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Auditing 101
 

Auditing 101

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From the 2010 Alliance to Save Energy Green Campus Energy Efficiency Summit – Greening the Campus, Building the Workforce

From the 2010 Alliance to Save Energy Green Campus Energy Efficiency Summit – Greening the Campus, Building the Workforce

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    Auditing 101 Auditing 101 Presentation Transcript

    • Auditing 101 Morgan King, Campus Lead Jackie Mercure, CSU Chico Team Manager
    • Why Do an Energy Audit? Knowing is half the battle Prioritization of savings measures WHY DO AN ENERGY AUDIT? Self Generation Broad vs. targeted audits
    • Energy Audit Procedure • EVALUATE EXISTING ENERGY CONSUMPTION • IDENTIFY SAVINGS MEASURES • REPORT RESULTS ENERGY AUDIT PROCEDURE • INSTALL, ENABLE, EDUCATE ON SAVINGS MEASURES • FOLLOW-UP
    • Basic Tools for the Energy Audit MARKETING MATERIALS WATT METERS BALLAST CHECKERS LIGHT METER SPREADSHEETS/ CALCULATORS REPORT TEMPLATE LIST OF RECOMMENDATIONS
    • Energy Vs. Power  Watts (W) and kilowatts (kW) measure power, or the rate at which electrical work is performed.  Watt-hours (Wh) and kilowatt-hours (kWh) measure energy, or the quantity of electricity used.  Demand is measured in watts, Consumption is measured in watt hours.  Estimate how many hours a day the device is used in a given period of time such as one month. Multiply this by kilowatts to determine kilowatt-hours (kWh).  W/1000 x hours of use = kWh
    • Power Vs. Energy Example: AC Power: 2.1 kW 2500 2000 1500 Watts Power Vs. Energy 1000 Example: AC500 0 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 Time Energy: 1.1 kWh 6
    • ENERGY COSTS USING kWh TO FIGURE COSTS AND GHG $0.11-$0.18 per kWh (CA) 1.3 lbs CO2 per kWh (US) 0.8 lbs CO2 per kWh (CA, CCAR)
    • Common Appliance Energy Use Average EnergyUs Average CO2 Emissions Watts Hours ed per Appliance Cost per per Month (W) Used Per Month Month ($)* (Lbs)** Month (kWh) Refrigerator/Freezer (Energy Star) 800 117 94 12 47 Refrigerator/Freezer (Pre 1992) 600 215 129 17 65 Flat Screen TV 120 120 14 2 7 DVD Player 22 45 1 0 0 Common Appliance Energy 15 Microwave 1,000 Use 15 2 8 Clothes Dryer - Electric 4,600 20 92 12 46 *$0.13 per kWh (online search) **0.5 lbs CO2 per kWh
    • Phantom Loads Phantom Load
    • Phantom Loads PHANTOM LOADS $3 BILLION A YEAR! DOE, 2007
    • Plug Load Recommendations • Behaviors • Controls and Operations • Upgrades and Retrofits • Eliminate Redundancies
    • Plug Load Audit Exercise PLUG LOAD AUDIT EXERCISE
    • Campus Overhead Lighting  Components of lighting systems: • Lamps (fluorescent, incandescent, halogen) • Ballasts (8 - 20% of the energy!) • Fixtures • Controls  Adjustments to any of these components can reduce energy consumption.  Daylighting also needs consideration.
    • How Fluorescent Lamps Work
    • T8 Vs. T12 Comparison of T8 and T1 2 Flu oresce nt Systems mp # Lamps/Watt/Le ngth Ballast Type Watts/Ft 2 CRI† Annual e Operatin g Cost ² 2 3/4 0 W/ 4 8 ” T1 2 Magnetic 1.5 62 $4, 5 00 3/3 2 W/ 4 8 ” T8 Electr onic 0.8 86 $2, 4 00 T8 VS. T12 †CRI = Color Rendering Index. The higher the CRI, the more natural objects will appear under a light source ∆Based on $0.12/kWh at 3,000 hrs/year operation
    • De-lamping and Design By Task • Illuminance measures amount of light falling on a surface • 1 footcandle = 1 lumen/square foot • IES recommendations Conference Areas = 30 Footcandles DE-LAMPING AND Classrooms = 30 – 50 Footcandles DESIGN and Waiting Areas = 10 Footcandles Lounge BY TASK • Light Meters
    • Lighting Recommendations LIGHTING RECOMMENDATIONS  Replace older fluorescent systems (T12 Magnetic) with more efficient (T8 Electronic) lamps & ballasts  Convert incandescent fixtures and lamps to fluorescent fixtures and lamps  Use task lighting to minimize overhead lighting  Maximize day-lighting  Regular cleaning, replace diffusers  Turn off lights when not needed, and/or use automatic controls
    • Audit Program Case Study: SCOOP
    • SCOOP Paper Waste/ Recycling Purchasing Elements of a SCOOP Audit Health Energy Phantom loads Lighting
    • SCOOP Recommendations Top Three Recommended Changes Turn off your power strips at night. Install Power Management Software on existing computer labs. Install Paper Reuse trays next to paper stations such as printer and on personal desks. More detailed recommendations follow later in this report. Positive Existing Behaviors and Practices Employees utilize a central office printer with paper recycling bins present. Paperless application process established for announcements and other documents. Organized power strips are utilized at every workstation; most were observed to be easily accessible. Recommendations Computers (Also see Energy section for more information regarding computers) Power strips should be turned off in the evening. Set power settings (See attachment “How to Make Your Computer Save Energy”) Disable screen savers! Turn off unattended computer monitors.
    • SCOOP Reporting Sustainable Consultation Of Office Practices (SCOOP) Recommendations Report Date of Consultation: April, 2008 SCOOP would like to thank you for allowing us to assess your current and potential sustainable office practices. We believe that sustainability is about a healthy environment, smart economics, and cooperative communities. Your willingness to accept feedback from our team shows that you are committed to making a positive impact within the CSU, Chico community, which is an important aspect of sustainability on this campus. We hope that this recommendation report will encourage office practices that will support the health of the environment. Score Overall Score: VERY GOOD Award: Certificate of Participation
    • SCOOP
    • Thank You! More Energy Audit Resources Available on Project Spaces Morgan King, Campus Lead Morgan@seiinc.org Jackie Mercure, CSU Chico Team Manager SCOOP Contact Info: E-mail: scoop@csuchico.edu www.csuchico.edu/sustainablefuture/scoop