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Fall/Winter 2015 VOL. 25	 a publication for donors, volunteers, and friends of Luther Manor	Fall/Winter 2015 VOL. 25	 a publication for donors, volunteers, and friends of Luther Manor
You are an important
PIECE of Luther Manor
Your gifts and talents make
Luther Manor whole
Volunteer hits
impressive
milestones
At 100, Alva Heup shows
no signs of slowing down
A place for families
Donors fund Sacred Space
Greetings donors, volunteers and partners,
This fall, we are excited to celebrate a special milestone in Luther Manor’s history, the 30th
anniversary of the Luther Manor Foundation.
The Luther Manor Foundation was established to ensure long-term financial support for Luther
Manor’s most vulnerable residents through the Resident Support Fund. Thanks to the foresight of Luther Manor’s
Board of Directors and donors like you, no resident has ever been asked to leave due to his or her inability to fully
fund care and services.
Your continued support is critical to the fulfillment of our mission. Donations to the Luther Manor Foundation are
one of many ways you are making a difference in the Luther Manor community, and helping to enrich the lives of
older adults through excellent housing, care and services.
In this issue of The Messenger, we draw the comparison of Luther Manor to a puzzle. Many pieces need to fit
together in order for Luther Manor’s mission to be realized and to complete the puzzle. These pieces include:
project donations, seasonal appeals, in-kind donations, tribute/memorial gifts, gifts of service, and fundraising.
We continue to look to you —our donors, volunteers, and partners —to be a piece of the puzzle; to work with our
professionals in Resource Development and Volunteer Services to find the giving and service opportunities that fit
your personal preferences and values.
As anyone who has ever assembled a jigsaw puzzle knows, every piece is vitally important. While we may have
different strategies for completing a puzzle, it’s incomplete if even one piece is missing. We depend on your
generosity and your talents to complete our Luther Manor puzzle.
We are thankful for our many donors and volunteers who have contributed to the realization of Luther Manor’s
mission over the past three decades, from the board members who established the Foundation to the youth
volunteers who pitch in over the summer. Everyone has a role to play; everyone is a piece of our puzzle.
Thank you for your continued support of Luther Manor.
Sincerely,
Stephanie Chedid, President and CEO
On the cover
Volunteer and donor
Larry Nines provides
Luther Manor with
many gifts. Read about
how he and others
make a difference on
page 4.
You
you.
puzzle
others
life.
are a piece
of the
of someone elses
You may never know where you fit,
but
will fill the holes in their lives
with pieces of
- Bonnie Arbon
- 3 -- 3 -
supporters
Luther Manor
th
Anniversary
H
appy
Luther Manor is
incredibly fortunate
to have a foundation
that supports our
mission.
”“
Luther Manor is celebrating a special milestone this fall:
the 30th
anniversary of the Luther Manor Foundation.
The Luther Manor Foundation was formed in 1985
with the mission of ensuring long-term financial
support for Luther Manor’s
ministry to share God’s love
with older adults, specifically by
providing financial assistance to the
most vulnerable residents – those
who have outlived their assets and
can no longer afford their care.
Over the past three decades, the
Luther Manor Foundation has
given more than $6.6 million in
resident support and an additional $3.8 million in other
grants to the United Lutheran Program for the Aging,
according to Luther Manor Chief Financial Officer
Elizabeth Diehl. Meanwhile, the corpus of $15.9 million
remains preserved.
“Luther Manor is incredibly fortunate to have a
Foundation that supports our mission,” said Luther
Manor President and CEO Stephanie Chedid. “It truly
reflects the compassion and generosity of those donors
who have firsthand knowledge of our good work and
those who give in support of our overall mission.”
Only the income earned on the principal, or corpus,
of the Luther Manor Foundation is used to provide
resident support.
“That the Luther Manor Foundation
has been able to meet the
ULPA requests every year
and that the principal is
still intact is quite an
accomplishment,”
said Foundation
Board member Fred
Anderson.
Anderson has served
on the Luther Manor
Foundation Board for
more than 10 years.
While it’s hard to know
how many residents have
been helped by the Foundation over the past 30 years,
Diehl said each year in recent years, about 40 residents
in the Courtyards have benefited from the generosity of
the Foundation.
“We have seen health care costs rise at a
rate much higher than the economy and
definitely higher than the reimbursement
rates we receive from government payer
sources like Medicare and Medicaid,”
Chedid said. “The Foundation helps
close the gap between the cost of our
services and what we are paid for the
services.”
Chedid said she expects the Foundation
will continue to play an important role in Luther
Manor’s ability to fulfill its mission, and, in fact, will
take on a bigger role.
“We are in the midst of a search for a new Foundation
Director to guide us and help us grow and in turn help
Luther Manor deliver more mission,” Chedid said.
“Under the leadership of the Foundation Board’s
Chair, Tom Buck, we are also restructuring to help fuel
and ignite the passion in our current and future donors.
Luther Manor is a special community and through the
Foundation’s support we will continue to be so well
into the future.”
To make a donation to the Luther Manor Foundation,
contact Resource Development at (414) 464-3880. g
Providing resident support for 30 years
Luther Manor celebrates Foundation milestone
- 4 -
supporters
Luther Manor
On a pleasant summer day, a group
of men from the Luther Manor
Courtyards and the Men’s Club
of St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in
Waukesha discuss beanbag toss
strategy and joke as they enjoy
an afternoon of yard games and
fellowship at Retzer Nature Center.
For the past three years, the two
men’s clubs have been meeting
several times a year for a joint
activity.
and CEO David Keller invited him
to serve on the United Lutheran
Program for the Aging Board of
Directors.
Over the years, Nines has expanded
his volunteerism at Luther Manor to
include the Men’s Club partnership,
the Employee Family event and the
the Resource Development Thank
A Thon; eventually he became a
donor, as well.
“If you invest your time and your
talent in an organization, the
third logical piece is treasure,”
Nines said. “By not involving all
three components it would be
like not giving my best. I think it
can happen in any order. You get
involved in one way or another and
then expand that connection, where
possible, to other areas.”
Nines participates in the annual
giving campaigns, and is a member
of the Heritage Partner Society,
a planned giving group whose
members have included Luther
Manor in their estate planning.
“Beyond the staff members who
keep Luther Manor running
by providing the basic services
and programs to residents and
participants, we rely tremendously
on donors and volunteers,”
said Luther Manor Resource
Development Officer Mary
Kanavas. “Luther Manor, in many
ways, is like a puzzle in that we
depend on many individual pieces
to fit together to help us fulfill our
mission or complete the puzzle.”
Donors and volunteers like Nines
provide important pieces of the
puzzle by supporting specific
projects beyond the
operating budget,
Are you
the missing
piece?
Find the right fit for
your gifts and talents
at Luther Manor
“It’s great for my male
residents, because men
are outnumbered in
the Courtyards 4 to 1,”
said Courtyards Life
Enrichment Specialist
Mark Mrozek. “It’s
a refreshing change
for them to be able
to spend time with other
men and get in touch with that
aspect of their humanity.”
Larry Nines, a Luther Manor
volunteer and member of the Men’s
Ministry at St. Mark’s Lutheran
Church, spearheaded the effort to
bring the two groups together.
“All too often, a church men’s group
is just a Saturday morning breakfast
or a Sunday morning Bible Study –
it’s not about spreading goodwill or
the message of the church,” Nines
said. “Giving men an opportunity
to share their time and their
interests with others is really a key
component to what men’s ministry
should be.”
Nines has had a long relationship
with Luther Manor that started
during his professional life
when he worked for the State of
Wisconsin. He helped nonprofit
health and educational providers,
including Luther Manor,
take advantage of tax-
exempt financial
borrowing
opportunities.
When he retired,
then-Luther
Manor President
Larry Nines
and wife, Vicki
- 5 -- 5 -
supporters
Luther Manor
I believe
in Luther Manor.
”“
making tribute and memorial gifts,
responding to seasonal appeals,
offering in-kind donations, and
providing gifts of time and talent.
“Larry Nines is a great supporter
of the Luther Manor community
through his many and varied
roles,” said Cheryl Schmitz,
Director of Volunteer Services.
“Larry came on board as a Luther
Manor volunteer in October 2012,
providing communion distribution
in the Adult Day Services and
Health Care Center. Larry and his
wife, Vicki, also serve as Friends
of Luther Manor keypersons
representing St. Mark’s Lutheran
Church in Waukesha.”
Others who have added multiple
pieces to the puzzle are Inga Harwick
and her daughter Viki Olsen.
Inga and her husband, Warren,
became familiar with Luther Manor
when they were members of Fox
Point Lutheran Church, the ULPA’s
founding congregation. Inga did
craft volunteering in the early years
and her mother, Emma Marlin, came
to live in the Courtyards in 1984.
The Harwicks moved from
Milwaukee for a few years, and on
their return joined Lake Park Lutheran
Church. To show their support of
Luther Manor, the Harwicks included
Luther Manor in their charitable
giving and are members of the
Heritage Partner Society.
To show their support of Luther
Manor, the Harwicks took out two
charitable gift annuities and in doing
so became members of the Heritage
Partner Society.
The Harwicks became Luther
Manor residents themselves in
2008, with Inga moving into the
Terrace and Warren into the Special
Care Center. At that point, Inga
discovered other pieces of the
puzzle that she could provide.
“She began her
volunteer service
in May 2009 and
has generously
gifted the Luther
Manor community
with over 1,182
hours of volunteer service using
her creative talents with the Terrace
Bazaar crafters,” said Schmitz.
The annual Holiday Bazaar is a
tradition at Luther Manor during
which residents and Adult Day
Services participants sell handmade
crafts as a fundraiser for various
projects to enhance the community.
“In addition, Inga has been a
faithful participant in the Resource
Development Thank A Thon annual
event calling donors to thank them
for their personal financial gifts,”
Schmitz said. “Most of all, Inga
was an exemplary role model and
supportive partner with Luther
Manor staff as a devoted caregiver
for her husband Warren. That is a
priceless gift.”
In Warren’s memory, Inga has
donated two outdoor benches for
the garden. His memorial service
was held in the Lippold Faith and
Education
Center
and all of
the memorial
gifts were
earmarked for the
Luther Manor Foundation.
The commitment to family is what
inspired Harwick’s daughter, Viki
Olsen, to become a keyperson at her
church, Kingo Lutheran, where she
coordinates the Friends of Luther
Manor membership
drive and cookie
collection.
“I believe in Luther
Manor,” Viki said.
“I am just really
impressed with the genuine caring
that the staff has, the different levels
of care, and it really impresses me
the respect and dignity that the staff
has for all of the residents – the way
they celebrate being a senior citizen
and your accomplishments.”
The Harwick family has a special
connection to Luther Manor; Inga’s
three great-grandchildren were
baptized by Director of Pastoral
Care Dave Patterson during the
Sunday morning church service.
This sort of connection is what
makes the community so special,
according to Kanavas.
“These are stories we love to hear
because it is our mission in action,”
she said. “Luther Manor is more
than a place – it is a community. We
all have a role to play; we all have
something we can contribute – some
piece in the Luther Manor puzzle.” g
Inga Harwick and
daughter, Viki Olsen
What piece are you? Call Luther Manor at (414) 464-3880
and ask for Resource Development or Volunteer Services to
learn about ways you can help Luther Manor complete the
puzzle and fulfill its mission.
”””
””
”
““““
“
“- 6 -
supporters
Luther Manor
Heritage Partners honored
Planned giving makes a lasting impact
June is recognized as “Planned Giving Month” at Luther Manor. A
luncheon was held on Wednesday, June 24 to thank the members of the
Heritage Partner Society—those who have included Luther Manor in their
estate planning.
Heritage Partner Society members are a group of special individuals
who envision a secure future for the older adults in the Luther Manor
community. With planned giving, donors are able to create a lasting legacy
to Luther Manor that will continue to serve well beyond their lifetimes.
“Heritage Partner Society members are an integral part of the support and
growth of the Luther Manor Foundation. We are very blessed by these
individuals,” said Mary Kanavas, Resource Development Officer.
About 30 Heritage Partner members attended the lunch. Honored guests
included President and CEO Stephanie Chedid and Foundation Board
Chair Tom Buck.
Buck and Chedid thanked the attendees and reiterated how very important
their gift and commitment to Luther Manor is. Chedid went on to discuss
all the different ways individuals can support Luther Manor through their
time, financial donations and the very important planned gift.
Attendees provided valuable feedback as to how Luther Manor can better
reach out to people and make them aware of the incredible value of planned
giving and how crucial it is for Luther Manor to receive this support.
“With all the ways to give to Luther Manor — volunteering, participating
in fundraisers, memorial gifts and appeal gifts — including Luther Manor
in our estate plan was an easy decision,” said Nancy Becher, Heritage
Partner member and volunteer. “Luther Manor is so important in our lives
and we like to participate in all aspects of giving back to this
wonderful organization.”
If you are interested in joining the Heritage Partner
Society, please contact Mary Kanavas, Resource
Development Officer at (414) 464-3880, ext. 462 or
mkanavas@luthermanor.org. g
Thank You for
Giving to the Lord
Notes from Pastor
Dave Patterson
Luther Manor has been, and
continues to be, blessed with
faithful stewards who unselfishly
give their time, talents and
treasures to support our mission
of “Sharing God’s love through
excellent housing, care and
services.” Throughout this
publication you will find biblical
principles that offer guidance as
to how we should give unto the
Lord. Here are a few to start.
Give Obediently
Honor the Lord with
your substance.
- Proverbs 3:9
Give Gratefully
What can I offer the LORD for
all he has done for me?
- Psalms 116:12
Give Cheerfully
God loves a cheerful giver.
- II Corinthians 9:7
Give Proportionately
Each of you must bring a gift
in proportion to the way the
LORD has blessed you.
- Deuteronomy 16:17
Give Sacrificially
The righteous gives
and spares not.
- Proverbs 21:26
Give Wisely
One gives freely, yet grows all
the richer; another withholds,
and only suffers want.
- Proverbs 11:24
Savethedate:
Sixth
Annual
Love Lights
Thursday,Dec.10,2015
- 7 -- 7 -
supporters
Luther Manor
Dear Friends of Luther Manor members,
Our 2015 funding projects have been a great success. They include six
benches located around the campus, continued maintenance of the
Terrace aquarium, two Hoyer lifts in the Courtyards to aid in resident
transfers, and the beautiful Love Lights tree that we can’t wait to see
this coming Advent Season. We are also in the process of purchasing new
campus signage to help visitors find their way.
I am excited to welcome three new keypersons: Bob and Joan Coffey at Gloria Dei, and Viki Olsen at Kingo. A
little trivia for you: Joan was a Friends of Luther Manor past President from 1978-1980 and it’s great to have her
back. Keypeople are an important link between the Friends of Luther Manor and our partner congregations.
Contact me if you are interested in taking on this critical role.
The Friends of Luther Manor 2015 annual meeting will be held on Sept. 24 in the Lippold Faith and Education
Center, hosted by St. John’s Church of Brookfield. LoAnn Peterman and Kathy Campbell will be our hostesses.
The third annual Jingle Mingle will take place Tuesday, Dec. 1 in the Terrace aquarium lobby. This is a
wonderful, fun, event for Terrace residents to come and learn about the Friends of Luther Manor and how we
support the entire Luther Manor campus. Last year’s event was a great success.
