MODELING3   AND UML    OVERVIEW
1   INTRODUCTION    2 METHODOLOGIES    3 MODELS AND UML    4 OBJECT CONCEPTS    5   ANALYSIS2    6 SOFTWARE DESIGN
Goal of Presentation3       This presentation will         Define model and diagrams and explain importance of          ...
Definitions4        A model is a simplified representation of         something in the real world, usually for the purpos...
What Are Models For?5         Models are used for:            To capture and precisely state requirements and domain    ...
Levels of Models6         Models take on different forms and appear at          different levels of abstraction.         ...
Many Matching Models7        Each model emphasizes some aspect of the real-         world thing.        Thus, many model...
8
Diagrams9        Diagrams are abstract shapes that are used to         represent things or actions from the real world   ...
Author            Reviewer       Typesetter      Printer      An Example      of a Diagram                                ...
Hiding Detail                         Write Chapter                                                          Plan Chapter1...
Diagrams versus Models12         A diagram illustrates some aspect of a system.         A model provides a complete view...
Models in Systems Development13         To understand the user’s world we need:            People sensitivity (interview...
Developing Models14         The models that we produce during the development of          a system change as the project ...
Development of Use Case Model through successive iterations                                                               ...
Earlier Models and Diagrams16        A variety of modeling notations have developed         over the years. These include...
Process Models: Data Flow17     Diagrams        Focus not just on operations but on who does what with         whom. That...
Data Models: ERDs18        Focus on data modeling rather than on process         modeling.        Entity Relationship Di...
OO Diagramming19        There are all sorts of different OO diagrams:            e.g., Booch OOD, Rumbaugh OMT, Yourdon ...
UML Defined20          The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a general           purpose visual modeling language that i...
UML Defined21          It captures decisions and understanding about           systems that must be constructed.        ...
Not A Programming Language!22        The UML is not a programming language !        The UML is a general-purpose modelin...
Goals of UML23          There were a number of goals behind the development of UML:               UML is a general-purpo...
What Does Unified Mean?24          The word unified has the following relevant           meanings for UML:             A...
UML Building Blocks25         UML is composed of three building blocks:            Things                  These are th...
UML Things26         UML thing may be partitioned into:              Structural things                  Represent the n...
UML Relationships27        Used to show how two or more things         relate to each other.           generalization    ...
Diagrams in UML28         UML diagrams consist of:                                                          Write Chapter...
UML Diagrams29      Static Model                             Dynamic Model        class diagram                           ...
UML Parts30          A system is modeled as a collection of discrete           objects that interact to perform work that...
Static and Dynamic Information31          In particular UML captures information about the static structure and the dynam...
Organization32          The UML also contains organization constructs for           arranging models into packages that p...
UML Concepts33         system              The overall thing that is being modeled.         sub-system              Pa...
Static Structure34          Any precise model must first define the universe of           discourse.               That ...
Class static structure diagrams35                         BankAccount               Customer                     -customer...
Dynamic Behavior36          There are two ways to model behavior:             One   is the communication patterns of a s...
Use Cases37         When we analyze a system we try to identify the          main functionality that the system will have...
Using Use Cases38         A use case captures the main functionality of the          system from a user or actor’s perspe...
Use Case Diagram39        We can model use cases in a use case diagram.          Stickfigures represent actors.         ...
Activity Diagrams40        Used to model business activities/tasks in the very         early stages of a project.       ...
Activity Diagrams41     activities           Add a New                            Client            transitions           ...
Activity Diagrams42        Swimlanes                   Campaign                                     Manager              ...
Sequence Diagrams43         The class diagram is limited in that it does not          represent time-dependent behaviors....
Sequence Diagrams44     Patron                       Librarian                System              SubmitResources()       ...
Collaboration Diagram45        A collaboration diagram shows interactions         organized around the objects and their ...
Statechart Diagram46         The statechart diagram shows the states an object          might be in and the actions or co...
Statechart Diagram47                        Retrieving Books                      Packaging                               ...
Model Organization48          Computers can deal with large flat models, but           humans cannot.          In a larg...
Packages49        If the class diagram becomes large, it will become         quite difficult to use for an overview of th...
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OO Development 3 - Models And UML

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Course material from my Object-Oriented Development course. This presentation introduces models, diagrams, and the UML.

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  • This is a diagram of producing a book. It is highly simplified!
