Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Micron Associates warns, Beware Online Job Scams - Blogger

395 views

Published on

The Internet has revolutionized the job search. Before the net, applications required a phone call and a face-to-face meeting; but with the rise of online job boards, an email or two containing a resume and cover letter can be all that separates you from your next job. A word of warning, however: Many dream jobs advertised online are just that imaginary. And you could be setting yourself up for a rude awakening.
One of the victims of the said fraudulent expounds, “I had my own awakening one morning last summer. I applied to be an assistant teacher at a downtown Los Angeles school. The listing provided a link to another site where I filled in my personal information. I thought my data would only be used in the event the employer liked my resume, but the next day I received calls from a number in Scarsdale, N.Y. I reached a telemarketer who, instead of offering me an interview, advertised continuing education classes. I quickly realized that what I thought was a job was actually fancy dressing for spam. “This practice, known as “phishing,” is illegal, but is common online. Spammers will mine for personal information on the Internet while posing as a bank, an online store or an employer.
According to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, some 72,940 complaints of online fraud were received in 2008; 7.9 percent (or 5,762) of the total involved “confidence schemes,” which comprise job scams such as my own. Karen Hobbs, an attorney at the Federal Trade Commission, a government agency that investigates online fraud, warns that any job listing that advertises “easy money,” “guaranteed job placement” or an “upfront fee” could be job fraud. These schemes could offer licensing or accreditation, but charge a fee for “training,” and then offer a phony license and no job prospects. Moreover, other schemes take the form of “secret shopper” fraud; a company or person will wire you a check, ask you to deposit it immediately, and — before the check can bounce — ask you to wire your money into their account.
Micron Associates advises against offering too much personal information. For example, don’t offer date of birth or driver’s license number. Try to research the position and the company as long as the job is not confidential as much as possible if there is something that sounds like they are trying to hide something, they probably are. You should also never pay upfront fees. Employers pay those fees — people don’t pay those fees.” Her advice is to “see these people in person. Don’t pay anything or wire money without seeing someone.” “Deal locally with folks you can meet in person,” and it is sound. Always be wary of anyone offering employment from out of state. Fraudsters think they can get away with anything because they are anonymous; do not allow them that luxury.If you are caught in a job scam, the best practice is to first contact a host of agencies that can help you deal with the problem. These include the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, the B

  • wow…thanks for the scoop
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Thanks a bunch for sharing this with all of us you really know what you are talking about!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Micron Associates warns, Beware Online Job Scams - Blogger

  1. 1. http://microassociatesi.blogspot.co.uk/2012/07/micron-associates-warns-beware-online.htmlMicron Associates warns, Beware Online Job Scams - BloggerThe Internet has revolutionized the job search. Before the net, applications required a phone call and a face-to-face meeting; but with the rise of online job boards, an email or two containing a resume and cover letter can beall that separates you from your next job. A word of warning, however: Many dream jobs advertised online are justthat imaginary. And you could be setting yourself up for a rude awakening.One of the victims of the said fraudulent expounds, “I had my own awakening one morning last summer. I applied tobe an assistant teacher at a downtown Los Angeles school. The listing provided a link to another site where I filledin my personal information. I thought my data would only be used in the event the employer liked my resume, butthe next day I received calls from a number in Scarsdale, N.Y. I reached a telemarketer who, instead of offeringme an interview, advertised continuing education classes. I quickly realized that what I thought was a job wasactually fancy dressing for spam. “This practice, known as “phishing,” is illegal, but is common online. Spammerswill mine for personal information on the Internet while posing as a bank, an online store or an employer.According to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, some 72,940 complaints of online fraud were received in2008; 7.9 percent (or 5,762) of the total involved “confidence schemes,” which comprise job scams such as myown. Karen Hobbs, an attorney at the Federal Trade Commission, a government agency that investigates onlinefraud, warns that any job listing that advertises “easy money,” “guaranteed job placement” or an “upfront fee”could be job fraud. These schemes could offer licensing or accreditation, but charge a fee for “training,” and thenoffer a phony license and no job prospects. Moreover, other schemes take the form of “secret shopper” fraud; acompany or person will wire you a check, ask you to deposit it immediately, and — before the check can bounce —ask you to wire your money into their account.Micron Associates advises against offering too much personal information. For example, don’t offer date of birthor driver’s license number. Try to research the position and the company as long as the job is not confidential asmuch as possible if there is something that sounds like they are trying to hide something, they probably are. Youshould also never pay upfront fees. Employers pay those fees — people don’t pay those fees.” Her advice is to“see these people in person. Don’t pay anything or wire money without seeing someone.” “Deal locally with folksyou can meet in person,” and it is sound. Always be wary of anyone offering employment from out of state.Fraudsters think they can get away with anything because they are anonymous; do not allow them that luxury.Ifyou are caught in a job scam, the best practice is to first contact a host of agencies that can help you deal with theproblem. These include the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, the Better Business Bureau, the FTC Bureau ofConsumer Protection and the National Consumers League Fraud Center. You can also get in touch with your localand state police; the more people you inform of your fraud, the more likely you are to find help.There are steps to protect your money during the ordeal. Dependent on the information, cancel your credit card,change your bank account number. Consumers can also put a fraud alert on their credit report.” The fraud alertputs a hold on the account so money cannot be instantly deducted. Although the Internet offers a great deal of
  2. 2. anonymity, scammers can be caught and brought to justice. Be careful with whom you deal, especially thosepeople who offer everything but reveal nothing. Their setup is oftentimes smoking and mirrors. Do not be drawnin, and stay with the safe bet before giving in to the promise of wealth.Micron Associates Tips •Be wary of sharing personal information. Your address, date of birth and social security number are notnecessary for most job applications. Do not offer this information up front. •Meet the recruiter in person. It is always a better idea to meet a potential employer in person before acceptinga job. If the recruiter says it isn’t possible, then you know there’s something amiss going on. •Do not pay them.Scammers will often guarantee a job after you pay money for training or access to a database.Do not be fooled. If this is a job advertisement and they are not offering you a job, then this is not a legitimatelisting. •Always research the job ahead of time. Look at the company’s web presence. If it has none, then caution shouldbe used as you continue the application process. The Better Business Bureau is a good place to start yourresearch. •Act locally. The best way to avoid an online job scam is to know the identity of your future employer. Most scamshappen through out-of-state companies. If you must apply in another state, be careful and always use caution.Remember, a little research goes a long way to determine if this is legitimate.

×