We are always searching for a few good volunteers to serve as officers on the board. We are currently looking for
a secretary and are excited to build up our fundraising committee. We have lots of fun as we work to support the
needs of Luther Manor residents. Please contact Sandy Wals or Mary Kanavas if you would like more information.
We are looking forward to 2016 and are excited to decide which campus projects we will support next year. We
are very pleased that the Friends of Luther Manor has a positive impact and directly touches all areas of the
community—this is so important to support the mission of Luther Manor.
Love and Hugs,
Sandy Wals, President of the Friends of Luther Manor and Luther Manor HCC Life Enrichment Specialist
The Friends of Luther Manor is excited to host the sixth annual Love Lights Tree Lighting ceremony on Thursday,
Dec. 10 at 4:30 p.m. in the Welcome Center.
Love Lights is the major fundraiser for the Friends of Luther Manor. The sale of lights that decorate the Luther
Manor Christmas tree support programs and services that benefit residents and participants throughout the
Luther Manor community. Last year, the Friends of Luther Manor raised more than $10,000 from this event.
Be a part of this special holiday tradition by purchasing an individual
light or a strand of lights to honor or memorialize someone special.
Individual lights are $5 and a strand of lights is $100.
The twinkling lights are turned on during the special tree lighting
ceremony. Kick off the Advent season with an evening filled with
music, prayer, refreshments and celebration.
For information about Love Lights, contact Resource
Development Officer Mary Kanavas at (414) 464-3880, ext. 462. g
Let our Love Lights shine bright
Honor those who are dear to you with Love Lights
- 8 -
supporters
Luther Manor
30
30%
Celebrate
give
!years
On Monday mornings, the basement of St. Mark’s
Lutheran Church is humming with the sound of
sewing machines as rainbow-hued squares of fabric
are assembled into blankets.
“It’s the Ford Assembly line of quilting,” said Pastor
Andy Fetters.
About a dozen dedicated quilters gather regularly to
make blankets that the church distributes to a number
of partner organizations in the community, and
beyond. Last year, the church donated a staggering
400 quilts.
“Some go out to the homeless in the community,
others go halfway around the world for the Lutheran
World Relief Quilt Mission and provide comfort to
those who have lost everything in a natural disaster,”
Fetters said.
The mission of St. Mark’s is “Gathered together by
God, to grow and go out” – and that is exactly what
the members of this close-knit congregation do.
“My goal is that we not have ‘consumer Christians’
– people who show up on Sunday, sit in church and
go home unchanged,” said Fetters, who has served
as pastor for three years. “When we gather, I want
people to be changed, and motivated to share the
good news in a variety of ways.”
Located just on the outskirts of downtown Waukesha
at 424 Hyde Park Ave., St. Mark’s Lutheran Church
was established in 1948 by Pastor George Dressler.
Before the church was built, worship services took
place at the neighboring Blair Elementary School.
Today the church is 900 strong – and growing.
One of the church’s biggest success stories is its effort
to fulfill its mission is its participation in Operation
Inasmuch, the national nonprofit that equips churches
Join in the celebration!
Year-end appeal supports Foundation
It has been 30 years since the creation of the Luther
Manor Foundation back in 1985. Over the last three
decades, the Foundation has enabled Luther Manor
to fulfill Luther Manor’s mission of sharing God’s
love by enriching the lives of older adults through
excellent housing, care and services.
Each donation made to the Luther Manor Foundation
ensures that Luther Manor is able to care for the most
vulnerable residents when they become financially
unable to take care of themselves. It was the dream of
the Foundation Board that Luther Manor not ever ask
any resident to leave because of their inability to pay
and 30 years later this time-honored tradition is still
going strong.
This fall, the year-end appeal will be a celebration
of this wonderful tradition. We are asking you, our
treasured donors, to increase your year-end gift by 30
percent in honor of this very special milestone.
Now, more than ever, we need to continue to support
the important work of the Luther Manor Foundation.
As we face increasing health care costs and decreased
government funding, many of our residents, through
no fault of their own, need support and assistance.
Please consider increasing your gift by 30 percent
or making a special one-time gift in honor of the
Foundation’s 30th
anniversary. By celebrating and
financially supporting the Luther Manor Foundation
in its 30th
year, we can lay the groundwork for a bright
and secure future for our residents.
Please continue to be a part of this wonderful mission
and support the Luther Manor
Foundation with an
extra special
gift this
year. g
Leaving a mark on
the community
God gathers St. Mark’s
members to ‘grow and go out’
- 9 -- 9 -
supporters
Luther Manor
to move more congregants out of the sanctuary seats and
into the streets to serve the neediest in their communities.
“The first time we did it was last fall, and 150 people
participated,” Fetters said. On Inasmuch Day, members
could choose to participate in one of 25 different service
opportunities in the community. “It really helps with
the ‘go out’ part of the mission.”
While St. Mark’s has many of the fellowship groups
one might expect to find in a Lutheran church – Fetters
prefers a unique approach to traditional topics. Two
formation groups that Fetters is particularly proud
of incorporate his own hobbies: brewing beer and
motorcycle riding.
“Roaring Lions is the motorcycle fellowship group. We
chose the Lion because St. Mark has been attributed the
character of the lion,” Fetters said.
The second group is called “Faith Fermentation,” which
marries the hobby of brewing beer and Bible study.
“There is a lot of time in between fermentation,” Fetters
said. “While we brew beer we dig into scripture.”
St. Mark’s is also actively involved in the elder ministry,
with members supporting Luther Manor as Friends
of Luther Manor and volunteers. An important link
between Luther Manor and St. Mark’s is the family of
John and Betty Thompson, who served for 10 years as
keypersons – taking over when John’s mother, Frances
Thompson, stepped down.
As keypersons, the Thompsons were responsible for
organizing the Friends of Luther Manor membership
drives and cookie cart collections at St. Mark’s.
“May would be Luther Manor month,” Thompson said.
St. Mark’s
“We would collect cookies and recruit people to join the
auxiliary (now known as the Friends of Luther Manor).”
Now Larry and Vicki Nines undertake this responsibility.
The church’s initial connection to Luther Manor was
Pastor James Wilch, who led the congregation for 52
years. Pastor Wilch’s mother was a Luther Manor
resident. But even after Wilch’s mother passed away
and he retired, the church remained committed to its
Luther Manor connection.
“I really feel that one of the missions of the church is
to support people as they age and to make sure older
members are remembered and cared for,” Thompson said.
To that end, Thompson and his wife visit members of
St. Mark’s who are homebound. The Thompsons have
been members of St. Mark’s since 1962.
“As with any church, there is always more we could
be doing,” Thompson said. “But we are proud of what
the church does and Luther Manor is one of those good
things.”
Fetters, who served out east before moving to
Wisconsin, had high praise for the members of his flock.
“This is one of the most generous congregations I have
ever been a part of. It shows in the use of their time, the
gifts God has blessed them with, the resources that they
share, and the heart that goes into it all,” Fetters said.
“Their deep love of God is contagious and they don’t
want to keep it to themselves. We are a very diverse
congregation – politically and economically – we are
really united in our baptism and that is exciting.” g
- 10 -
supporters
Luther Manor
On the second floor of the Luther
Manor Health Care Center, just
before the Truby Pavilion begins,
there is a very special place. It is
warm and welcoming to all who
pass through its threshold. It is a
place where families visiting loved
ones on the final phase of life’s
journey can gather to pray, recharge,
or just be with one another. This
special place is known as Luther
Manor’s Sacred Space.
The Sacred Space was created to
support Luther Manor residents
and their families during this
difficult time with not only a
physical location to gather, but
also access to the information and
expertise of the Luther Manor
Hospice staff and volunteers.
“Families who have had loved
ones in our Hospice program have
been so grateful to be able to use
the Sacred Space, which was made
possible through charitable gifts,”
said Mary Kanavas, Resource
Development Officer. “Charitable
giving is such a critical part of
Luther Manor’s ability to achieve
its mission. Without it, taking on
special projects that fall outside
of the operating budget—like the
Sacred Space—would be much
more difficult.”
Funding for the hospice-specific
space came from two sources: a
$40,000 grant from the Lutheran
Service for the Elderly Endowment
at the ELCA Foundation, awarded
to Luther Manor in the fall of 2013;
and a generous donation from
Terrace resident Joyce Stibbe.
So what drives a person to give?
A Harvard Business School study
showed that happier people give
more and giving makes people
Spring fund drive
supports residents
With May marking the 50th
anniversary of the Older Americans
Act of 1965, many of you
responded to our “Get into the Act”
appeal. Thanks to your generosity,
the Luther Manor Foundation was
able to raise $17,640.
Our annual appeals are an
important part of growing and
sustaining the Luther Manor
Foundation. It is through the
strength of the Foundation that we
are able to carry out our mission
every day at Luther Manor.
Thank you to all who responded
with a generous gift. Now, more
than ever, we need your continued
support. We appreciate your
generosity and commitment to
Luther Manor. g
Joyce Stibbe
A place for families
Donors fund hospice space
Celebrating Older
Americans
Act!
Get into the
- 11 -- 11 -
supporters
Luther Manor ”“
The Sacred Space is
flexible, functional,
peaceful and lovely.
”“ Give to support the ministry
Do not look out for your own
personal interests, but also for the
interests of others.
- Philippians 2:4
happier, such that happiness and
giving may operate in a positive
feedback loop.
Stibbe’s desire to improve the
world around her and make it more
beautiful is what led her to the
Sacred Space giving opportunity.
Stibbe, who made Luther Manor
her home 13 years ago, is no
stranger to charitable giving.
Several years ago, she contacted
Resource Development to
discuss possible opportunities to
memorialize her husband, Otto.
“They came up with the idea of
planting a tree,” Stibbe said. “I
liked that very well.”
Now, on the hillside, among the N,
U, and T, buildings a 2-year-
old Maple tree is growing in
Otto’s honor.
“We try to work with donors
to find a way for them to give
that is meaningful to them,”
Kanavas said. “Giving to the
Sacred Space was a way that felt
meaningful to Joyce.”
Originally from North Dakota,
Stibbe’s father died when she
was in high school. Her family
consisted of her mother, a sister
and a brother. Both of her siblings
have now passed, and her nieces
and nephews live out of state,
so Stibbe is all that is left of her
family in Wisconsin.
Stibbe thought it would be nice
for families to have a special
place - like the Sacred Space -
to go.
Hospice Spiritual Care
Coordinator Minister Marian
Wasierski shared how families
are utilizing
the space.
“Families
have managed
comfort foods
with the
refrigerator and
microwave.
Families have gathered around
the large round table with their
resident, each other, and staff
for serious and fun times,”
Wasierski said.
“Families and residents have sat
quietly in front of the fireplace,
visiting, regrouping and relaxing.
Staff has sat with residents,
providing private social and
spiritual care visits, with television
on or off. The Sacred Space is
flexible, functional, peaceful and
lovely.”
Luther Manor’s Medicare-certified
Hospice Program has been
operating for six years, giving
patients and their loved ones the
opportunity to make decisions
about end of life care while
being supported by a dedicated,
compassionate staff.
Stibbe could not be happier with how
the Sacred Space has turned out.
“I thought it looked beautiful,”
she said. “I love the fireplace, the
draperies —everything that is there.
I love the whole thing.”
Stibbe also offered her personal
touch, donating a porcelain angel
that sits inside the curio cabinet.
“I like to beautify things,” she said.
“Make things better for everybody.”
What inspires
you to give?
Luther Manor
Resource
Development
can help
you find the
charitable
giving opportunity that best fits
your unique personality.
Call Mary Kanavas, Resource
Development Officer at (414) 464-
3880 ext. 462. g
Blessed with great gifts
Hospice volunteer offers her presence
- 12 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
Thank you for
lending a hand
Volunteer I am
by Eileen Thompson
Twenty-four hours in every day.
Where can I go to give some away?
For my time is a gift.
My experience gold,
All I desire...
Is a small hand to hold.
A tear to wipe, a child to soothe
A lonely patient to comfort when blue
A harried worker to lend a hand to
There's no need for you to strike up the band
For I rarely seek out the fanfare of man.
I simply have time to give quite away
To help those in need and brighten their day
For my time is my own.
I give it for free.
A volunteer I am.
A volunteer I'll be.
• • •
To all of those Luther Manor volunteers who
make it their business to lend a hand, thank you.
To all of those looking to extend a hand to serve
older adults at Luther Manor, please consider
volunteering. We are currently seeking therapy
escorts, coffee cart host/hostess, resale shop
volunteers and ice cream parlor servers.
Contact Volunteer Services to discuss the
opportunity that might be right for you (414)
464-3880 ext. 600/577. g
Cheryl Schmitz,
Director of Volunteer Services
Lori Schultz,
Youth and Family Volunteer Specialist
A loving touch, a listening ear, a patient and
compassionate presence; these are some of the many gifts
a hospice companion volunteer provides to those Luther
Manor residents on their end of life journey.
Mary Houseman of Milwaukee is one of these volunteers.
Houseman, who retired as a school psychologist for the
Waukesha and Milwaukee Public Schools but currently
works part-time at the Highland Community School in
Milwaukee, began her volunteer service at Luther Manor
in August of 2014. She typically volunteers twice a week,
for three to four hours each day.
“I’ve always wanted to work with the elderly and in
hospice,” she said. “Luther Manor was a good fit for me
because I wished to be in a community where people really
cared about each other; a place that had a sense of mission,
purpose and commitment behind it.”
The Luther Manor Hospice Program currently has about
nine volunteers who provide companionship and support.
“Hospice volunteers are invaluable,” said Rachel Coleman,
Hospice Social Worker. “They play a vital role in our
hospice system, providing socialization, stimulation,
spiritual presence, comfort and peace.”
Houseman often focuses her attention on the hospice
patients who don’t have a lot of guests, but she visits with
anyone who would appreciate her presence.
“Every resident I have met is so different – unique and
special,” Houseman said. “The vast majority of people I
companion have been very appreciative, very gracious,
very kind, very caring; just a real pleasure to be with. Even
if they can’t verbally express themselves, its how they look
at you or touch you.”
Houseman, who practices mindfulness meditation, notes
that hospice patients are living in the moment.
“I am always working on my spirituality,” she said.
“I consider what I do a ministry, but also a way of
deepening my spirituality and my sense of the meaning
and purpose of life. The people I see here – it is real.
There is no pretense.”
- 13 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
Over the past year, Houseman has blessed Luther
Manor with more than 220 hours of dedicated service.
“One of Mary’s greatest gifts are her listening skills,
whether it is listening to an individual’s life history,
personal stories, memories or their concerns,” said
Cheryl Schmitz, Director of Volunteer Services.
“Luther Manor feels privileged to be able to match
her experiences and skills to enhance the services we
can offer in affirming the lives of residents who are
entrusted to our care.”
According to Coleman, Houseman meets the hospice
patients where they are on their journey.
“Mary understands that each visit may be different
than the last, but is always willing to spend time and
talk to people even if they aren’t able to reciprocate,”
Coleman said. “Not only is she dependable, but she is
open, honest, loving, and caring. She takes time with
the patients and families. I’m lucky to have a volunteer
like Mary.”