  • This is meant to be a magnifying glass! It is looking into the Write Chapter activity to show a lower level of detail. Switch of the animation if you don’t like it. You can make the point, made in the book, that these activities could be broken down further, but it may not be useful to do so. There are also activities, such as Stare out of Window, Make Coffee, Change CD (all of which I have just done) that are essential to the process of writing, but represent unnecessary detail. (You could make the point that there might be other purposes for which these would be relevant. For example, someone studying the creative process or a time and motion study of how productively authors use their time.)
  • OO Development 3 - Models And UML

    1. 1. MODELING3 AND UML OVERVIEW
    2. 2. 1 INTRODUCTION 2 METHODOLOGIES 3 MODELS AND UML 4 OBJECT CONCEPTS 5 ANALYSIS2 6 SOFTWARE DESIGN
    3. 3. Goal of Presentation3  This presentation will  Define model and diagrams and explain importance of them to system development.  Introduce UML
    4. 4. Definitions4  A model is a simplified representation of something in the real world, usually for the purpose of understanding that reality, and having all the features of that reality necessary for the current task or problem.  Like a map, a model represents something else.  Thus modeling is a form of abstraction, that is, the process of focusing only on features essential to the problem at hand. Source: David William Brown, An Intro to Object-Oriented Analysis (Wiley, 2002), p. 30
    5. 5. What Are Models For?5  Models are used for:  To capture and precisely state requirements and domain knowledge so that all stakeholders may understand and agree on them.  To think about the design of a system.  To capture design decisions in a mutable form separate from the requirements.  To generate usable work products.  To organize, retrieve and edit info about large systems.  To explore multiple solutions economically.  To master complex systems. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 13-4
    6. 6. Levels of Models6  Models take on different forms and appear at different levels of abstraction.  A useful model has the right level of detail and represents only what is important for the task in hand.  The amount of detail in the model is adapted to one of the following purposes:  Guides to the thought process.  Abstract specifications of the essential structure of a system.  Full specification of a final system.  Exemplars of typical or possible systems.  Complete or partial descriptions of systems. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 15-6
    7. 7. Many Matching Models7  Each model emphasizes some aspect of the real- world thing.  Thus, many models are required to reveal all the important details of that thing.  Yet, these matching models must eventually fit together.  What is represented in one model must be consistent with what is represented in another model. Source: Satzinger and Orvik, The Object-Oriented Approach (Course Technology, 2001), p. 51
    8. 8. 8
    9. 9. Diagrams9  Diagrams are abstract shapes that are used to represent things or actions from the real world  Diagrams follow rules or standards  The standards make sure that different people will interpret the diagram in the same way 40° Source: Bennett, McRobb, and Farmer, Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design (McGraw Hill, 2002), p. 98-9.
    10. 10. Author Reviewer Typesetter Printer An Example of a Diagram Write Chapter10 Review Chapter An activity Revise Chapter [book not diagram of the complete] [book complete] tasks involved in producing a book. Typeset Book Correct Proofs Reset Book Print Book Source: Bennett, McRobb, and Farmer, Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design presentation.
    11. 11. Hiding Detail Write Chapter Plan Chapter11 Author Reviewer Typesetter Printer Produce First Draft Write Chapter Revise Draft Review Chapter [not satisfied] [satisfied] Revise Chapter Add Exercises [book not complete] [book Add References complete] to Bibliography Typeset Book Correct Proofs Reset Book Print Book Source: Bennett, McRobb, and Farmer, Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design presentation.
    12. 12. Diagrams versus Models12  A diagram illustrates some aspect of a system.  A model provides a complete view of a system at a particular stage and from a particular perspective.  A model may consist of a single diagram, but most consist of many related diagrams and supporting data and documentation. Source: Bennett, McRobb, and Farmer, Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design (McGraw Hill, 2002), p. 100-1.
    13. 13. Models in Systems Development13  To understand the user’s world we need:  People sensitivity (interviewing and listening skills) for gathering relevant and accurate information.  Modeling diagrams to document and communicate what we’ve learned from the users.  We are using UML as our modeling notation.  Modeling techniques to ensure these notations produce an accurate picture of the user’s business.  These are partly defined by:  the modeling notation itself, as well as  the software process/methodology. Source: David William Brown, An Intro to Object-oriented (Wiley, 2002), p. 38
    14. 14. Developing Models14  The models that we produce during the development of a system change as the project progresses.  They change by degree of:  Abstraction  Model will become less abstract and more concrete.  Formality  Degree of formality in which methods, attributes, and constraints are defined will increase as project progress.  Level of detail  More potential detail in every model as project progresses. Source: Bennett, McRobb, and Farmer, Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design (McGraw Hill, 2002), p. 103-5.
