy to meet operational missions around the world, the 84th EN BN, fromSchofield Barracks, Hawaii, relieved NMCB 74 as the forward-deployed presence in Guam forcontingency and humanitarian response, disaster assistance, theater security cooperation andconstruction readiness operations.Capt. Rodney Moore, commodore of the 30th Naval Construction Regiment, was the keynotespeaker for the event and addressed the increased need for joint military operations."We are making a bit of history today since this is the first time that Army engineers have takenover the Seabee mission here on Guam and throughout Oceania," he said. "In recent years, theU.S. military has faced some of its most challenging combat deployments and made it a commonpractice to operate jointly, and now we are putting that into practice here as we work together inunity to support the fleets maritime security and response objectives."NMCB 74 Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Brandon Casperson said regardless of the branch ofcommand, the mission will continue."The legacy of contingency and peacetime construction remains the same," he said. "As acombined effort for all those who build and fight in support of our nations military."During NMCB 74s tour on Guam, construction was completed on several projects including acommunication shelter, softball head and medical facility at Camp Covington, a steel range bermimprovement at NBG, and 40 percent of the Polaris Point pure water tanker facility. NMCB 74Sailors also volunteered for community service projects to include assisting at Special Olympicsof Guam events and community events on Naval Base Guam.Lt. Col. Aaron Reisinger, 84th EN BN commanding officer, thanked NMCB 74 for supportduring the battalions move and said he is proud to be on Guam to carry on the mission and honorthe Seabees contribution."To the Seabees of NMCB 74 who supported this transition, thank you," he said. "You are atremendous group of professionals who should be extremely proud of both youraccomplishments and reputation."The 84th EN BNs 250 Soldiers deployed to Guam will ensure a seamless transition ofconstruction projects during their nine-month tour, including a shelter for pure water storagetanker truck, Camp Covington Communication Shelter, several parking lots and various projectsat Andersen Air Force Base.Approximately 140 Sailors with NMCB 74 will return to their duty station in Gulfport, Miss.NMCB 5 Det. Guam, a 21-person support element will remain on the island to provide logistical 3
    • and financial oversight of various projects.Navy construction battalions have been on Guam since the islands liberation from Japaneseoccupation in 1944. Since then, Seabees completed the initial construction on the islands mainthoroughfare, Marine Corps Drive, and helped Guam recover from the devastation of severaltyphoons. Return to Top StoriesNAVFAC Far East commander visits NMCB 5 Det. Diego Garciahttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/101041/navfac-far-east-commander-visits-nmcb-5-det-diego-garcia#ixzz2K2m0dbeiby Construction Electrician 1st Class Jason Bridwell, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5Public AffairsDIEGO GARCIA, U.K. - The commander of Navy Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC)Far East, Capt. Don Chandler, visited Diego Garcia to tour sites with the new contractor G4SSan Juan during a major contract renewal the week of Jan. 15.During his visit, he held a luncheon lunch with all of the Seabees currently on the island. Theseincluded: Public Works, Self Help, and Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalions 5and 74.At the time of his arrival, the two battalions were conducting a turnover for two major quality oflife projects military, civilian and contract employees working and residing on the island.During the lunch Chandler requested to tour the contractor living unit currently underconstruction. Seabees from both battalions accompanied Chandler during the tour of the currentproject site and also showed him the future location for the next CLU which is set to beginconstruction soon.Seabee battalions perform these projects as part of construction readiness operations to learn newengineering skills and maintain core proficiencies while enhancing infrastructure on militarybases worldwide. Return to Top StoriesNMCB 15 Leaders Participate in Convoy Simulator TrainingBy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Garas, Naval Mobile ConstructionBattalion 15 Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71698GULFPORT, Miss (NNS) -- Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB)15,based in Belton, Mo., participated in convoy simulator training Jan. 24. 4