When Mary is not volunteering at Luther Manor, she
serves as a driver for Interfaith, taking older adults
Mary Houseman
who wouldn’t
otherwise
have access to
transportation
to doctor’s
appointments,
stores, food pantries
and clinics. She also
attends classes at the Osher
Life Long Learning Institute and
enjoys traveling. She most recently went
on an Alaskan Cruise. She also has two English Springer
Spaniels, Hattie, 13 and Francis, 9.
“I love volunteering in hospice because of the contact with
the residents,” Houseman said. “I serve them and they
serve me. They are giving as much or more back to me as
I give to them. I feel it is my privilege to bear witness to
their journey and be with them on this journey.”
For information about volunteer opportunities,
contact Luther Manor Volunteer Services at (414) 464-
3880 ext. 600/577. g
Resident Arlayne Grottveit and volunteer Mary Houseman.
- 14 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
We are the work of Your handsWe are the work of Your hands
Shaped to VolunteerShaped to Volunteer
A group of people made up of Terrace residents and
community members received special recognition in
April during the annual Volunteer Banquet.
The theme of this year’s event was “Shaped to
Volunteer, We are the Work of Your Hands.”
“Volunteers are uniquely crafted, molded and shaped
for a greater purpose,” said Director of Volunteer
Services Cheryl Schmitz. “They generously give
of their time and talents to engage residents and
participants and enhance services at Luther Manor,
Lakefield and River Oak communities.”
Almost 500 volunteers give of their time and talent
to Luther Manor annually. Those approaching
special volunteer service milestones were honored
at the banquet. Luther Manor President and CEO
Stephanie Chedid presented pins to the honorees
who were recognized for achieving volunteer
milestones starting at 500 and exceeding 30,000 hours
of service.
Terrace resident Nancy Matton reached a service
milestone of 25,000 hours and there were three new
volunteers who joined the 10,000 hour club, community
volunteers Nancy Becher and Miloudi Elafess, and
Terrace resident Orville Treptow. Other honorees
included Donald Koehler, Barbara Mohr and Alice
Wagner who were recognized for reaching milestones of
5,000 service hours. Alva Heup received special recognition
for celebrating not only her 500-hour volunteer milestone,
but also her 100th
birthday this year.
In addition to celebrating service milestones, every year,
staff members nominate volunteers who have gone
above and beyond the call of duty for a special honor:
the Good Samaritan Award. This year’s recipients were
Tammy Kuepper, who volunteers in the Transitional
Care Rehabilitation Center and Health Care Center, and
Kay Fitch, who serves in the Courtyards.
Volunteer banquet special guests included United Lutheran
Program for the Aging Board officers, Chair Dale Kirchner,
Assistant Secretary Stephen Knowles, and Treasurer Larry Nines.
For more information about volunteer opportunities at Luther Manor, contact Volunteer
Services at (414) 464-3880 ext. 600/577 or email volunteer@luthermanor.org. g
Nancy Becher and Miloudi Elafess, pictured with
President/CEO Stephanie Chedid reached the
10,000 hour milestone.
2015 Good
Samaritan Awardrecipients
Barb Mohr, with Chedid, was
honored for 5,000+ service
hours.
- 15 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
hand
a helping
Student
Volunteers
Lend
One year ago, Luther Manor
Volunteer Services thought hard
about what student volunteers do
in our senior community over the
summer months. This is what we
decided: in most cases, student
volunteers serve with their hands
at Luther Manor. They escort older
adults in wheelchairs, serve coffee,
scoop ice cream, roll tickets, move
walkers at the Milwaukee Brewers
game, score Wii games, cut and
create cards, do manicures, provide
computer and clerical assistance,
dig in gardens, mix and bake and
help with recipes, sew crafts, play
cards and games, and probably
much more!
“ ”
I learnedthat the
elderly have great
stories and are full of so
much knowledge.
– Bella Vang
Since the beginning of 2015, 61 new
student volunteers have walked
through Luther Manor’s doors and
blessed our older adults with time
and talent. That’s in addition to the
90-plus returning student volunteers,
12-years-old to college-age.
Our student volunteers come from
Milwaukee, Waukesha, Ozaukee,
Walworth and Washington counties.
“ ”
I gainedlots of wisdom
from the residents and
learned to communicate
much better.
– Johnna Odom
Student volunteers represent
many different schools, including
Milwaukee Lutheran, Divine
Savior Holy Angels, Milwaukee
School of Languages, Rufus
King, Wauwatosa High Schools
and many more. They bring
gifts of rich cultural heritage
and tradition, music, and always
respect for older adults.
It has been a busy, bustling
summer with the addition of
dozens of young people to our
building. Some of the students we
will continue to see, as time allows,
during their academic year.
We have been blessed, and they
have been a blessing. Thanks,
Luther Manor student volunteers,
for lending a hand this summer!
A round of
applause
for our volunteers
Simone Tatum was a recipient
of a $5,000 college scholarship from
National Heritage Academy.
Johnna Odom was accepted to
the school of pharmacy at Hampton
University in Virginia.
Zaynab Hassan was the recipient
of a four-year Burke Scholarship for
Marquette University.
Lois Port was recognized for 25
years and 13,000 hours of volunteer
service at Columbia St. Mary’s
Hospital.
Barbara Jordan took first place for
her quilt at the Waukesha County Fair
and State Fair.
Jeannette Ingabire, Ana
Mercado, and Breanna Rady
received four-year Caroline
Scholarships at Mt. Mary
University. g
- 16 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
There is always
something
you can do.
”“
Some say age is nothing but a number – but in the case of Terrace
resident and Luther Manor volunteer Alva Heup it is a great source
of pride.
When asked about her age, Heup
proudly declares, “I am 100 years old.”
And she has the swag to prove it.
Heup can often be seen wearing a favorite T-shirt, which reads,
“Born in the USA…A Long, Long, Time Ago.” But with her
infectious laugh, indomitable spirit, and the big smile she wears for
all she meets, the T-shirt is hardly her most memorable accessory.
While achieving centenarian status is impressive, it is only one of
Heup’s accomplishments this year. She recently reached a Luther
Manor volunteer milestone of 500 service hours.
“She is definitely a role model for all of us,” said Cheryl Schmitz,
Director of Volunteer Services. “It was a privilege to honor her at
the Volunteer Banquet in April for her milestone accomplishment
of volunteer service at the amazing age of 100.”
Heup jokingly attributes her healthy longevity to her “stubborn
Norwegian” background. Never the wallflower, Heup said
volunteering is just another way for her to be social.
“I like people,” she said.
Born on a farm in Dodgeville on Feb. 20, 1915, Heup’s life wasn’t
an easy one. Heup’s mother died when she was very young,
after the birth of her sister. The girls were sent to live with their
grandmother, who was already caring for 10 children. Heup
attended a one-room schoolhouse in Highland.
Heup learned how to take care of a household, and chores
like cleaning and washing. Her first job was working for a
preacher’s family in Dodgeville. When the preacher was called
Alva Heup
No signs of slowing down
Volunteer hits impressive milestones
- 17 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
to another church, she
came with him and
his family to Sturgeon
Bay, where she lived
for a year. When
she was 22 years
old, Heup moved
to Milwaukee. Her
days were spent
working at Oster Manufacturing
and her nights dancing away at the Eagles
Ballroom. That was where she met Frank Heup.
Alva and Frank were married on Jan. 18, 1938.
They had a daughter named Carol and joined
Covenant Lutheran Church. During her life, Heup
has belonged to many different service groups,
including the Covenant Ladies Society and the
Milwaukee Lutheran High School Ladies Guild.
She also volunteered at the Wellington Park Senior
Center. Given her history of service, it is little
surprise that Heup eventually became a volunteer
at Luther Manor.
“Alva began her volunteer service in March 2011 at
age 96,” said Schmitz, “She is a delightful addition
to the Den of Antiquity team and the Manor Mart!
Her positive outlook on life and good sense of humor
make her a welcome addition to Volunteer Services.”
Heup also serves as a Terrace Welcome
Representative, warmly greeting residents to their
new Luther Manor home.
Never afraid to try new things, in 2014, Heup took
her turn on the runway for a Friends of Luther
Manor Fashion Show that highlighted clothing
items from the Den of Antiquity. Then 99, Heup
wore a Badgley-Mishka dress and had photos
snapped to send to her cousin in California.
“He gets a kick out the things I do,” she said. “He
likes to know what is going on at Luther Manor.”
Heup hopes her story encourages people to join
her in volunteering and not put limitations – age or
otherwise – on what they can contribute to the world.
“There is always something you can do,”
she said. g
NEEDS
Volunteers
Luther Manor
Coffee Cart Hostess/Host
Choice of week days
9:30 - 11 a.m.
Deliver coffee and cookies
while enjoying conversation
with residents in Luther
Manor’s Health Care Center.
Ice Cream Parlor Clerk
Choice of week days
1:45 - 4:15 p.m.
Serve treats in a retro-themed
Ice Cream Parlor to older
adults, their families and
guests.
Den of Antiquity Shop Clerk
Choice of Tuesdays/Thursdays
Flexible shifts between
9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Volunteer in a resale
environment to raise funds for
the Luther Manor Foundation.
Luther Manor/HealthReach
Therapy Transporter
Choice of week days
8:45 a.m. - noon
or 12:30 - 3 p.m.
Provide wheelchair transport
to/from campus therapy
appointments. This is a great
source of exercise!
Have fun serving as...
Please consider giving your gift of time to those who truly
need it.
Contact Volunteer Services at (414) 464-3880 ext. 600/577
or volunteer@luthermanor.org. g
Memorial Gifts
- 18 -
There are many more opportunities to give beyond what is listed above. Please contact Mary Kanavas, Resource
Development Officer, at (414) 464-3880, ext. 462, to find out more about any of the current funding needs, or to
discuss how you might contribute to another worthwhile cause. Thank you for your prayerful consideration.
Opportunities to giveOpportunities to give
Elevated Garden Beds
For the Terrace & Lakefield Adult
Day Services
There are many benefits of raised-
bed gardening. Elevated beds enable
residents to grow small plots of
flowers and vegetables. They are
space conscious, visually attractive
and reduce back strain because they
are elevated. $300 each
Recumbent Exercise Bikes
For the Terrace Fitness Center
The old exercise bikes in the Fitness
Center are difficult to use and
outdated. Recumbent exercise bikes
are a safer and easier alternative.
$800 each
Portable CD/Karaoke Machine
For Wauwatosa Adult Day Services
Musical activities are a fun way for
Adult Day Services participants to
express themselves, be creative and
interact.
Portable CD/Radio Player $50
Karaoke Machine $200
Light Grow Shelves
For Wauwatosa Adult Day Services
Light grow shelves will enable
Adult Day Services participants to
plant and grow herbs and spices to
harvest. $450
iPad
For Lakefield Adult Day Services
Portable technology enhances one-
on-one engagement, particularly
with dementia participants. $500
MTS SureSeal Manual Sealer
For the pharmacy
This machine is used to package all
medications into unit dose form for
delivery to patients. $1,100
Safety Beds
For the Transitional Care
Rehabilitation Center
Safety for the patient and staff is
addressed with the updated features
found on these wider beds. (4)
$2,450 per bed
Continuous Passive Motion
Machine (CPM)
For the Transitional Care
Rehabilitation Center
This machine is used after knee
replacement surgery. It consistently
and gently flexes and extends the
knee joint in a slowed controlled
movement. $2,150
Sequential Compression
Device (SCD)
For the Transitional Care
Rehabilitation Center
This machine is designed to decrease
the development of blood clots
and peripheral edema for those
whose mobility is limited while
recuperating from surgery or injury.
$950 per machine
Screens
For the Park Terrace Dining Room
(2) $1,200 each
HD Projector
For the Park Terrace Dining Room
(2) $3,000 per machine
47” Flat Screen TV
For Lakefield Adult Day Services
A flat screen TV would replace a
cumbersome and outdated box
television. It would be easy to move
and compatible with other modern
devices like DVD players. $500
Broda Chair
For the Health Care Center
A Broda chair is used in place
of a wheelchair. It has comfort
tension seating which helps
prevent pressure and creates long
term comfort. The chair offers
infinitely adjustable tilt and recline
adjustments. $2,000-$3,400
60” Flat Screen TV
For the Terrace & Health Care
Center
Old box televisions are in need of
update in two popular resident
gathering areas, Grandpa’s Parlor in
the HCC, and the Exercise Center in
the Terrace. $1,500 each
Lift Chair
For the Health Care Center,
Transitional Care Rehabilitation
Center, and the Courtyards
Lift chairs feature a powered lifting
mechanism that pushes the entire
chair up from its base and assists
a person to move to a standing
position. $1,000 each
Chair Scale
For the Health Care Center
These chair scales enable a resident
to sit and have their weight taken.
$900
- 19 -
Memorial Gifts
Many individuals choose to memorialize their loved ones by making
contributions to the Luther Manor Foundation. We recognize and celebrate
those in whose memory gifts to Luther Manor have been given. Those who have
been memorialized are listed below in bold-faced type and are followed by the
names of the donor(s). The following memorial gifts were received between Feb.
1, 2015 through July 31, 2015.
If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact the Resource
Development Office at (414) 464-3880, email give@luthermanor.org, or use
the gift envelope included in this issue of The Messenger.
Virginia Ahrens
B. H. Lohr
Grace Alpert
Barbara Alpert
Ken Andeen
Martha Andeen
Our Parents & Sister
Bill & Nancy Bagemihl
Bud & Diana Baker
Dr. & Mrs. Stephen Baker
Maria Mariann Bauer
Chris M. Bauer
Sarah Bauer
Joan R. Boland
Pamela Jo Brown
Mr. & Mrs. David F. Dostal
Mr. & Mrs. John R. Evans
Mr. & Mrs. Ralph M. Hasler
Charlie, Teresa & Hannah Jackson
Mr. & Mrs. Roger H. Johnson
Patricia M. Kemp
Walter Koeniger
William O. McCormack
Lois Nordholm
Gerry & Pat Ostermick
Diane F. Pellegrin
Lindy M. Pritzl
Mr. & Mrs. John Sirovina
Brent Taylor
Jacob & Carole Taylor
Mr. & Mrs. Michael W. Weber
Richard Benz
Mary Ann Abrahamson
Mr. & Mrs. Bert Hartinger
Joan G. Heyne
Richard Bertram
Nancy Becher & Miloudi Elafess
Kevin Birk
Nancy Becher & Miloudi Elafess
Robert Budnik
Mrs. Michael Kelingos
Mr. & Mrs. Herbert F. Scogg
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Trotter
Alice Brunelli
Sally Gallatin
Dolores Korbel
Gloria Schmeling
Cheryl Schmitz
Lori J. Schultz
Patricia H. Warth
Son, Jim & Husband, Harry
Jan Bruskewitz
Irma Bruss
Naomi R. Knoll
Eugene F. Bussian
Alice Knickelbine
Rev. David Patterson
Russ Chambers
Gerry & Judy Beuk & T2
Ruth Cloninger
Anonymous
Mary Coogan
Frank Coogan
Ed & Dena Custer
Marie Custer
Michael E. Dillett
Dillett Mechanical Service, Inc.