    15. 15. Development of Use Case Model through successive iterations Staff Management Iteration 1 Add a new staff member Staff Management Add a new staff member Add a new staff grade Add a new staff grade Change the rate for a staff grade Obvious use cases. Ac countant Change the rate for a staff grade Change the grade for a staff member Ac countant Change the grade for a staff member Calculate staff bonuses Simple use case descriptions. Calculate staff bonuses Staff Management Add a new staff member Staff Management Iteration 2 Add a new staff member Staff Management Add a new staff grade Add a new staff Campaign Selection member Add a new staff grade Change the Campaign Selection rate for a staff grade Client: Holborn Motors Add a new staff Campaign Selection Lynch Properties grade Ac countant Change the rate for a Client: Holborn Motors Yellow Partridge Yellow Partridge staff grade Change the Lynch Properties Zeta Systems Additional use cases. grade for a Change the staff member Client: Holborn Motors Yellow Partridge Yellow Partridge Ac countant Spring Jewellery Campaign 1997 Campaign:Lynch Properties Zeta Systems rate for a staff grade Change the grade for a Spring Jewellery Campaign 2001 Yellow Partridge staff member Spring Jewellery Campaign 1997 Zeta Systems Jewellery Campaign 2002 Spring Ac countant Calculate staff Campaign: Change the bonuses Spring Jewellery Campaign 2001 Summer Collection 1998 grade for a Spring Jewellery Campaign 2002 Spring Jewellery Campaign staff member Campaign: Calculate staff Summer Collection 1998 2002 bonuses OK Quit Simple use case descriptions. Calculate staff bonuses OK Quit OK Quit Prototypes. Iteration 3 Campaign Management Assign staff to work on a campaign «include» Campaign Management Find campaign Assign staff «include» to work on a campaign Add a new «include» ert to adv Campaign Selection a campaign «include» Find campaign Campaign Management Assign staff to work on Campaign Manager Add a new «include» Campaign Selection a campaign «include» ert to adv a campaign Check campaign «include» Find campaign budget Client: Holborn Motors Campaign «include» Campaign Selection Lynch Properties Manager Add a new adv ert to «extend» «extend» Client: Holborn Motors Yellow Partridge Yellow Partridge Structured use cases. Check campaign a campaign «include» budget Lynch Properties Zeta Systems Campaign Manager Print campaign summary Print campaign invoice Client: Holborn Motors Yellow Partridge Yellow Partridge Spring Jewellery Campaign 1997 Campaign:Lynch Properties «extend» «extend» Check campaign budget Zeta Systems Spring Jewellery Campaign 2001 A ccountant Print campaign Print campaign Yellow Partridge summary invoice Spring Jewellery Campaign 1997 Zeta Systems Jewellery Campaign 2002 Spring «extend» «extend» Campaign: A ccountant Spring Jewellery Campaign 2001 Summer Collection 1998 Print campaign Print campaign Spring Jewellery Campaign 2002 Spring Jewellery Campaign summary invoice Campaign: Summer Collection 1998 2002 Structured use case descriptions. A ccountant OK Quit OK Quit OK Quit Prototypes.15 Source: Bennett, McRobb, and Farmer, Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design (McGraw Hill, 2002), p. 104.
    16. 16. Earlier Models and Diagrams16  A variety of modeling notations have developed over the years. These include:  Process models (data flow diagrams)  Data models (ERDs)
    17. 17. Process Models: Data Flow17 Diagrams  Focus not just on operations but on who does what with whom. That is, the focus is on data and how it processes through an organization.  Used Data Flow Diagrams (DFDs) as a way to model the activities, functions, and processes that make up a users’ business. Student Details Registration Validated Student Student Details Records Acknowledgement of Registration Student Enrollment Confirmation Confirmation of Enrollment Request Enrollment Enrollment Confirmed Vacancies Courses Enrollments Enrollments
    18. 18. Data Models: ERDs18  Focus on data modeling rather than on process modeling.  Entity Relationship Diagrams (ERDs) used as analysis tool as well as a database design tool.
    19. 19. OO Diagramming19  There are all sorts of different OO diagrams:  e.g., Booch OOD, Rumbaugh OMT, Yourdon & Coad, etc.  UML (Unified Modeling Language) has become the standard notation for OO diagramming and modeling.  The modeling notation defined by UML does not define a modeling technique  These are defined by the software process/methodology.  UML is not a methodology or process; rather it is a universal modeling notation.