    • Over two days, officers and other key leaders trained to run a Combat Operation Center (COC)and experience the difficulties of communicating during vehicle mounted convoy operationsthrough the use of simulators run by the 20th Seabee Readiness Group (SRG)."I found the training beneficial because I had never done anything like it before," said EnsignMichael Cole, NMCB 15s embarkation commander. "Everything was new to me. It was an eye-opening experience to how fast everything happens."The simulator has three different bays, complete with replicate high-mobility multipurposewheeled vehicles that are surrounded by a 360-degree screen onto which a variety ofprogrammable scenarios can be projected. During the training the group ran through severaldifferent obstacles that included driving through urban environments, rough terrain, ambushesand running into an improvised explosive device (IED)."For the purpose of communication and quick decision making it great training," said Lt. jg.Jamil Ramos, of NMCB 15s Alpha company.Personnel controlling the simulator highlighted the challenges that they or their junior Sailorsmay encounter during convoys by adding challenges to the simulation or altering the terrain. Thestudents communicated with other vehicles in their convoy and worked to transmit situationalreports (SITREPs), while engaged in a variety of training scenarios."From an enlisted standpoint, you get visibility on what kind of things they may be exposed to,"Ramos said. "That tends to open up your eyes for your frame of mind to focus and make betterdecisions."According to Ron Williams, a civilian contractor working for the 20th SRG, the simulators savetime and money by eliminating the need to reset live-action scenarios and can be used to designspecific lessons. In addition, if a Sailors duty usually keeps them restricted to the COC, it allowsthem the unique opportunity to get an understanding of how mounted convoy operations work.During the simulation debrief, Williams stressed the need for commanders to understandpatience when seeking information. "If your back at the COC and asking for a SITREP, you haveto give your people time to send it up," said Williams. "As you just experienced, your peoplemay be dealing with several complex problems at once."At the conclusion of the training, Ramos commented on how simulators helped highlight theimportance of their communication."During convoy you have to be able to communicate, receive information and understand how toprocess it to make a command decision. It may be what keeps your people alive."NMCB 15 is currently mobilized to Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport, executingpre-deployment homeport training in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and is anexpeditionary element of U.S. Naval Forces that act as civil engineers and support various units 5
    • worldwide through national force readiness, humanitarian assistance, and building andmaintaining infrastructure. Return to Top StoriesNMCB 3 Targets Confidence During Weapons TrainingBy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Chris Fahey, Naval MobileConstruction Battalion 3 Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71853PASO ROBLES, Calif. (NNS) -- Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3completed a vital step in deployment preparation, Jan. 30, after qualifying on five differentcombat weapons systems.According to Chief Warrant Officer 2 Richard Anglin, the training events officer in charge,participants safely operated the M240B and Mk2 .50 cal. machine guns; the Mk19 and M203grenade launchers and the AT4 rocket launcher."When deployed, we are responsible to provide our own security - our Army and Marine Corpscounterparts rely on that ability and dont see us as an element needing their defense," saidAnglin. "These weapons are part of the defensive layers we use to protect ourselves. They are acritical skillset, and Im seeing a lot of great effort by our Seabees."The weapons allow Seabees to engage enemy combatants at greater distances and in largerquantities than the standard issue M4 or M16 semi-automatic weapons. Each of the M240B andMk2 .50 cal. machine guns has a maximum effective range of up to 1,800 meters.The Mk19 grenade launcher can engage pockets of enemies at 2,212 meters with a blast radius of15 meters.In contrast to Mk19, which is mounted on a tripod, the M203 is a personnel-carried grenadelauncher that fits underneath either the M4 or M16. It carries a maximum effective range of 350meters with the same blast radius as the Mk19.Unlike any of the machine guns or grenade launchers, the anti-tank AT4 is a hand-carried rocketlauncher with a maximum effective range equal to the M203 but can penetrate heavily armoredvehicles and boasts a 65 meter blast radius."It has a really big boom!" said Builder Seaman (SCW) Michael Dorsey, one of nearly 400Seabess who participated. "You can feel the force thump your chest and see a good sizedmushroom cloud upon contact ... Its nice!"The weapons familiarization and qualifications event is a critical step in preparing to deploy.Following completion, NMCB 3 will participate in a graded field training exercise (FTX) thatdetermines whether or not they are ready to put boots on ground. Ensuring the Seabees are 6
    • confident and ready before the exercise, places NMCB 3 in the best possible position to succeed."When Im gearing up to take charge of whichever weapon Im assigned to operate, I feel ready -more than ready," said Equipment Operator 3rd Class (SCW) Izzy Hidalgo. "I know I can helpmy fellow Seabee if we take fire, and I feel completely secure that the person next to me has thesame knowledge. Thanks to this training, I feel 100 percent confident that we are all capablewarfighters, and I know we will smoke FTX."NMCB 3 provides combatant commanders and Navy component commanders with combat-ready warfighters capable of general engineering, construction and limited combat engineeringacross the full range of military operations. Return to Top StoriesNMCB 11 Awarded Battle “E” for