Marcella Dixon
Claire Moe
Alda Dowdle
Rick Dowdle
Joyce Egerer
John & Kathy Barkow
Lucille Eggert
Donald Eggert
Shirley’s Mother, Virginia Einem
Richard & Shirley Behrendt
Alternating Pressure/Low
Air Therapy Mattresses
For the Transitional Care
Rehabilitation Center
These mattresses are used for
residents with skin issues or
potential for skin issues related to
pressure. $3,000-$4,000.
American Flag and Stand
For Pastoral Care
The flag of the United States is
displayed during worship services
on national holidays and special
events as a way of giving thanks to
God for the blessings of living in
America. $500
HD camera
For the Lippold Faith and
Education Center
A second camera would enhance
the broadcasts of worship
services and other programs that
are watched by residents in the
comfort of their rooms for whom it
is difficult to get out. $2,000
”
”
“
“Give Humbly
But when you give, do not
announce it with trumpets, to be
honored by others.
- Matthew 6:2
Give to support the needy
Contribute to the needs
of the saints.
- Romans 12:13
Memorial Gifts
- 20 -
Wilma Georg
Carol Dilthey
C. “Mac” Geyer
Lynne Cole
Agnes Gilberts
Dick & Kathy Adix
Martha Andeen
Eleanor Ciurro
Mr. & Mrs. Mark F. Conrad
Cross of Life Lutheran Church
Mr. & Mrs. Harold A. Daus
Marjorie Davis
Virginia Dietzler
Barbara Eberly
Mr. & Mrs. Douglas A. Ehrick
Mr. & Mrs. Mike Geraets
Alice Gruell
Don & Jolene Hansen
Warren & Inga Harwick
Bernice M. Heimerl
Marcella R. Heimerl
Joan G. Heyne
Mr. & Mrs. James Irwin
Margy S. Jernberg
Joan E. Johnson
Rae J. Kara
John & Doris Keller
Mr. & Mrs. Leslie L. Kingsbury
Dolores Korbel
Kristi Kothrade
Carole E. LaFond
Gloria Larson
Ele Lindgren
Dick & Betty Mattson
Mr. & Mrs. Mark F. Nelson
Jean H. Novotny
Al & Edna Peterson
Kathy Rovenko
Mr. & Mrs. Dick Sonstegard
Joyce M. Stibbe
Marian Q. Thielke
Jim Thunes
Mary P. Watts
Beth E. Wickert
Mr. & Mrs. Brian J. Wickert
Mr. & Mrs. David V. Wickert
Mr. & Mrs. Frank C. Wickert
Marilyn E. Zimmermann
Ernie Gilberts
Cross of Life Lutheran Church
Harold Guenther
Lorraine Guenther
Edna Gula
Kathleen Conrad
Peter Gula
Kathleen Conrad
Lydia Gutekunst
William C. Gutekunst
Muggy Hanson
Nancy Becher & Miloudi Elafess
Warren J. Harwick
Mary Ann Abrahamson
Martha Andeen
Dorothy Bauer
Larry Eleanor Beckman
Mr. & Mrs. John F. Behm
Janet Beltman
Mr. & Mrs. Dudley Blank
Shirley Burmeister
Ciske/Schlichtholz Family
Eleanor Ciurro
Dr. & Mrs. Denis Cortese
Cathy & Edward David & Family
Marjorie Davis
Rev. Ronald G. Froehich
Lois Goerlinger
Joan G. Heyne
Mr. & Mrs. Carl P. Hoppe
Mr. & Mrs. Erik Huth
Mr. & Mrs. J. Paul Jacobson
Marjorie Jothen
Rea Katz & Richard Bartlein
John & Doris Keller
Alice Knickelbine
Joanne Krause
Gloria Larson
Dick & Betty Mattson
Richard & Karen Merklein
Janet Neu
Jean H. Novotny
Jean M. Rosier
Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Ross
Mr. & Mrs. Tom Simpson
Marian Q. Thielke
Jim Thunes
Thomas Vanderbilt
Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Walker
My Parents
Paul M. Heck
Mariane Heidel
Katherine M. Jastromski
Edward & Edna Heimerl
Bernice M. Heimerl
Marcella R. Heimerl
Myrtle Held
John & Chris Kosma
Hajja Mahjouba Elafess
Lori J. Schultz
Harold E. & Margaret F. Fahning
Donald R. & Sandra L. Fahning
Virginia Fauber
James & Sharon Bertrand
Mr. & Mrs. Perry Brewer
Charles & Marianne Daliege
Ronald Daliege
Dennis & Patricia Daniels
Marie Dupuis & Peter Westergard
Linda Edmondson
Alan Johnson
Margaret Jonas
Mr. & Mrs. John Plusch
Thomas Floryance
Sharon Floryance
Vernon Foshager
Martha Andeen
Kathleen M. Budahl
Mr. & Mrs. Stuart C. Gale
Katherine M. Jastromski
Al & Edna Peterson
Dr. & Mrs. Frederick A. Pflughoeft
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Dr. & Mrs. George E. Rooney
Grace Teslik
Jim Thunes
Viola Frank
James Frank
Lois Freitag
Martha Andeen
Larry & Eleanor Beckman
Janet Beltman
Gerald R. Brauns
Inga Harwick
Arline G. Henkel
Bernice Herman
Mr. & Mrs. Michael Miller
Mr. Mrs. Carl Posbrig
Jean Price
Bob & Ann Rantanen
Cheryl Schmitz
June Skokon
Bonnie Vick
The Wagner Companies
Mr. & Mrs. John Zima
Melvin & Bodil Frick
Sandra L. Menzel
Viola Gamradt
Mr. & Mrs. Frank Wallner
- 21 -
Memorial Gifts
Lillian Leverenz
Elmer E. Schultz
Deceased Friends from Luther
Manor
Maury & Gloria Weinhold
Sonja Maas
Mr. & Mrs. Mark F. Conrad
Duane Maas
Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Monty
Mr. & Mrs. Grant Wiedenhoeft
Floyd J. Mann
Arlene G. Mann
Esther G. May
Howard & Beverly Reoch
Clarice McConnell
Tom McConnell
Lucille Moll
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Sr. Rose J. Kroeger
Cheryl Schmitz
Jeremy Monnett
Nancy Becher & Miloudi Elafess
G. H. Mortag
B. R. Mortag
Gladys Mortag
Judith Oehler
Kenneth Mueller
Anonymous
Lucille Mueller
Mary Beth Bunnow
Mr. & Mrs. Rino Clissa
Janet E. Engel
Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Engel
Mr. Mrs. Eugene J. Flory
Elaine L. Hall
Roger C. Harry
Betty J. Hjerstedt
Constance Y. Kling
Mr. Mrs. Joseph A. Potzner
Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Ripley
Andy & Janet Slater
Harriet Nehmer
Violet Baumgart
Dorothy O’Brien
Daniel F. Ring
Marilynn Ring
Kathleen O’Callaghan
Marilyn Bub
Alois & Meta Otzelberger
Robert A. Otzelberger
Brothers, Carl, George, Herbert &
Gregory
Robert A. Otzelberger
Marion L. Paape
Caryl J. Paape
Eileen Pfeffer
Rosemary Bell
Mr. & Mrs. Fred C. Callies
Wally & Diane Hogan
Susan & David Keller
Sue Lawrence
John & Jean Miller
Birdell Orlebeke
Mary B. Parker
Rev. David Patterson
Mary Pfeffer
Paul Pfeffer
Roberta, Steven & Zachary Pratt
Joyce M. Stibbe
Tom & Sharon Tradewell
Orville Treptow
Steven Picciolo
Janet Beltman
Gloria Larson
Ruth Militzer
Bob & Audrey Richter
Rudolph Porchetta
Nancy Becher & Miloudi Elafess
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Rev. David Patterson
Ada Quintenz
Mr. & Mrs. Donald Quintenz
Grethe Rawling
Kenneth J. Rawling
Alice L. Richter
Anonymous
Carl & Kay Richter
Ruth Rudolph
Mr. & Mrs. Lucas Brunmeier
Mr. & Mrs. Michael Chang
Lyle E. Drier
Jean L. Elzinga
Mr. & Mrs. Mark Goldner
Kathleen A. Grimm
Randy & Barbara Guyer
Ruth Hartwig
Mr. & Mrs. Craig O. Henes
Marjorie Jothen
Shirley Koenitzer
Verna Held
Marie E. Weiss
Henrietta Heumann
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas C. Heumann
Ruth Heup
Larry Heup
Elsie Holmgren
Joan G. Heyne
Marjorie Jothen
Dick & Betty Mattson
Averle Hubbard
Susan Hubbard
Henry & Viola Jensen
Steve & Debbie Jensen
Genevieve Johnson
Ginni Verthein
Lydia C. Judd
Judy M. Judd
Belle & Oscar Jung
Joyce Heinrich
Darlyn Katt
L. Lee Katt
Jean Klaas
David J. Beinlich
Kate Bertram
Bette Diehl
Luanne M. Schmidt
Katie Tillmar
Erika J. Tole
Elmer “Nick” Knickelbine
Kay E. Fenico
Leslie H. Krause
Germaine Krause
Raymond J. Krueger & Bonnie Krueger
Kent K. Krueger
Kenneth Kruger
Lucille L. Farwig
Margaret Laun
Daniel F. Ring
Doris Lauterbach
Mary Ann Abrahamson
Janet Beltman
Linda Glubka
Inga Harwick
Joyce Heinrich
Mr. & Mrs. Erik Huth
Contance Y. Kling
Shirley Koenitzer
Memorial Gifts
- 22 -
Mr. & Mrs. Leon A. Krueger
Becky S. Kunkler
Elaine Lindstrom
Mr. & Mrs. Anthony McGinitty
Merit Title LLC
Mr. & Mrs. Carl Penner
Cheryl Schmitz
Mr. & Mrs. John Schwendel
Dolores M. Stowasser
Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Streng
Mr. & Mrs. Eappen Thomas
Orville Treptow
Mr. & Mrs. William Van Valzah
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Welch
Karen H. Westfahl
Enid F. Wolf
Mr. & Mrs. Walter A. Zube
Virginia Ruplinger
Mary E. Vettel
Russ & Marion Rutter
Russ & Margaret Rutter
Doris Schier
Kathleen S. Schier
Sheila Zenner
Emily Schillinger
Jean Morack
Earl H. Schlief
Janet Beltman
Bruce E. Schneider
Mr. & Mrs. Conrad Heinzel
Birdice J. Schultz
Teri L. Fleming
Mary Schumann
Cheryl Schmitz
Astrid Schumell
Rev. John H. Schumell
Harriet Shumway
Alfred E. Shumway
Gwenn Simonson
Linda Kautz
Bonnie Lyons
William Simpson
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Our Parents & Step-Mom
Ron & Kathy Sonntag
Helen Sorensen
Mark R. Sorensen
Hope Steldt
Bonnie Vick
Hazel S. Stoller
Mr. & Mrs. Gordon Fritsche
Louise Stoner
A. Christine Adams
Mr. & Mrs. William Arnold
Carn M. Bade
Jean E. Bauhs
Barbara Cardo
Barb Donohue
Gerald T. Frank
Mr. & Mrs. Ronald M. Groeschl
Nancy & Mike Hansen
Mr. & Mrs. Marty Larsen, Jr.
Karen M. LeSage
John Miota
Jean M. Rosier
Dolores A. Schiefelbein
Mr. & Mrs. Keith A. Schmidt
Mr. & Mrs. Charles F. Schultz
Jeanette A. Schultz
Mr. & Mrs. Donald Sneider
Sue Starker & Judy Filut
Joseph A. Stiletti
Betty J. Wicht
Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Zunk
Connie Sweet
Roberta, Steven & Zachary Pratt
Ruth Swessel
Cathy Swessel
Maryanne Szyjakowski
Beverly Hess
Cheryl Schmitz
Wanda Tischner
Jill Lindberg
Hazel Trede
Ralph Trede
Davies & Van Eerden Parents
Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Van Eerden, Sr.
Norma Warmie
Martha Andeen
Mr. & Mrs. Donald W. Anderson
Bill & Nancy Bagemihl
Sherry L. Boyd
Mr. & Mrs. Rolf Ekstrand
Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Ellingson
Margie Floyd
Sharon J. Halpin
Joan G. Heyne
Connie Johnson
Marjorie Jothen
Dolores Korbel
Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Kramer
Noryanne Lahl
Nancy Matton
Kevin Meissner
Jean M. Moberg
Jean H. Novotny
Mr. & Mrs. Mike Othrow
Rev. & Mrs. David Patterson
Patricia A. Reynolds
Gloria Schmeling
Lori J. Schultz
Marian Q. Thielke
Carol Wichmann
Ardvie Wegner
Lucille L. Farwig
Betty Weisel
Pam Weisel
Roy Weltzien
Aretas O. Bayley
Debra Dixon
Bonnie Fredrick
Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Graetz
LeeAnn Himebauch
Lou Ann Madson
Mr. & Mrs. Michael R. Niver
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Reich
Gertrude E. Scholz
Mr. & Mrs. Norman L. Schultz
Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd Steinkamp
Mr. & Mrs. Walter K. Unglaub
Don L. Weltzien
Ruth Zirwes
Betty A. Trampe
Kenneth Zweifel
Roberta J. Pratt
Mark & Cheryl Schmitz
”“Give to bring glory to God
Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above
- James 1:17
- 23 -
ribute GiftsTThe following individuals were honored by their families and friends. Tribute gifts serve to commemorate birthdays,
wedding anniversaries or other special occasions or simply to show appreciation for a friendship or act of kindness.
Those who have been honored through a gift to Luther Manor are listed below in bold-faced type and are followed by
the names of the donor(s). The following tribute gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2015 through July 31, 2015.
If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact the Resource Development Office at (414) 464-3880, email
give@luthermanor.org, or use the gift envelope included in this issue of The Messenger.
Adeline Amberg’s Birthday
Gloria Schmeling
Bert Ammentorp
Rich Ammentorp
Martha Andeen
The Hughes Family
Inga Harwick
Warren R. Stumpe
Alva Heup’s 100th Birthday
Joanne Krause
17 Grandchildren & 17 Great-
Grandchildren
John & Doris Keller
Alice Knickelbine
Mr. & Mrs. Gordon A. Hatcher
Marianne Koehler’s Birthday
Carol Paulson
Mary Ann Russom
Cheryl Schmitz
Chris & Lori Schultz
Beverly Thompson
Alan Turner
My Family
Sr. Rose Kroeger
Sr. Rose Kroeger
Robert & Ellen Bladorn
Rev. Wm. H. & Nancy Truby
Lillian Love
Eric A. Love
An act of kindness from Luther
Manor staff person
Robert A. Otzelberger
Betty Mattson’s Birthday
Sharon D. Odahl
Rev. David Patterson
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Joyce Heinrich
he Hope Society GiftsT
The Hope Society is a program that offers friends and family a way to
remember their loved one(s) with a gift to the Luther Manor Hospice
program. Those who have been memorialized are listed below in bold-faced
type and are followed by the names of the donor(s). The following Hope
Society gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2015 through July 31, 2015.
If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact the
Resource Development Office at (414) 464-3880, or give@luthermanor.org.
