Women and
Eating Disorders
By Cierra Ballesteros
Most Common Types of
Eating Disorders in Women


Anorexia Nervosa:



They diet, fast, and exercise too much.



The p...
Statistics
 Women are more likely than men to develop an eating

disorder. About 90% of people with anorexia or
bulimia a...
Causes of Eating Disorders
 Culture


Thinness is seen as attractive in United States culture. It
corresponds to success...
Causes of Eating Disorders
 Biologic Factors
 Genes, hormones, and chemicals in the brain

may play a part in developing...
Health Consequences
 Anorexia Nervosa:
 Slow heart rate and low blood pressure.
 Muscle loss.
 Osteoporosis.
 Dehydra...
Health Consequences
 Bulimia Nervosa:
 Electrolyte imbalances.
 Gastric rupture during periods of binging.
 Inflammati...
Treatment
 Psychotherapy
 It can be individual, group or family-based

psychotherapy.
 Medical Care
 Nutritional Couns...
A Study of College Women
Detecting Eating Disorders
 Question:


How accurate are college women in their judgments about...
A Study of College Women
Detecting Eating Disorders
 Results:
 The results were different for each variable but overall ...
Discussion Question
 How do you think eating disorders in women

can be prevented?
 Programs have been developed and evi...
Works Cited


Eating disorders. (2010, September 22). Womenshealth.gov. Retrieved November 1, 2013, from
http://www.women...
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Women and eating disorders

  1. 1. