Psst! OER here!

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  • Term originated with the music industry late in the 20th century and has grown to include written work as well.Extends to written work…quoting is a form of re-mixing while giving credit to the source.General convention is to ask permission to use something.
  • The Internet was built on the concept of Remixing.Why do we acknowledge our sources?We want to be honest and give credit to the work of others Readers and viewers want to know what they are reading, viewing or listening to: Originals may come with some special conditions
  • CC BY: This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.CC BY ND:This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.CC BY NC: no commercial distribution.CC BY SA: This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.
  • CC BY: This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.CC BY ND:This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.CC BY NC: no commercial distribution.CC BY SA: This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.
  • Psst! OER here!

    1. 1. Psst!! O’ER Here!!<br />Utilizing Open Education Resources<br />
    2. 2. Contact Information<br />Katrina Schultz<br />Email: katrinaschultz@ufl.edu<br />Website: http://www.katrina-schultz.com<br />
    3. 3. Who am I?? <br /><ul><li>Chemistry Teacher
    4. 4. Technology Geek
    5. 5. Doctoral Student
    6. 6. OER Fellow with ISKEM</li></li></ul><li>What is “Open”?<br />The meaning of “open” in “Open Educational Resources”, own illustration following Geser2007, p. 20<br />
    7. 7. Priorities in Open Education<br /><ul><li>Technical considerations and planning
    8. 8. Legal/license considerations and planning</li></li></ul><li>Open Educational Resources??<br />teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain <br />released under an intellectual property license that permits free use or re-purposing by others. <br />
    9. 9. Open Educational Resources??<br />Create a global culture of learning or what some might call a learning ecosystem.<br />Prepare students for thriving in a rapidly evolving, <br />knowledge-based world.<br />
    10. 10. Three arguments for gov’ts to support OER projects.<br />Expand access to learning for everyone.<br />Efficient way of promoting lifelong learning.<br />Bridge the gap between non-formal, informal and formal learning.<br />
    11. 11. Reasons institutions are involved in OER.<br />Altruistic argument <br />Public educational institutions <br />Quality can be improved/cost of content development reduced.<br />Good PR.<br />Cost recovery models.<br />Speed up development of new learning resources <br />Stimulate innovation and reuse.<br />
    12. 12. 4R’s of Open<br />Reuse <br />Redistribute <br />Revise <br />Remix <br />Increasing openness of the four Rs <br />(Hilton & Wiley, in press).<br />
    13. 13. OER Include:<br />Full courses/course materials <br />Modules<br />Textbooks<br />Streaming videos<br />Tests<br />Software<br />Any tools/materials supporting access to knowledge.<br />
    14. 14. Re-Mixing<br />re•mix (n.) (rē-mĭks') <br />A new version of media made by adding to, or otherwise changing the original version (license permitting). <br />
    15. 15. Key Points of Re-Mixing<br />Borrowing/adapting is part of the creative process <br />It is important to acknowledge the original work, even if it is not in copyright <br />Some works have special conditions put on them to prevent remixing <br />
    16. 16. Copyrights<br />Copyright was established in a time of printed material <br />Copyright is international <br />Copyright enables people to make money from their work <br />Copyrights expire.<br />Use without permission is not the same as piracy <br />
    17. 17. Creative Commons<br />
    18. 18. Creative Commons Licenses<br />Attribution; distribute, remix, <br />tweak, and build <br />Attribution; share alike.<br />Attribution; no derivatives.<br />
    19. 19. Creative Commons Licenses<br />Attribution; non-commercial<br />Attribution; Noncommercial, <br />share alike<br />Attribution; non-commercial and <br />no derivatives.<br />
    20. 20. The Big Names<br />MIT OCW<br />Connexions<br />Center for Open and Sustained Learning (COSL) from Utah State U<br />Carnegie Mellon OLI<br />
    21. 21. OER Clearinghouses Websites<br />Jog-the-Web<br />
    22. 22. Contact Information<br />Katrina Schultz<br />Email: katrinaschultz@ufl.edu<br />Website: http://www.katrina-schultz.com<br />
    23. 23. Resources<br />Geser, G. (2007). Open Educational Practices and Resources - OLCOS Roadmap 2012. Salzburg. URL: http://www.olcos.org/english/roadmap/.<br />Hilton, J., & Wiley, D. (in press). The creation and use of open educational resources in Christian higher education. Christian Higher Education.<br />

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