Joyce Egerer
John & Kathy Barkow
Joseph Heller
Gary Bishop
Mr. & Mrs. Donald Earnest
Mr. & Mrs. Charles D. Kenas
Mr. & Mrs. William H. Klink
Mr. & Mrs. Roland D. Liske
Diane Nissler
Mr. & Mrs. Jay Paunovich
Rudolph Porchetta
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Mr. & Mrs. T. Turner
Roberta Pratt & Orville Treptow for
rendered services in Manor Mart
Dorothy & Gene Treptow
Luanne Schmidt
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Cheryl Schmitz
Ann Towell
Adeline Amberg
Marilyn Arndt
Gloria Schmeling
Rusty Tym
Sharon Novak-Tym
The Luther Manor Foundation
was created in 1985 as a charitable
nonprofit organization to provide
financial support for Luther Manor’s
ministry. The 2015/2016 Luther
Manor Foundation Board of Directors
include:
Fred Anderson, Treasurer
Thomas Buck, Chair
Gwen Jackson
William Pickering, Secretary
Amy Sarles
John Silseth, Immediate Past Chair
The Messenger is published periodically
by Luther Manor, a ministry of the
United Lutheran Program for the Aging.
Comments and suggestions regarding
this publication are always welcome.
Contact the Luther Manor Resource
Development office at:
4545 N. 92nd
Street
Wauwatosa, WI 53225
(414) 464-3880
give@luthermanor.org
www.luthermanor.org
The content provided in The Messenger
is intended only to be informational.
The Luther Manor Foundation does
not render legal, tax or other financial
advisory services. For assistance with
your specific situation, professional
services should be sought.
A ministry of the United Lutheran Program for the Aging
4545 N. 92nd Street • Wauwatosa, WI 53225
As a nonprofit, faith-based organization and one of the finest senior living communities in Southeastern
Wisconsin, Luther Manor has been caring and advocating for seniors for more than 50 years. Our
mission is to share God’s love by enriching the lives of older adults through excellent housing, care
and services. In addition to retirement housing, assisted living and long-term care options, we offer
rehabilitation services, adult day services, hospice care and community outreach programs.
Guided by our Christian heritage and values, we consistently strive to exceed the expectations of those
we serve. You can count on our commitment and reputation when selecting housing or health care
services for yourself or someone you love.
If you would like to make a contribution to help support any of the programs or services the Luther
Manor community offers, please contact the Resource Development Office at (414) 464-3880, ext. 447 or
give@luthermanor.org.

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Writing Sample 2

  • 1. Fall/Winter 2015 VOL. 25 a publication for donors, volunteers, and friends of Luther Manor Fall/Winter 2015 VOL. 25 a publication for donors, volunteers, and friends of Luther Manor You are an important PIECE of Luther Manor Your gifts and talents make Luther Manor whole Volunteer hits impressive milestones At 100, Alva Heup shows no signs of slowing down A place for families Donors fund Sacred Space
  • 2. Greetings donors, volunteers and partners, This fall, we are excited to celebrate a special milestone in Luther Manor’s history, the 30th anniversary of the Luther Manor Foundation. The Luther Manor Foundation was established to ensure long-term financial support for Luther Manor’s most vulnerable residents through the Resident Support Fund. Thanks to the foresight of Luther Manor’s Board of Directors and donors like you, no resident has ever been asked to leave due to his or her inability to fully fund care and services. Your continued support is critical to the fulfillment of our mission. Donations to the Luther Manor Foundation are one of many ways you are making a difference in the Luther Manor community, and helping to enrich the lives of older adults through excellent housing, care and services. In this issue of The Messenger, we draw the comparison of Luther Manor to a puzzle. Many pieces need to fit together in order for Luther Manor’s mission to be realized and to complete the puzzle. These pieces include: project donations, seasonal appeals, in-kind donations, tribute/memorial gifts, gifts of service, and fundraising. We continue to look to you —our donors, volunteers, and partners —to be a piece of the puzzle; to work with our professionals in Resource Development and Volunteer Services to find the giving and service opportunities that fit your personal preferences and values. As anyone who has ever assembled a jigsaw puzzle knows, every piece is vitally important. While we may have different strategies for completing a puzzle, it’s incomplete if even one piece is missing. We depend on your generosity and your talents to complete our Luther Manor puzzle. We are thankful for our many donors and volunteers who have contributed to the realization of Luther Manor’s mission over the past three decades, from the board members who established the Foundation to the youth volunteers who pitch in over the summer. Everyone has a role to play; everyone is a piece of our puzzle. Thank you for your continued support of Luther Manor. Sincerely, Stephanie Chedid, President and CEO On the cover Volunteer and donor Larry Nines provides Luther Manor with many gifts. Read about how he and others make a difference on page 4. You you. puzzle others life. are a piece of the of someone elses You may never know where you fit, but will fill the holes in their lives with pieces of - Bonnie Arbon
  • 3. - 3 -- 3 - supporters Luther Manor th Anniversary H appy Luther Manor is incredibly fortunate to have a foundation that supports our mission. ”“ Luther Manor is celebrating a special milestone this fall: the 30th anniversary of the Luther Manor Foundation. The Luther Manor Foundation was formed in 1985 with the mission of ensuring long-term financial support for Luther Manor’s ministry to share God’s love with older adults, specifically by providing financial assistance to the most vulnerable residents – those who have outlived their assets and can no longer afford their care. Over the past three decades, the Luther Manor Foundation has given more than $6.6 million in resident support and an additional $3.8 million in other grants to the United Lutheran Program for the Aging, according to Luther Manor Chief Financial Officer Elizabeth Diehl. Meanwhile, the corpus of $15.9 million remains preserved. “Luther Manor is incredibly fortunate to have a Foundation that supports our mission,” said Luther Manor President and CEO Stephanie Chedid. “It truly reflects the compassion and generosity of those donors who have firsthand knowledge of our good work and those who give in support of our overall mission.” Only the income earned on the principal, or corpus, of the Luther Manor Foundation is used to provide resident support. “That the Luther Manor Foundation has been able to meet the ULPA requests every year and that the principal is still intact is quite an accomplishment,” said Foundation Board member Fred Anderson. Anderson has served on the Luther Manor Foundation Board for more than 10 years. While it’s hard to know how many residents have been helped by the Foundation over the past 30 years, Diehl said each year in recent years, about 40 residents in the Courtyards have benefited from the generosity of the Foundation. “We have seen health care costs rise at a rate much higher than the economy and definitely higher than the reimbursement rates we receive from government payer sources like Medicare and Medicaid,” Chedid said. “The Foundation helps close the gap between the cost of our services and what we are paid for the services.” Chedid said she expects the Foundation will continue to play an important role in Luther Manor’s ability to fulfill its mission, and, in fact, will take on a bigger role. “We are in the midst of a search for a new Foundation Director to guide us and help us grow and in turn help Luther Manor deliver more mission,” Chedid said. “Under the leadership of the Foundation Board’s Chair, Tom Buck, we are also restructuring to help fuel and ignite the passion in our current and future donors. Luther Manor is a special community and through the Foundation’s support we will continue to be so well into the future.” To make a donation to the Luther Manor Foundation, contact Resource Development at (414) 464-3880. g Providing resident support for 30 years Luther Manor celebrates Foundation milestone
  • 4. - 4 - supporters Luther Manor On a pleasant summer day, a group of men from the Luther Manor Courtyards and the Men’s Club of St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Waukesha discuss beanbag toss strategy and joke as they enjoy an afternoon of yard games and fellowship at Retzer Nature Center. For the past three years, the two men’s clubs have been meeting several times a year for a joint activity. and CEO David Keller invited him to serve on the United Lutheran Program for the Aging Board of Directors. Over the years, Nines has expanded his volunteerism at Luther Manor to include the Men’s Club partnership, the Employee Family event and the the Resource Development Thank A Thon; eventually he became a donor, as well. “If you invest your time and your talent in an organization, the third logical piece is treasure,” Nines said. “By not involving all three components it would be like not giving my best. I think it can happen in any order. You get involved in one way or another and then expand that connection, where possible, to other areas.” Nines participates in the annual giving campaigns, and is a member of the Heritage Partner Society, a planned giving group whose members have included Luther Manor in their estate planning. “Beyond the staff members who keep Luther Manor running by providing the basic services and programs to residents and participants, we rely tremendously on donors and volunteers,” said Luther Manor Resource Development Officer Mary Kanavas. “Luther Manor, in many ways, is like a puzzle in that we depend on many individual pieces to fit together to help us fulfill our mission or complete the puzzle.” Donors and volunteers like Nines provide important pieces of the puzzle by supporting specific projects beyond the operating budget, Are you the missing piece? Find the right fit for your gifts and talents at Luther Manor “It’s great for my male residents, because men are outnumbered in the Courtyards 4 to 1,” said Courtyards Life Enrichment Specialist Mark Mrozek. “It’s a refreshing change for them to be able to spend time with other men and get in touch with that aspect of their humanity.” Larry Nines, a Luther Manor volunteer and member of the Men’s Ministry at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, spearheaded the effort to bring the two groups together. “All too often, a church men’s group is just a Saturday morning breakfast or a Sunday morning Bible Study – it’s not about spreading goodwill or the message of the church,” Nines said. “Giving men an opportunity to share their time and their interests with others is really a key component to what men’s ministry should be.” Nines has had a long relationship with Luther Manor that started during his professional life when he worked for the State of Wisconsin. He helped nonprofit health and educational providers, including Luther Manor, take advantage of tax- exempt financial borrowing opportunities. When he retired, then-Luther Manor President Larry Nines and wife, Vicki
  • 5. - 5 -- 5 - supporters Luther Manor I believe in Luther Manor. ”“ making tribute and memorial gifts, responding to seasonal appeals, offering in-kind donations, and providing gifts of time and talent. “Larry Nines is a great supporter of the Luther Manor community through his many and varied roles,” said Cheryl Schmitz, Director of Volunteer Services. “Larry came on board as a Luther Manor volunteer in October 2012, providing communion distribution in the Adult Day Services and Health Care Center. Larry and his wife, Vicki, also serve as Friends of Luther Manor keypersons representing St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Waukesha.” Others who have added multiple pieces to the puzzle are Inga Harwick and her daughter Viki Olsen. Inga and her husband, Warren, became familiar with Luther Manor when they were members of Fox Point Lutheran Church, the ULPA’s founding congregation. Inga did craft volunteering in the early years and her mother, Emma Marlin, came to live in the Courtyards in 1984. The Harwicks moved from Milwaukee for a few years, and on their return joined Lake Park Lutheran Church. To show their support of Luther Manor, the Harwicks included Luther Manor in their charitable giving and are members of the Heritage Partner Society. To show their support of Luther Manor, the Harwicks took out two charitable gift annuities and in doing so became members of the Heritage Partner Society. The Harwicks became Luther Manor residents themselves in 2008, with Inga moving into the Terrace and Warren into the Special Care Center. At that point, Inga discovered other pieces of the puzzle that she could provide. “She began her volunteer service in May 2009 and has generously gifted the Luther Manor community with over 1,182 hours of volunteer service using her creative talents with the Terrace Bazaar crafters,” said Schmitz. The annual Holiday Bazaar is a tradition at Luther Manor during which residents and Adult Day Services participants sell handmade crafts as a fundraiser for various projects to enhance the community. “In addition, Inga has been a faithful participant in the Resource Development Thank A Thon annual event calling donors to thank them for their personal financial gifts,” Schmitz said. “Most of all, Inga was an exemplary role model and supportive partner with Luther Manor staff as a devoted caregiver for her husband Warren. That is a priceless gift.” In Warren’s memory, Inga has donated two outdoor benches for the garden. His memorial service was held in the Lippold Faith and Education Center and all of the memorial gifts were earmarked for the Luther Manor Foundation. The commitment to family is what inspired Harwick’s daughter, Viki Olsen, to become a keyperson at her church, Kingo Lutheran, where she coordinates the Friends of Luther Manor membership drive and cookie collection. “I believe in Luther Manor,” Viki said. “I am just really impressed with the genuine caring that the staff has, the different levels of care, and it really impresses me the respect and dignity that the staff has for all of the residents – the way they celebrate being a senior citizen and your accomplishments.” The Harwick family has a special connection to Luther Manor; Inga’s three great-grandchildren were baptized by Director of Pastoral Care Dave Patterson during the Sunday morning church service. This sort of connection is what makes the community so special, according to Kanavas. “These are stories we love to hear because it is our mission in action,” she said. “Luther Manor is more than a place – it is a community. We all have a role to play; we all have something we can contribute – some piece in the Luther Manor puzzle.” g Inga Harwick and daughter, Viki Olsen What piece are you? Call Luther Manor at (414) 464-3880 and ask for Resource Development or Volunteer Services to learn about ways you can help Luther Manor complete the puzzle and fulfill its mission.