FY2012By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jonathan Carmichael, Naval Mobile ConstructionBattalion 11 Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71823GULFPORT, Miss. (NNS) -- Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 was the activecomponent awarded the Atlantic Fleet Naval Construction Force (NCF) Battle Efficiency (Battle"E") award for fiscal year 2012.The prestigious award follows a fiscal year in which NMCB-11 successfully completed anarduous training cycle and a highly productive eight-month United States Central Command(CENTCOM) deployment.Cmdr. Lore Aguayo, Commanding Officer of NMCB-11, congratulated and thanked the Seabeesof the battalion, and the unclassified message naming the selections was read aloud to thecommand on the morning of Jan. 14 following the holiday stand-down period.Rear Adm. Mark A. Handley, commander of 1st Naval Construction Division, directly addressedNMCB-11 in the message."You demonstrated exceptional performance in executing your mission, taking care of yourpersonnel and equipment, and fostering great pride during combat operations in support ofOperation enduring freedom. Your aggressive training program through a shortened homeportwith a focus on tactical and technical skills and small unit leadership forged a cohesive, capableand motivated unit ready to meet any challenge."Your outstanding preparation and leadership was apparent in the exemplary performancedisplayed during your eight-month CENTCOM deployment, providing superlative engineersupport to U.S. Forces-Afghanistan conducting general, mobility and survivability engineeringoperations for three supported commands operating at 77 dispersed locations throughout all sixNATO ISAF regional commands. 7
    • "With a focus on the highest levels of safety, quality and accountability, you successfullycompleted over 70 projects and over 46,000 mandays of construction tasking, counterinsurgencyoperations and training support to Afghan engineer forces. Your efforts improved forceprotection, enhanced freedom of movement, and improved quality of life for U.S. and coalitionforces, and set the stage for the surge draw down of U.S. and coalition forces and the eventualtransfer of the mission to Afghan forces."Despite arduous conditions and geographically dispersed operations, your management of (....)Civil Engineer Support Equipment (CESE) was remarkable. Your tremendous accomplishmentsclearly demonstrate you are most deserving of this honor. Bravo Zulu on your selection and on ajob well done!"All 2012 NCF Battle "E" award winners as named are: NMCB-11 (active) and NMCB-27(reserve) from the Atlantic Fleet; and NMCB-4 (active) and NMCB-25 (reserve) from the PacificFleet. Return to Top StoriesNMCB 5’s CCAD Philippines renovates Aplaya elementary school buildingby Construction Electrician Constructionman Quennie May Bumatay, Naval MobileConstruction Battalion 5 Public Affairshttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/101208/nmcb-5s-ccad-philippines-renovates-aplaya-elementary-school-building#ixzz2K2pxgRVYPUERTO PRINCESA, Philippines - Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 arerenovating a building for the Aplaya Elementary School as part of a Construction Civic ActivityDetail in Barangay Tagburos, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan.In its current state, the 24-feet-by-56-feet two-room masonry building has wood and plant-wovenwalls with a bare dirt floor. This project will greatly improve the building by installingprefabricated steel trusses, concrete columns, a corrugated metal roof, gutters, metal doors and ahardiflex drop ceiling. The detail will also stucco and paint the structure’s exterior to match theother existing buildings at the school.According to school Principal Macaria Peloto Camacho, the finished project will have asignificant impact to the neighborhood particularly to the 651 students and 20 teachers whoattend and work at the school."The construction of new classrooms will greatly benefit the students, teachers and the entireneighborhood,” said Principal Camacho. She said that the school currently does not have enoughclassrooms to accommodate all of the students. “We have to divide the classes into morning andafternoon session in order to have room for all the children in the neighborhood,” she said.“I am very grateful for all the work that the U.S. military has been doing for us. It is indeed ablessing for this community." said Jovelyn Mulato, one of the school’s third-grade teachers. 8
    • Seabees conduct CCAD operations like this one in order to demonstrate U.S. commitment,develop enduring relationships, improve public infrastructure for the delivery of essentialservices, and strengthen local institutions with host and partner nations around the world.Commanded by Cmdr. Peter Maculan, NMCB 5 is homeported in Port Hueneme, California andis currently deployed to multiple sites throughout the U.S. Pacific Command area ofresponsibility. Return to Top StoriesSeabees cheered in local Mardi Gras paradeStory by Petty Officer 1st Class Jonathan Carmichaelhttp://www.dvidshub.net/news/101315/seabees-cheered-local-mardi-gras-parade#ixzz2K2qeTtQ0OCEAN SPRINGS, Miss. – Sailors assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 11 tookpart in a Mardi Gras Parade in Ocean Springs, Miss., Jan. 26, 2013, in support of the parade’stheme, “Salute to the Military.”Forty-five volunteers from NMCB-11 marched three abreast in uniform the approximately two-and-a-half mile parade route to cheers and shouts of encouragement from the large crowd whogathered on both sides of the road for the sunny Saturday afternoon festivities.The parade-goers ranged from small children to senior citizens.The parade was the 38th annual Ocean Springs Mardi Gras parade sponsored by the OceanSprings Elks Lodge 2501.Other parade participants included Seabees assigned to the 20th Seabee Readiness Group inGulfport, Miss., as well as a number of vehicles and bead tossing floats representing variouslocal and regional entities.