    20. 20. UML Defined20  The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a general purpose visual modeling language that is used to specify, visualize, construct, and document the artifacts of a software system. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 3
    21. 21. UML Defined21  It captures decisions and understanding about systems that must be constructed.  It is used to understand, design, browse, configure, maintain, and control information about systems.  It is intended to be used with all development methods, lifecycle stages, application domains, and media. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 3
    22. 22. Not A Programming Language!22  The UML is not a programming language !  The UML is a general-purpose modeling notation for discrete systems such as software.
    23. 23. Goals of UML23  There were a number of goals behind the development of UML:  UML is a general-purpose modeling language that all modelers can use.  It is meant to include the concepts of the leading methods so that it can be used as their modeling language.  It was intended to be as familiar as possible.  It is meant to support good practices for design such as encapsulation, separation of concerns, and capture of the intent of a model construct.  It is intended to address current software development issues, such as large scale, distribution, concurrency, patterns and team development.  It was to be as simple as possible while still being capable of modeling the full range of practical systems that need to be built. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 8-9
    24. 24. What Does Unified Mean?24  The word unified has the following relevant meanings for UML:  Across historical methods and notations.  Across the development lifecycle  Across application domains  Across implementation languages and platforms  Across development processes  Across internal concepts Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 7-8
    25. 25. UML Building Blocks25  UML is composed of three building blocks:  Things  These are the modeling elements  Relationships  These tie things together  Diagrams  These are views into UML models Source: Booch, The Unified Modeling Language User Guide (Addison-Wesley, 1998), p. 2.
    26. 26. UML Things26  UML thing may be partitioned into:  Structural things  Represent the nouns of a UML model such as class, component, use case, etc  Behavioral things  Represent the verbs of a UML model such as interactions, states, etc.  Grouping things  Represent things that group elements together such as the package.  Annotational things  The note Source: Arlow and Neustadt, UML and the Unified Process (Addison-Wesley, 2002), p. 9.
    27. 27. UML Relationships27  Used to show how two or more things relate to each other. generalization association dependency realization Source: Arlow and Neustadt, UML and the Unified Process (Addison-Wesley, 2002), p. 10.
    28. 28. Diagrams in UML28  UML diagrams consist of: Write Chapter  icons Plan Chapter  two-dimensional symbols Produce First Draft  paths Revise Draft  Strings [not satisfied]  UML diagrams are views into the model. [satisfied]  They are not the model itself Add Exercises Add References to Bibliography Source: Bennett, McRobb, and Farmer, Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design presentation.
    29. 29. UML Diagrams29 Static Model Dynamic Model class diagram object diagram component diagram use case diagram deployment diagram sequence diagram collaboration diagram statechart diagram activity diagram Source: Arlow and Neustadt, UML and the Unified Process (Addison-Wesley, 2002), p. 11.
    30. 30. UML Parts30  A system is modeled as a collection of discrete objects that interact to perform work that ultimately benefits an outside user.  UML has:  static and,  dynamic parts. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 3
    31. 31. Static and Dynamic Information31  In particular UML captures information about the static structure and the dynamic behavior of a system.  The static structure defines the kinds of objects important to a system and to its implementation, as well as the relationships among the objects.  The dynamic behavior defines the history of objects over time and the communications among objects to accomplish goals. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 3
    32. 32. Organization32  The UML also contains organization constructs for arranging models into packages that permit software teams to:  partition large systems into workable pieces.  understand and control dependencies among the packages, and  manage the versioning of model units in a complex development environment.  The UML contains constructs for representing implementation decisions and for organizing run-time elements into components. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 3-4
    33. 33. UML Concepts33  system  The overall thing that is being modeled.  sub-system  Part of the system.  model  An abstraction of system or subsystem from a particular perspective or view.  Different models present different views of the system.  diagram  A graphic representation of a set of elements in the model. Source: Bennett, McRobb, and Farmer, Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design (McGraw Hill, 2002), p. 102.