  • 6. ””” ”” ” ““““ “ “- 6 - supporters Luther Manor Heritage Partners honored Planned giving makes a lasting impact June is recognized as “Planned Giving Month” at Luther Manor. A luncheon was held on Wednesday, June 24 to thank the members of the Heritage Partner Society—those who have included Luther Manor in their estate planning. Heritage Partner Society members are a group of special individuals who envision a secure future for the older adults in the Luther Manor community. With planned giving, donors are able to create a lasting legacy to Luther Manor that will continue to serve well beyond their lifetimes. “Heritage Partner Society members are an integral part of the support and growth of the Luther Manor Foundation. We are very blessed by these individuals,” said Mary Kanavas, Resource Development Officer. About 30 Heritage Partner members attended the lunch. Honored guests included President and CEO Stephanie Chedid and Foundation Board Chair Tom Buck. Buck and Chedid thanked the attendees and reiterated how very important their gift and commitment to Luther Manor is. Chedid went on to discuss all the different ways individuals can support Luther Manor through their time, financial donations and the very important planned gift. Attendees provided valuable feedback as to how Luther Manor can better reach out to people and make them aware of the incredible value of planned giving and how crucial it is for Luther Manor to receive this support. “With all the ways to give to Luther Manor — volunteering, participating in fundraisers, memorial gifts and appeal gifts — including Luther Manor in our estate plan was an easy decision,” said Nancy Becher, Heritage Partner member and volunteer. “Luther Manor is so important in our lives and we like to participate in all aspects of giving back to this wonderful organization.” If you are interested in joining the Heritage Partner Society, please contact Mary Kanavas, Resource Development Officer at (414) 464-3880, ext. 462 or mkanavas@luthermanor.org. g Thank You for Giving to the Lord Notes from Pastor Dave Patterson Luther Manor has been, and continues to be, blessed with faithful stewards who unselfishly give their time, talents and treasures to support our mission of “Sharing God’s love through excellent housing, care and services.” Throughout this publication you will find biblical principles that offer guidance as to how we should give unto the Lord. Here are a few to start. Give Obediently Honor the Lord with your substance. - Proverbs 3:9 Give Gratefully What can I offer the LORD for all he has done for me? - Psalms 116:12 Give Cheerfully God loves a cheerful giver. - II Corinthians 9:7 Give Proportionately Each of you must bring a gift in proportion to the way the LORD has blessed you. - Deuteronomy 16:17 Give Sacrificially The righteous gives and spares not. - Proverbs 21:26 Give Wisely One gives freely, yet grows all the richer; another withholds, and only suffers want. - Proverbs 11:24
  • 7. Savethedate: Sixth Annual Love Lights Thursday,Dec.10,2015 - 7 -- 7 - supporters Luther Manor Dear Friends of Luther Manor members, Our 2015 funding projects have been a great success. They include six benches located around the campus, continued maintenance of the Terrace aquarium, two Hoyer lifts in the Courtyards to aid in resident transfers, and the beautiful Love Lights tree that we can’t wait to see this coming Advent Season. We are also in the process of purchasing new campus signage to help visitors find their way. I am excited to welcome three new keypersons: Bob and Joan Coffey at Gloria Dei, and Viki Olsen at Kingo. A little trivia for you: Joan was a Friends of Luther Manor past President from 1978-1980 and it’s great to have her back. Keypeople are an important link between the Friends of Luther Manor and our partner congregations. Contact me if you are interested in taking on this critical role. The Friends of Luther Manor 2015 annual meeting will be held on Sept. 24 in the Lippold Faith and Education Center, hosted by St. John’s Church of Brookfield. LoAnn Peterman and Kathy Campbell will be our hostesses. The third annual Jingle Mingle will take place Tuesday, Dec. 1 in the Terrace aquarium lobby. This is a wonderful, fun, event for Terrace residents to come and learn about the Friends of Luther Manor and how we support the entire Luther Manor campus. Last year’s event was a great success. We are always searching for a few good volunteers to serve as officers on the board. We are currently looking for a secretary and are excited to build up our fundraising committee. We have lots of fun as we work to support the needs of Luther Manor residents. Please contact Sandy Wals or Mary Kanavas if you would like more information. We are looking forward to 2016 and are excited to decide which campus projects we will support next year. We are very pleased that the Friends of Luther Manor has a positive impact and directly touches all areas of the community—this is so important to support the mission of Luther Manor. Love and Hugs, Sandy Wals, President of the Friends of Luther Manor and Luther Manor HCC Life Enrichment Specialist The Friends of Luther Manor is excited to host the sixth annual Love Lights Tree Lighting ceremony on Thursday, Dec. 10 at 4:30 p.m. in the Welcome Center. Love Lights is the major fundraiser for the Friends of Luther Manor. The sale of lights that decorate the Luther Manor Christmas tree support programs and services that benefit residents and participants throughout the Luther Manor community. Last year, the Friends of Luther Manor raised more than $10,000 from this event. Be a part of this special holiday tradition by purchasing an individual light or a strand of lights to honor or memorialize someone special. Individual lights are $5 and a strand of lights is $100. The twinkling lights are turned on during the special tree lighting ceremony. Kick off the Advent season with an evening filled with music, prayer, refreshments and celebration. For information about Love Lights, contact Resource Development Officer Mary Kanavas at (414) 464-3880, ext. 462. g Let our Love Lights shine bright Honor those who are dear to you with Love Lights
  • 8. - 8 - supporters Luther Manor 30 30% Celebrate give !years On Monday mornings, the basement of St. Mark’s Lutheran Church is humming with the sound of sewing machines as rainbow-hued squares of fabric are assembled into blankets. “It’s the Ford Assembly line of quilting,” said Pastor Andy Fetters. About a dozen dedicated quilters gather regularly to make blankets that the church distributes to a number of partner organizations in the community, and beyond. Last year, the church donated a staggering 400 quilts. “Some go out to the homeless in the community, others go halfway around the world for the Lutheran World Relief Quilt Mission and provide comfort to those who have lost everything in a natural disaster,” Fetters said. The mission of St. Mark’s is “Gathered together by God, to grow and go out” – and that is exactly what the members of this close-knit congregation do. “My goal is that we not have ‘consumer Christians’ – people who show up on Sunday, sit in church and go home unchanged,” said Fetters, who has served as pastor for three years. “When we gather, I want people to be changed, and motivated to share the good news in a variety of ways.” Located just on the outskirts of downtown Waukesha at 424 Hyde Park Ave., St. Mark’s Lutheran Church was established in 1948 by Pastor George Dressler. Before the church was built, worship services took place at the neighboring Blair Elementary School. Today the church is 900 strong – and growing. One of the church’s biggest success stories is its effort to fulfill its mission is its participation in Operation Inasmuch, the national nonprofit that equips churches Join in the celebration! Year-end appeal supports Foundation It has been 30 years since the creation of the Luther Manor Foundation back in 1985. Over the last three decades, the Foundation has enabled Luther Manor to fulfill Luther Manor’s mission of sharing God’s love by enriching the lives of older adults through excellent housing, care and services. Each donation made to the Luther Manor Foundation ensures that Luther Manor is able to care for the most vulnerable residents when they become financially unable to take care of themselves. It was the dream of the Foundation Board that Luther Manor not ever ask any resident to leave because of their inability to pay and 30 years later this time-honored tradition is still going strong. This fall, the year-end appeal will be a celebration of this wonderful tradition. We are asking you, our treasured donors, to increase your year-end gift by 30 percent in honor of this very special milestone. Now, more than ever, we need to continue to support the important work of the Luther Manor Foundation. As we face increasing health care costs and decreased government funding, many of our residents, through no fault of their own, need support and assistance. Please consider increasing your gift by 30 percent or making a special one-time gift in honor of the Foundation’s 30th anniversary. By celebrating and financially supporting the Luther Manor Foundation in its 30th year, we can lay the groundwork for a bright and secure future for our residents. Please continue to be a part of this wonderful mission and support the Luther Manor Foundation with an extra special gift this year. g Leaving a mark on the community God gathers St. Mark’s members to ‘grow and go out’
  • 9. - 9 -- 9 - supporters Luther Manor to move more congregants out of the sanctuary seats and into the streets to serve the neediest in their communities. “The first time we did it was last fall, and 150 people participated,” Fetters said. On Inasmuch Day, members could choose to participate in one of 25 different service opportunities in the community. “It really helps with the ‘go out’ part of the mission.” While St. Mark’s has many of the fellowship groups one might expect to find in a Lutheran church – Fetters prefers a unique approach to traditional topics. Two formation groups that Fetters is particularly proud of incorporate his own hobbies: brewing beer and motorcycle riding. “Roaring Lions is the motorcycle fellowship group. We chose the Lion because St. Mark has been attributed the character of the lion,” Fetters said. The second group is called “Faith Fermentation,” which marries the hobby of brewing beer and Bible study. “There is a lot of time in between fermentation,” Fetters said. “While we brew beer we dig into scripture.” St. Mark’s is also actively involved in the elder ministry, with members supporting Luther Manor as Friends of Luther Manor and volunteers. An important link between Luther Manor and St. Mark’s is the family of John and Betty Thompson, who served for 10 years as keypersons – taking over when John’s mother, Frances Thompson, stepped down. As keypersons, the Thompsons were responsible for organizing the Friends of Luther Manor membership drives and cookie cart collections at St. Mark’s. “May would be Luther Manor month,” Thompson said. St. Mark’s “We would collect cookies and recruit people to join the auxiliary (now known as the Friends of Luther Manor).” Now Larry and Vicki Nines undertake this responsibility. The church’s initial connection to Luther Manor was Pastor James Wilch, who led the congregation for 52 years. Pastor Wilch’s mother was a Luther Manor resident. But even after Wilch’s mother passed away and he retired, the church remained committed to its Luther Manor connection. “I really feel that one of the missions of the church is to support people as they age and to make sure older members are remembered and cared for,” Thompson said. To that end, Thompson and his wife visit members of St. Mark’s who are homebound. The Thompsons have been members of St. Mark’s since 1962. “As with any church, there is always more we could be doing,” Thompson said. “But we are proud of what the church does and Luther Manor is one of those good things.” Fetters, who served out east before moving to Wisconsin, had high praise for the members of his flock. “This is one of the most generous congregations I have ever been a part of. It shows in the use of their time, the gifts God has blessed them with, the resources that they share, and the heart that goes into it all,” Fetters said. “Their deep love of God is contagious and they don’t want to keep it to themselves. We are a very diverse congregation – politically and economically – we are really united in our baptism and that is exciting.” g
  • 10. - 10 - supporters Luther Manor On the second floor of the Luther Manor Health Care Center, just before the Truby Pavilion begins, there is a very special place. It is warm and welcoming to all who pass through its threshold. It is a place where families visiting loved ones on the final phase of life’s journey can gather to pray, recharge, or just be with one another. This special place is known as Luther Manor’s Sacred Space. The Sacred Space was created to support Luther Manor residents and their families during this difficult time with not only a physical location to gather, but also access to the information and expertise of the Luther Manor Hospice staff and volunteers. “Families who have had loved ones in our Hospice program have been so grateful to be able to use the Sacred Space, which was made possible through charitable gifts,” said Mary Kanavas, Resource Development Officer. “Charitable giving is such a critical part of Luther Manor’s ability to achieve its mission. Without it, taking on special projects that fall outside of the operating budget—like the Sacred Space—would be much more difficult.” Funding for the hospice-specific space came from two sources: a $40,000 grant from the Lutheran Service for the Elderly Endowment at the ELCA Foundation, awarded to Luther Manor in the fall of 2013; and a generous donation from Terrace resident Joyce Stibbe. So what drives a person to give? A Harvard Business School study showed that happier people give more and giving makes people Spring fund drive supports residents With May marking the 50th anniversary of the Older Americans Act of 1965, many of you responded to our “Get into the Act” appeal. Thanks to your generosity, the Luther Manor Foundation was able to raise $17,640. Our annual appeals are an important part of growing and sustaining the Luther Manor Foundation. It is through the strength of the Foundation that we are able to carry out our mission every day at Luther Manor. Thank you to all who responded with a generous gift. Now, more than ever, we need your continued support. We appreciate your generosity and commitment to Luther Manor. g Joyce Stibbe A place for families Donors fund hospice space Celebrating Older Americans Act! Get into the
  • 11. - 11 -- 11 - supporters Luther Manor ”“ The Sacred Space is flexible, functional, peaceful and lovely. ”“ Give to support the ministry Do not look out for your own personal interests, but also for the interests of others. - Philippians 2:4 happier, such that happiness and giving may operate in a positive feedback loop. Stibbe’s desire to improve the world around her and make it more beautiful is what led her to the Sacred Space giving opportunity. Stibbe, who made Luther Manor her home 13 years ago, is no stranger to charitable giving. Several years ago, she contacted Resource Development to discuss possible opportunities to memorialize her husband, Otto. “They came up with the idea of planting a tree,” Stibbe said. “I liked that very well.” Now, on the hillside, among the N, U, and T, buildings a 2-year- old Maple tree is growing in Otto’s honor. “We try to work with donors to find a way for them to give that is meaningful to them,” Kanavas said. “Giving to the Sacred Space was a way that felt meaningful to Joyce.” Originally from North Dakota, Stibbe’s father died when she was in high school. Her family consisted of her mother, a sister and a brother. Both of her siblings have now passed, and her nieces and nephews live out of state, so Stibbe is all that is left of her family in Wisconsin. Stibbe thought it would be nice for families to have a special place - like the Sacred Space - to go. Hospice Spiritual Care Coordinator Minister Marian Wasierski shared how families are utilizing the space. “Families have managed comfort foods with the refrigerator and microwave. Families have gathered around the large round table with their resident, each other, and staff for serious and fun times,” Wasierski said. “Families and residents have sat quietly in front of the fireplace, visiting, regrouping and relaxing. Staff has sat with residents, providing private social and spiritual care visits, with television on or off. The Sacred Space is flexible, functional, peaceful and lovely.” Luther Manor’s Medicare-certified Hospice Program has been operating for six years, giving patients and their loved ones the opportunity to make decisions about end of life care while being supported by a dedicated, compassionate staff. Stibbe could not be happier with how the Sacred Space has turned out. “I thought it looked beautiful,” she said. “I love the fireplace, the draperies —everything that is there. I love the whole thing.” Stibbe also offered her personal touch, donating a porcelain angel that sits inside the curio cabinet. “I like to beautify things,” she said. “Make things better for everybody.” What inspires you to give? Luther Manor Resource Development can help you find the charitable giving opportunity that best fits your unique personality. Call Mary Kanavas, Resource Development Officer at (414) 464- 3880 ext. 462. g
  • 12. Blessed with great gifts Hospice volunteer offers her presence - 12 - volunteers Luther Manor Thank you for lending a hand Volunteer I am by Eileen Thompson Twenty-four hours in every day. Where can I go to give some away? For my time is a gift. My experience gold, All I desire... Is a small hand to hold. A tear to wipe, a child to soothe A lonely patient to comfort when blue A harried worker to lend a hand to There's no need for you to strike up the band For I rarely seek out the fanfare of man. I simply have time to give quite away To help those in need and brighten their day For my time is my own. I give it for free. A volunteer I am. A volunteer I'll be. • • • To all of those Luther Manor volunteers who make it their business to lend a hand, thank you. To all of those looking to extend a hand to serve older adults at Luther Manor, please consider volunteering. We are currently seeking therapy escorts, coffee cart host/hostess, resale shop volunteers and ice cream parlor servers. Contact Volunteer Services to discuss the opportunity that might be right for you (414) 464-3880 ext. 600/577. g Cheryl Schmitz, Director of Volunteer Services Lori Schultz, Youth and Family Volunteer Specialist A loving touch, a listening ear, a patient and compassionate presence; these are some of the many gifts a hospice companion volunteer provides to those Luther Manor residents on their end of life journey. Mary Houseman of Milwaukee is one of these volunteers. Houseman, who retired as a school psychologist for the Waukesha and Milwaukee Public Schools but currently works part-time at the Highland Community School in Milwaukee, began her volunteer service at Luther Manor in August of 2014. She typically volunteers twice a week, for three to four hours each day. “I’ve always wanted to work with the elderly and in hospice,” she said. “Luther Manor was a good fit for me because I wished to be in a community where people really cared about each other; a place that had a sense of mission, purpose and commitment behind it.” The Luther Manor Hospice Program currently has about nine volunteers who provide companionship and support. “Hospice volunteers are invaluable,” said Rachel Coleman, Hospice Social Worker. “They play a vital role in our hospice system, providing socialization, stimulation, spiritual presence, comfort and peace.” Houseman often focuses her attention on the hospice patients who don’t have a lot of guests, but she visits with anyone who would appreciate her presence. “Every resident I have met is so different – unique and special,” Houseman said. “The vast majority of people I companion have been very appreciative, very gracious, very kind, very caring; just a real pleasure to be with. Even if they can’t verbally express themselves, its how they look at you or touch you.” Houseman, who practices mindfulness meditation, notes that hospice patients are living in the moment. “I am always working on my spirituality,” she said. “I consider what I do a ministry, but also a way of deepening my spirituality and my sense of the meaning and purpose of life. The people I see here – it is real. There is no pretense.”