“We felt a real sense of pride,” said Construction Electrician 1st Class Dedrick L. Harris, whocoordinated and organized the march for NMCB-11.“I think it puts a face to the name for the community. It gives them a chance to show theirappreciation for the positive things the Seabees and NMCB-11 do all the time while reinforcingour sense of belonging to the community,” added Harris. “It was a great experience foreverybody involved.”NMCB-11 is a Seabee battalion specializing in contingency construction, disaster response andhumanitarian assistance. The battalion is home-ported in Gulfport, Miss. Return to Top Stories 9
    • Navy Divers, Waipahu Students Walk Tall to Promote Drug PreventionBy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nardel Gervacio, Commander, Navy RegionHawaii Public Affairshttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71923WAIPAHU, Hawaii (NNS) -- Navy divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 1,accompanied by local firefighters and police officers, walked with teachers and students Feb. 6to raise awareness about drug prevention.The Waipahu Elementary School Drug Free Walk is an annual event held within the Waipahuneighborhood to promote education, mentoring and healthy lifestyle choices with a focus on drugprevention awareness."MDSU-1 has sponsored the drug free walk for the past five years," said Cmdr. Thomas Murphy,MDSU-1 commanding officer. "We have also continued our relationship with the school inweekly health activities through the Waipahu Elementary School keiki fitness program."Before the start of the walk, Gary Chun, principal of Waipahu Elementary School, thankedsponsors as well as the Sailors assigned to MDSU-1."This walk sends a message that we care about their lives and to let them know that drugs is notthe answer to living," said Chun."Drugs destroy so many lives. It is important that we teach children the dangers of drugs andhelp them to grow in the right direction," said MDSU-1 Construction Mechanic 1st ClassChristopher Thorp."Thats why I am here every week leading the keiki fitness program, volunteering for the"Kindergartners Are Most Precious" program at the beginning of each school year and the "ReadAloud America" program every two years," Thorp said.The approximately one-mile walk started along Waikele Road, continuing through PupupuhiStreet and Pupukahi Street and Farrington Highway, as the students shouted "be drug free" alongthe route. Many drivers honked as they drove by to show their support."This event is great for the community. It brings the military and the locals closer together," saidYeoman 2nd Class (EXW/SW) Andrew Linga of Los Angeles, assigned to MDSU-1. "By gettingthe students early with these events and the message it brings, the kids become aware that drugsare not a way to be, and we all see that with the flyers theyre holding up this morning."Thorp said all children deserve a safe and nurturing environment and to have positive rolemodels in their community. "After all, they are our countrys future leaders," he said.Murphy explained the goals of the drug free walk for the neighborhood, led by Thorp and othermembers of the MDSU-1 team. 10
    • "When the community sees the Sailors involved, they know that were here and we care. Its a bigimpact to them," said Linga.At the conclusion of the walk, Sailors served healthy snacks to the students."We hope to have a positive impact on the community and the students at Waipahu ElementarySchool. It is also important that the community sees that our Sailors care about the localcommunity, the elementary school and, most importantly, its young students," Murphy said."Were proud of who we are and what we do, and were proud to be supporting the students andlocal community," he added."First off what were doing is planting seeds into the hearts and minds of the young," said ChiefNavy Diver (DSW/SS/SW) Donald R. Acker of Waianae, who welcomed every student withhigh-fives when they completed the walk."Drugs and alcohol all have bad effects on people when done improperly. For the neighborhood,I believe in a tipping point by us walking around like we did today. It gives them motivation andfor hope and for something positive, something bigger and better than what they are bythemselves," Acker said.Nelda Soosenuu, a parent whose son is in kindergarten, said, "The Sailors have been verysupportive, and I know that the kids look up to them. Its important to teach our kids whiletheyre still young to be drug free and as they get older, theyll understand. Im grateful thattheyre all here today."MDSU-1 provides combat ready, expeditionary, rapidly deployable mobile diving and salvagedetachments to conduct harbor clearance, salvage, underwater search and recovery, andunderwater emergency repairs in any environment. Return to Top Stories 11