    34. 34. Static Structure34  Any precise model must first define the universe of discourse.  That is, the key concepts from the application, their internal properties, and their relationships to each other.  This set of constructs is the static view of the system.  The static view is notated by class diagrams (also called class static structure diagrams).  That is, the application concepts are modeled as classes, each of which describes a set of discrete objects that hold information and communicate to implement behavior. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 9
    35. 35. Class static structure diagrams35 BankAccount Customer -customerName -accountNum -balance +getCustomerName() +getAccountNum() +getBalance() +setBalance() Loan CheckingAccount -interestRate -serviceCharge +makePayment() +deposit() +addInterest() +withdrawal()
    36. 36. Dynamic Behavior36  There are two ways to model behavior:  One is the communication patterns of a set of connected objects as they interact to implement behavior.  This is modeled using use case diagrams, sequence diagrams, collaboration diagrams, and activity diagrams.  The other is the evolution of an object’s state over time as it interacts with the rest of the world.  State change refers to possible changes in object’s attributes and associations with other objects.  This is modeled as a statechart. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 9-10
    37. 37. Use Cases37  When we analyze a system we try to identify the main functionality that the system will have and the main ways it will be used.  Each of these ways the system is going to be used is called a use case. A use case is a sequence of actions a system performs that yields an observable result of value to a particular actor.  An actor is either a person (user) interacting with the system or, in some cases, another system interacting with the system. Source: Satzinger and Orvik, The Object-Oriented Approach (Course Technology, 2001), p. 53
    38. 38. Using Use Cases38  A use case captures the main functionality of the system from a user or actor’s perspective.  It also serves as a vehicle to divide the system into parts that can be implemented somewhat separately.  For any given system, we will usually develop and implement the most important use cases first.  Establishing which use cases are important often follows from looking at the main events in the problem domain. Source: Satzinger and Orvik, The Object-Oriented Approach (Course Technology, 2001), p. 54
    39. 39. Use Case Diagram39  We can model use cases in a use case diagram.  Stickfigures represent actors.  Ovals represent the use case.  The arrows show interactions. Video Store System Rent Videos Video Store Clerk Add New Videos
    40. 40. Activity Diagrams40  Used to model business activities/tasks in the very early stages of a project.  Also used to describe a system function described by a use case.  They are analogous to standard flowcharts.
    41. 41. Activity Diagrams41 activities Add a New Client transitions Assign Staff Contact [new campaign] decisions [campaign to add] object flow Add New Campaign object :Campaign
    42. 42. Activity Diagrams42  Swimlanes Campaign Manager Accountant Client  vertical columns Record Completion  labelled with the of a campaign person, organisation Issue invoice or department responsible for the Pay invoice activities in that column Record client payment
    43. 43. Sequence Diagrams43  The class diagram is limited in that it does not represent time-dependent behaviors.  Sequence diagrams present object interactions arranged in time sequence.  Itshows the actors or objects participating in an interaction and the events they generate arranged in a time sequence.  Often, a sequence diagram shows the events that result from a particular instance of a use case but a sequence diagram can also exist in a more generic form. Source: Satzinger and Orvik, The Object-Oriented Approach (Course Technology, 2001), p. 62
    44. 44. Sequence Diagrams44 Patron Librarian System SubmitResources() Rectangles represent objects. Stick figures represent actors. Vertical lines represent the lifeline of the object or actor. SubmitLibraryCard() Horizontal arrows indicate messages. RecordID() CheckStatus() status() RecordCallNumber() CalcDueDate() RecordLoan() dueDate()
    45. 45. Collaboration Diagram45  A collaboration diagram shows interactions organized around the objects and their messages to each other.  Collaboration diagrams and sequence diagrams are used interchangeably.  Unlike a sequence diagram, a collaboration diagram shows relationships among object roles and it does not express time as a separate dimension. Message1() 2: Message2() 3: Message3() ClassAInstance ClassBInstance
    46. 46. Statechart Diagram46  The statechart diagram shows the states an object might be in and the actions or conditions that cause an object to make a transition from one state to another.  By documenting events and transitions, a statechart diagram shows the sequence of states an object goes through during its life.  Statecharts are extensions of the class diagram and you could create one statechart for each class.  In practice, you will only create a statechart for those classes that exhibit especially interesting or complex time- dependent behavior. Source: Satzinger and Orvik, The Object-Oriented Approach (Course Technology, 2001), p. 60
    47. 47. Statechart Diagram47 Retrieving Books Packaging setFulfilledFlag Shipped Shipping Boxes represent states. Arrows represent transitions between states. Solid dots represent start and end states.
    48. 48. Model Organization48  Computers can deal with large flat models, but humans cannot.  In a large system, modeling information must be divided into coherent pieces so that teams can work on different parts concurrently.  Packages are general-purpose hierarchical organizational units of UML models.  Packages can be used for storage, access control, configuration management, and constructing libraries that contain reusable model fragments. Source: Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley, 1999), p. 10
    49. 49. Packages49  If the class diagram becomes large, it will become quite difficult to use for an overview of the system.  In such cases we create a high-level view of the system, using some kind of partitioning or cluster scheme.  UML calls these clusters packages and provides modeling notation called a package diagram. Sales Human Resources

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