  • 13. - 13 - volunteers Luther Manor Over the past year, Houseman has blessed Luther Manor with more than 220 hours of dedicated service. “One of Mary’s greatest gifts are her listening skills, whether it is listening to an individual’s life history, personal stories, memories or their concerns,” said Cheryl Schmitz, Director of Volunteer Services. “Luther Manor feels privileged to be able to match her experiences and skills to enhance the services we can offer in affirming the lives of residents who are entrusted to our care.” According to Coleman, Houseman meets the hospice patients where they are on their journey. “Mary understands that each visit may be different than the last, but is always willing to spend time and talk to people even if they aren’t able to reciprocate,” Coleman said. “Not only is she dependable, but she is open, honest, loving, and caring. She takes time with the patients and families. I’m lucky to have a volunteer like Mary.” When Mary is not volunteering at Luther Manor, she serves as a driver for Interfaith, taking older adults Mary Houseman who wouldn’t otherwise have access to transportation to doctor’s appointments, stores, food pantries and clinics. She also attends classes at the Osher Life Long Learning Institute and enjoys traveling. She most recently went on an Alaskan Cruise. She also has two English Springer Spaniels, Hattie, 13 and Francis, 9. “I love volunteering in hospice because of the contact with the residents,” Houseman said. “I serve them and they serve me. They are giving as much or more back to me as I give to them. I feel it is my privilege to bear witness to their journey and be with them on this journey.” For information about volunteer opportunities, contact Luther Manor Volunteer Services at (414) 464- 3880 ext. 600/577. g Resident Arlayne Grottveit and volunteer Mary Houseman.
  • 14. - 14 - volunteers Luther Manor We are the work of Your handsWe are the work of Your hands Shaped to VolunteerShaped to Volunteer A group of people made up of Terrace residents and community members received special recognition in April during the annual Volunteer Banquet. The theme of this year’s event was “Shaped to Volunteer, We are the Work of Your Hands.” “Volunteers are uniquely crafted, molded and shaped for a greater purpose,” said Director of Volunteer Services Cheryl Schmitz. “They generously give of their time and talents to engage residents and participants and enhance services at Luther Manor, Lakefield and River Oak communities.” Almost 500 volunteers give of their time and talent to Luther Manor annually. Those approaching special volunteer service milestones were honored at the banquet. Luther Manor President and CEO Stephanie Chedid presented pins to the honorees who were recognized for achieving volunteer milestones starting at 500 and exceeding 30,000 hours of service. Terrace resident Nancy Matton reached a service milestone of 25,000 hours and there were three new volunteers who joined the 10,000 hour club, community volunteers Nancy Becher and Miloudi Elafess, and Terrace resident Orville Treptow. Other honorees included Donald Koehler, Barbara Mohr and Alice Wagner who were recognized for reaching milestones of 5,000 service hours. Alva Heup received special recognition for celebrating not only her 500-hour volunteer milestone, but also her 100th birthday this year. In addition to celebrating service milestones, every year, staff members nominate volunteers who have gone above and beyond the call of duty for a special honor: the Good Samaritan Award. This year’s recipients were Tammy Kuepper, who volunteers in the Transitional Care Rehabilitation Center and Health Care Center, and Kay Fitch, who serves in the Courtyards. Volunteer banquet special guests included United Lutheran Program for the Aging Board officers, Chair Dale Kirchner, Assistant Secretary Stephen Knowles, and Treasurer Larry Nines. For more information about volunteer opportunities at Luther Manor, contact Volunteer Services at (414) 464-3880 ext. 600/577 or email volunteer@luthermanor.org. g Nancy Becher and Miloudi Elafess, pictured with President/CEO Stephanie Chedid reached the 10,000 hour milestone. 2015 Good Samaritan Awardrecipients Barb Mohr, with Chedid, was honored for 5,000+ service hours.
  • 15. - 15 - volunteers Luther Manor hand a helping Student Volunteers Lend One year ago, Luther Manor Volunteer Services thought hard about what student volunteers do in our senior community over the summer months. This is what we decided: in most cases, student volunteers serve with their hands at Luther Manor. They escort older adults in wheelchairs, serve coffee, scoop ice cream, roll tickets, move walkers at the Milwaukee Brewers game, score Wii games, cut and create cards, do manicures, provide computer and clerical assistance, dig in gardens, mix and bake and help with recipes, sew crafts, play cards and games, and probably much more! “ ” I learnedthat the elderly have great stories and are full of so much knowledge. – Bella Vang Since the beginning of 2015, 61 new student volunteers have walked through Luther Manor’s doors and blessed our older adults with time and talent. That’s in addition to the 90-plus returning student volunteers, 12-years-old to college-age. Our student volunteers come from Milwaukee, Waukesha, Ozaukee, Walworth and Washington counties. “ ” I gainedlots of wisdom from the residents and learned to communicate much better. – Johnna Odom Student volunteers represent many different schools, including Milwaukee Lutheran, Divine Savior Holy Angels, Milwaukee School of Languages, Rufus King, Wauwatosa High Schools and many more. They bring gifts of rich cultural heritage and tradition, music, and always respect for older adults. It has been a busy, bustling summer with the addition of dozens of young people to our building. Some of the students we will continue to see, as time allows, during their academic year. We have been blessed, and they have been a blessing. Thanks, Luther Manor student volunteers, for lending a hand this summer! A round of applause for our volunteers Simone Tatum was a recipient of a $5,000 college scholarship from National Heritage Academy. Johnna Odom was accepted to the school of pharmacy at Hampton University in Virginia. Zaynab Hassan was the recipient of a four-year Burke Scholarship for Marquette University. Lois Port was recognized for 25 years and 13,000 hours of volunteer service at Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital. Barbara Jordan took first place for her quilt at the Waukesha County Fair and State Fair. Jeannette Ingabire, Ana Mercado, and Breanna Rady received four-year Caroline Scholarships at Mt. Mary University. g
  • 16. - 16 - volunteers Luther Manor There is always something you can do. ”“ Some say age is nothing but a number – but in the case of Terrace resident and Luther Manor volunteer Alva Heup it is a great source of pride. When asked about her age, Heup proudly declares, “I am 100 years old.” And she has the swag to prove it. Heup can often be seen wearing a favorite T-shirt, which reads, “Born in the USA…A Long, Long, Time Ago.” But with her infectious laugh, indomitable spirit, and the big smile she wears for all she meets, the T-shirt is hardly her most memorable accessory. While achieving centenarian status is impressive, it is only one of Heup’s accomplishments this year. She recently reached a Luther Manor volunteer milestone of 500 service hours. “She is definitely a role model for all of us,” said Cheryl Schmitz, Director of Volunteer Services. “It was a privilege to honor her at the Volunteer Banquet in April for her milestone accomplishment of volunteer service at the amazing age of 100.” Heup jokingly attributes her healthy longevity to her “stubborn Norwegian” background. Never the wallflower, Heup said volunteering is just another way for her to be social. “I like people,” she said. Born on a farm in Dodgeville on Feb. 20, 1915, Heup’s life wasn’t an easy one. Heup’s mother died when she was very young, after the birth of her sister. The girls were sent to live with their grandmother, who was already caring for 10 children. Heup attended a one-room schoolhouse in Highland. Heup learned how to take care of a household, and chores like cleaning and washing. Her first job was working for a preacher’s family in Dodgeville. When the preacher was called Alva Heup No signs of slowing down Volunteer hits impressive milestones
  • 17. - 17 - volunteers Luther Manor to another church, she came with him and his family to Sturgeon Bay, where she lived for a year. When she was 22 years old, Heup moved to Milwaukee. Her days were spent working at Oster Manufacturing and her nights dancing away at the Eagles Ballroom. That was where she met Frank Heup. Alva and Frank were married on Jan. 18, 1938. They had a daughter named Carol and joined Covenant Lutheran Church. During her life, Heup has belonged to many different service groups, including the Covenant Ladies Society and the Milwaukee Lutheran High School Ladies Guild. She also volunteered at the Wellington Park Senior Center. Given her history of service, it is little surprise that Heup eventually became a volunteer at Luther Manor. “Alva began her volunteer service in March 2011 at age 96,” said Schmitz, “She is a delightful addition to the Den of Antiquity team and the Manor Mart! Her positive outlook on life and good sense of humor make her a welcome addition to Volunteer Services.” Heup also serves as a Terrace Welcome Representative, warmly greeting residents to their new Luther Manor home. Never afraid to try new things, in 2014, Heup took her turn on the runway for a Friends of Luther Manor Fashion Show that highlighted clothing items from the Den of Antiquity. Then 99, Heup wore a Badgley-Mishka dress and had photos snapped to send to her cousin in California. “He gets a kick out the things I do,” she said. “He likes to know what is going on at Luther Manor.” Heup hopes her story encourages people to join her in volunteering and not put limitations – age or otherwise – on what they can contribute to the world. “There is always something you can do,” she said. g NEEDS Volunteers Luther Manor Coffee Cart Hostess/Host Choice of week days 9:30 - 11 a.m. Deliver coffee and cookies while enjoying conversation with residents in Luther Manor’s Health Care Center. Ice Cream Parlor Clerk Choice of week days 1:45 - 4:15 p.m. Serve treats in a retro-themed Ice Cream Parlor to older adults, their families and guests. Den of Antiquity Shop Clerk Choice of Tuesdays/Thursdays Flexible shifts between 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Volunteer in a resale environment to raise funds for the Luther Manor Foundation. Luther Manor/HealthReach Therapy Transporter Choice of week days 8:45 a.m. - noon or 12:30 - 3 p.m. Provide wheelchair transport to/from campus therapy appointments. This is a great source of exercise! Have fun serving as... Please consider giving your gift of time to those who truly need it. Contact Volunteer Services at (414) 464-3880 ext. 600/577 or volunteer@luthermanor.org. g
  • 18. Memorial Gifts - 18 - There are many more opportunities to give beyond what is listed above. Please contact Mary Kanavas, Resource Development Officer, at (414) 464-3880, ext. 462, to find out more about any of the current funding needs, or to discuss how you might contribute to another worthwhile cause. Thank you for your prayerful consideration. Opportunities to giveOpportunities to give Elevated Garden Beds For the Terrace & Lakefield Adult Day Services There are many benefits of raised- bed gardening. Elevated beds enable residents to grow small plots of flowers and vegetables. They are space conscious, visually attractive and reduce back strain because they are elevated. $300 each Recumbent Exercise Bikes For the Terrace Fitness Center The old exercise bikes in the Fitness Center are difficult to use and outdated. Recumbent exercise bikes are a safer and easier alternative. $800 each Portable CD/Karaoke Machine For Wauwatosa Adult Day Services Musical activities are a fun way for Adult Day Services participants to express themselves, be creative and interact. Portable CD/Radio Player $50 Karaoke Machine $200 Light Grow Shelves For Wauwatosa Adult Day Services Light grow shelves will enable Adult Day Services participants to plant and grow herbs and spices to harvest. $450 iPad For Lakefield Adult Day Services Portable technology enhances one- on-one engagement, particularly with dementia participants. $500 MTS SureSeal Manual Sealer For the pharmacy This machine is used to package all medications into unit dose form for delivery to patients. $1,100 Safety Beds For the Transitional Care Rehabilitation Center Safety for the patient and staff is addressed with the updated features found on these wider beds. (4) $2,450 per bed Continuous Passive Motion Machine (CPM) For the Transitional Care Rehabilitation Center This machine is used after knee replacement surgery. It consistently and gently flexes and extends the knee joint in a slowed controlled movement. $2,150 Sequential Compression Device (SCD) For the Transitional Care Rehabilitation Center This machine is designed to decrease the development of blood clots and peripheral edema for those whose mobility is limited while recuperating from surgery or injury. $950 per machine Screens For the Park Terrace Dining Room (2) $1,200 each HD Projector For the Park Terrace Dining Room (2) $3,000 per machine 47” Flat Screen TV For Lakefield Adult Day Services A flat screen TV would replace a cumbersome and outdated box television. It would be easy to move and compatible with other modern devices like DVD players. $500 Broda Chair For the Health Care Center A Broda chair is used in place of a wheelchair. It has comfort tension seating which helps prevent pressure and creates long term comfort. The chair offers infinitely adjustable tilt and recline adjustments. $2,000-$3,400 60” Flat Screen TV For the Terrace & Health Care Center Old box televisions are in need of update in two popular resident gathering areas, Grandpa’s Parlor in the HCC, and the Exercise Center in the Terrace. $1,500 each Lift Chair For the Health Care Center, Transitional Care Rehabilitation Center, and the Courtyards Lift chairs feature a powered lifting mechanism that pushes the entire chair up from its base and assists a person to move to a standing position. $1,000 each Chair Scale For the Health Care Center These chair scales enable a resident to sit and have their weight taken. $900
  • 19. - 19 - Memorial Gifts Many individuals choose to memorialize their loved ones by making contributions to the Luther Manor Foundation. We recognize and celebrate those in whose memory gifts to Luther Manor have been given. Those who have been memorialized are listed below in bold-faced type and are followed by the names of the donor(s). The following memorial gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2015 through July 31, 2015. If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact the Resource Development Office at (414) 464-3880, email give@luthermanor.org, or use the gift envelope included in this issue of The Messenger. Virginia Ahrens B. H. Lohr Grace Alpert Barbara Alpert Ken Andeen Martha Andeen Our Parents & Sister Bill & Nancy Bagemihl Bud & Diana Baker Dr. & Mrs. Stephen Baker Maria Mariann Bauer Chris M. Bauer Sarah Bauer Joan R. Boland Pamela Jo Brown Mr. & Mrs. David F. Dostal Mr. & Mrs. John R. Evans Mr. & Mrs. Ralph M. Hasler Charlie, Teresa & Hannah Jackson Mr. & Mrs. Roger H. Johnson Patricia M. Kemp Walter Koeniger William O. McCormack Lois Nordholm Gerry & Pat Ostermick Diane F. Pellegrin Lindy M. Pritzl Mr. & Mrs. John Sirovina Brent Taylor Jacob & Carole Taylor Mr. & Mrs. Michael W. Weber Richard Benz Mary Ann Abrahamson Mr. & Mrs. Bert Hartinger Joan G. Heyne Richard Bertram Nancy Becher & Miloudi Elafess Kevin Birk Nancy Becher & Miloudi Elafess Robert Budnik Mrs. Michael Kelingos Mr. & Mrs. Herbert F. Scogg Mr. & Mrs. Robert Trotter Alice Brunelli Sally Gallatin Dolores Korbel Gloria Schmeling Cheryl Schmitz Lori J. Schultz Patricia H. Warth Son, Jim & Husband, Harry Jan Bruskewitz Irma Bruss Naomi R. Knoll Eugene F. Bussian Alice Knickelbine Rev. David Patterson Russ Chambers Gerry & Judy Beuk & T2 Ruth Cloninger Anonymous Mary Coogan Frank Coogan Ed & Dena Custer Marie Custer Michael E. Dillett Dillett Mechanical Service, Inc. Marcella Dixon Claire Moe Alda Dowdle Rick Dowdle Joyce Egerer John & Kathy Barkow Lucille Eggert Donald Eggert Shirley’s Mother, Virginia Einem Richard & Shirley Behrendt Alternating Pressure/Low Air Therapy Mattresses For the Transitional Care Rehabilitation Center These mattresses are used for residents with skin issues or potential for skin issues related to pressure. $3,000-$4,000. American Flag and Stand For Pastoral Care The flag of the United States is displayed during worship services on national holidays and special events as a way of giving thanks to God for the blessings of living in America. $500 HD camera For the Lippold Faith and Education Center A second camera would enhance the broadcasts of worship services and other programs that are watched by residents in the comfort of their rooms for whom it is difficult to get out. $2,000 ” ” “ “Give Humbly But when you give, do not announce it with trumpets, to be honored by others. - Matthew 6:2 Give to support the needy Contribute to the needs of the saints. - Romans 12:13
  • 20. Memorial Gifts - 20 - Wilma Georg Carol Dilthey C. “Mac” Geyer Lynne Cole Agnes Gilberts Dick & Kathy Adix Martha Andeen Eleanor Ciurro Mr. & Mrs. Mark F. Conrad Cross of Life Lutheran Church Mr. & Mrs. Harold A. Daus Marjorie Davis Virginia Dietzler Barbara Eberly Mr. & Mrs. Douglas A. Ehrick Mr. & Mrs. Mike Geraets Alice Gruell Don & Jolene Hansen Warren & Inga Harwick Bernice M. Heimerl Marcella R. Heimerl Joan G. Heyne Mr. & Mrs. James Irwin Margy S. Jernberg Joan E. Johnson Rae J. Kara John & Doris Keller Mr. & Mrs. Leslie L. Kingsbury Dolores Korbel Kristi Kothrade Carole E. LaFond Gloria Larson Ele Lindgren Dick & Betty Mattson Mr. & Mrs. Mark F. Nelson Jean H. Novotny Al & Edna Peterson Kathy Rovenko Mr. & Mrs. Dick Sonstegard Joyce M. Stibbe Marian Q. Thielke Jim Thunes Mary P. Watts Beth E. Wickert Mr. & Mrs. Brian J. Wickert Mr. & Mrs. David V. Wickert Mr. & Mrs. Frank C. Wickert Marilyn E. Zimmermann Ernie Gilberts Cross of Life Lutheran Church Harold Guenther Lorraine Guenther Edna Gula Kathleen Conrad Peter Gula Kathleen Conrad Lydia Gutekunst William C. Gutekunst Muggy Hanson Nancy Becher & Miloudi Elafess Warren J. Harwick Mary Ann Abrahamson Martha Andeen Dorothy Bauer Larry Eleanor Beckman Mr. & Mrs. John F. Behm Janet Beltman Mr. & Mrs. Dudley Blank Shirley Burmeister Ciske/Schlichtholz Family Eleanor Ciurro Dr. & Mrs. Denis Cortese Cathy & Edward David & Family Marjorie Davis Rev. Ronald G. Froehich Lois Goerlinger Joan G. Heyne Mr. & Mrs. Carl P. Hoppe Mr. & Mrs. Erik Huth Mr. & Mrs. J. Paul Jacobson Marjorie Jothen Rea Katz & Richard Bartlein John & Doris Keller Alice Knickelbine Joanne Krause Gloria Larson Dick & Betty Mattson Richard & Karen Merklein Janet Neu Jean H. Novotny Jean M. Rosier Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Ross Mr. & Mrs. Tom Simpson Marian Q. Thielke Jim Thunes Thomas Vanderbilt Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Walker My Parents Paul M. Heck Mariane Heidel Katherine M. Jastromski Edward & Edna Heimerl Bernice M. Heimerl Marcella R. Heimerl Myrtle Held John & Chris Kosma Hajja Mahjouba Elafess Lori J. Schultz Harold E. & Margaret F. Fahning Donald R. & Sandra L. Fahning Virginia Fauber James & Sharon Bertrand Mr. & Mrs. Perry Brewer Charles & Marianne Daliege Ronald Daliege Dennis & Patricia Daniels Marie Dupuis & Peter Westergard Linda Edmondson Alan Johnson Margaret Jonas Mr. & Mrs. John Plusch Thomas Floryance Sharon Floryance Vernon Foshager Martha Andeen Kathleen M. Budahl Mr. & Mrs. Stuart C. Gale Katherine M. Jastromski Al & Edna Peterson Dr. & Mrs. Frederick A. Pflughoeft Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Dr. & Mrs. George E. Rooney Grace Teslik Jim Thunes Viola Frank James Frank Lois Freitag Martha Andeen Larry & Eleanor Beckman Janet Beltman Gerald R. Brauns Inga Harwick Arline G. Henkel Bernice Herman Mr. & Mrs. Michael Miller Mr. Mrs. Carl Posbrig Jean Price Bob & Ann Rantanen Cheryl Schmitz June Skokon Bonnie Vick The Wagner Companies Mr. & Mrs. John Zima Melvin & Bodil Frick Sandra L. Menzel Viola Gamradt Mr. & Mrs. Frank Wallner
  • 21. - 21 - Memorial Gifts Lillian Leverenz Elmer E. Schultz Deceased Friends from Luther Manor Maury & Gloria Weinhold Sonja Maas Mr. & Mrs. Mark F. Conrad Duane Maas Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Monty Mr. & Mrs. Grant Wiedenhoeft Floyd J. Mann Arlene G. Mann Esther G. May Howard & Beverly Reoch Clarice McConnell Tom McConnell Lucille Moll Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Sr. Rose J. Kroeger Cheryl Schmitz Jeremy Monnett Nancy Becher & Miloudi Elafess G. H. Mortag B. R. Mortag Gladys Mortag Judith Oehler Kenneth Mueller Anonymous Lucille Mueller Mary Beth Bunnow Mr. & Mrs. Rino Clissa Janet E. Engel Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Engel Mr. Mrs. Eugene J. Flory Elaine L. Hall Roger C. Harry Betty J. Hjerstedt Constance Y. Kling Mr. Mrs. Joseph A. Potzner Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Ripley Andy & Janet Slater Harriet Nehmer Violet Baumgart Dorothy O’Brien Daniel F. Ring Marilynn Ring Kathleen O’Callaghan Marilyn Bub Alois & Meta Otzelberger Robert A. Otzelberger Brothers, Carl, George, Herbert & Gregory Robert A. Otzelberger Marion L. Paape Caryl J. Paape Eileen Pfeffer Rosemary Bell Mr. & Mrs. Fred C. Callies Wally & Diane Hogan Susan & David Keller Sue Lawrence John & Jean Miller Birdell Orlebeke Mary B. Parker Rev. David Patterson Mary Pfeffer Paul Pfeffer Roberta, Steven & Zachary Pratt Joyce M. Stibbe Tom & Sharon Tradewell Orville Treptow Steven Picciolo Janet Beltman Gloria Larson Ruth Militzer Bob & Audrey Richter Rudolph Porchetta Nancy Becher & Miloudi Elafess Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Rev. David Patterson Ada Quintenz Mr. & Mrs. Donald Quintenz Grethe Rawling Kenneth J. Rawling Alice L. Richter Anonymous Carl & Kay Richter Ruth Rudolph Mr. & Mrs. Lucas Brunmeier Mr. & Mrs. Michael Chang Lyle E. Drier Jean L. Elzinga Mr. & Mrs. Mark Goldner Kathleen A. Grimm Randy & Barbara Guyer Ruth Hartwig Mr. & Mrs. Craig O. Henes Marjorie Jothen Shirley Koenitzer Verna Held Marie E. Weiss Henrietta Heumann Mr. & Mrs. Thomas C. Heumann Ruth Heup Larry Heup Elsie Holmgren Joan G. Heyne Marjorie Jothen Dick & Betty Mattson Averle Hubbard Susan Hubbard Henry & Viola Jensen Steve & Debbie Jensen Genevieve Johnson Ginni Verthein Lydia C. Judd Judy M. Judd Belle & Oscar Jung Joyce Heinrich Darlyn Katt L. Lee Katt Jean Klaas David J. Beinlich Kate Bertram Bette Diehl Luanne M. Schmidt Katie Tillmar Erika J. Tole Elmer “Nick” Knickelbine Kay E. Fenico Leslie H. Krause Germaine Krause Raymond J. Krueger & Bonnie Krueger Kent K. Krueger Kenneth Kruger Lucille L. Farwig Margaret Laun Daniel F. Ring Doris Lauterbach Mary Ann Abrahamson Janet Beltman Linda Glubka Inga Harwick Joyce Heinrich Mr. & Mrs. Erik Huth Contance Y. Kling Shirley Koenitzer
  • 22. Memorial Gifts - 22 - Mr. & Mrs. Leon A. Krueger Becky S. Kunkler Elaine Lindstrom Mr. & Mrs. Anthony McGinitty Merit Title LLC Mr. & Mrs. Carl Penner Cheryl Schmitz Mr. & Mrs. John Schwendel Dolores M. Stowasser Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Streng Mr. & Mrs. Eappen Thomas Orville Treptow Mr. & Mrs. William Van Valzah Mr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Welch Karen H. Westfahl Enid F. Wolf Mr. & Mrs. Walter A. Zube Virginia Ruplinger Mary E. Vettel Russ & Marion Rutter Russ & Margaret Rutter Doris Schier Kathleen S. Schier Sheila Zenner Emily Schillinger Jean Morack Earl H. Schlief Janet Beltman Bruce E. Schneider Mr. & Mrs. Conrad Heinzel Birdice J. Schultz Teri L. Fleming Mary Schumann Cheryl Schmitz Astrid Schumell Rev. John H. Schumell Harriet Shumway Alfred E. Shumway Gwenn Simonson Linda Kautz Bonnie Lyons William Simpson Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Our Parents & Step-Mom Ron & Kathy Sonntag Helen Sorensen Mark R. Sorensen Hope Steldt Bonnie Vick Hazel S. Stoller Mr. & Mrs. Gordon Fritsche Louise Stoner A. Christine Adams Mr. & Mrs. William Arnold Carn M. Bade Jean E. Bauhs Barbara Cardo Barb Donohue Gerald T. Frank Mr. & Mrs. Ronald M. Groeschl Nancy & Mike Hansen Mr. & Mrs. Marty Larsen, Jr. Karen M. LeSage John Miota Jean M. Rosier Dolores A. Schiefelbein Mr. & Mrs. Keith A. Schmidt Mr. & Mrs. Charles F. Schultz Jeanette A. Schultz Mr. & Mrs. Donald Sneider Sue Starker & Judy Filut Joseph A. Stiletti Betty J. Wicht Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Zunk Connie Sweet Roberta, Steven & Zachary Pratt Ruth Swessel Cathy Swessel Maryanne Szyjakowski Beverly Hess Cheryl Schmitz Wanda Tischner Jill Lindberg Hazel Trede Ralph Trede Davies & Van Eerden Parents Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Van Eerden, Sr. Norma Warmie Martha Andeen Mr. & Mrs. Donald W. Anderson Bill & Nancy Bagemihl Sherry L. Boyd Mr. & Mrs. Rolf Ekstrand Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Ellingson Margie Floyd Sharon J. Halpin Joan G. Heyne Connie Johnson Marjorie Jothen Dolores Korbel Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Kramer Noryanne Lahl Nancy Matton Kevin Meissner Jean M. Moberg Jean H. Novotny Mr. & Mrs. Mike Othrow Rev. & Mrs. David Patterson Patricia A. Reynolds Gloria Schmeling Lori J. Schultz Marian Q. Thielke Carol Wichmann Ardvie Wegner Lucille L. Farwig Betty Weisel Pam Weisel Roy Weltzien Aretas O. Bayley Debra Dixon Bonnie Fredrick Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Graetz LeeAnn Himebauch Lou Ann Madson Mr. & Mrs. Michael R. Niver Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Reich Gertrude E. Scholz Mr. & Mrs. Norman L. Schultz Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd Steinkamp Mr. & Mrs. Walter K. Unglaub Don L. Weltzien Ruth Zirwes Betty A. Trampe Kenneth Zweifel Roberta J. Pratt Mark & Cheryl Schmitz ”“Give to bring glory to God Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above - James 1:17
  • 23. - 23 - ribute GiftsTThe following individuals were honored by their families and friends. Tribute gifts serve to commemorate birthdays, wedding anniversaries or other special occasions or simply to show appreciation for a friendship or act of kindness. Those who have been honored through a gift to Luther Manor are listed below in bold-faced type and are followed by the names of the donor(s). The following tribute gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2015 through July 31, 2015. If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact the Resource Development Office at (414) 464-3880, email give@luthermanor.org, or use the gift envelope included in this issue of The Messenger. Adeline Amberg’s Birthday Gloria Schmeling Bert Ammentorp Rich Ammentorp Martha Andeen The Hughes Family Inga Harwick Warren R. Stumpe Alva Heup’s 100th Birthday Joanne Krause 17 Grandchildren & 17 Great- Grandchildren John & Doris Keller Alice Knickelbine Mr. & Mrs. Gordon A. Hatcher Marianne Koehler’s Birthday Carol Paulson Mary Ann Russom Cheryl Schmitz Chris & Lori Schultz Beverly Thompson Alan Turner My Family Sr. Rose Kroeger Sr. Rose Kroeger Robert & Ellen Bladorn Rev. Wm. H. & Nancy Truby Lillian Love Eric A. Love An act of kindness from Luther Manor staff person Robert A. Otzelberger Betty Mattson’s Birthday Sharon D. Odahl Rev. David Patterson Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Joyce Heinrich he Hope Society GiftsT The Hope Society is a program that offers friends and family a way to remember their loved one(s) with a gift to the Luther Manor Hospice program. Those who have been memorialized are listed below in bold-faced type and are followed by the names of the donor(s). The following Hope Society gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2015 through July 31, 2015. If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact the Resource Development Office at (414) 464-3880, or give@luthermanor.org. Joyce Egerer John & Kathy Barkow Joseph Heller Gary Bishop Mr. & Mrs. Donald Earnest Mr. & Mrs. Charles D. Kenas Mr. & Mrs. William H. Klink Mr. & Mrs. Roland D. Liske Diane Nissler Mr. & Mrs. Jay Paunovich Rudolph Porchetta Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Mr. & Mrs. T. Turner Roberta Pratt & Orville Treptow for rendered services in Manor Mart Dorothy & Gene Treptow Luanne Schmidt Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Cheryl Schmitz Ann Towell Adeline Amberg Marilyn Arndt Gloria Schmeling Rusty Tym Sharon Novak-Tym The Luther Manor Foundation was created in 1985 as a charitable nonprofit organization to provide financial support for Luther Manor’s ministry. The 2015/2016 Luther Manor Foundation Board of Directors include: Fred Anderson, Treasurer Thomas Buck, Chair Gwen Jackson William Pickering, Secretary Amy Sarles John Silseth, Immediate Past Chair The Messenger is published periodically by Luther Manor, a ministry of the United Lutheran Program for the Aging. Comments and suggestions regarding this publication are always welcome. Contact the Luther Manor Resource Development office at: 4545 N. 92nd Street Wauwatosa, WI 53225 (414) 464-3880 give@luthermanor.org www.luthermanor.org The content provided in The Messenger is intended only to be informational. The Luther Manor Foundation does not render legal, tax or other financial advisory services. For assistance with your specific situation, professional services should be sought.
  • 24. A ministry of the United Lutheran Program for the Aging 4545 N. 92nd Street • Wauwatosa, WI 53225 As a nonprofit, faith-based organization and one of the finest senior living communities in Southeastern Wisconsin, Luther Manor has been caring and advocating for seniors for more than 50 years. Our mission is to share God’s love by enriching the lives of older adults through excellent housing, care and services. In addition to retirement housing, assisted living and long-term care options, we offer rehabilitation services, adult day services, hospice care and community outreach programs. Guided by our Christian heritage and values, we consistently strive to exceed the expectations of those we serve. You can count on our commitment and reputation when selecting housing or health care services for yourself or someone you love. If you would like to make a contribution to help support any of the programs or services the Luther Manor community offers, please contact the Resource Development Office at (414) 464-3880, ext. 447 or give@luthermanor.org.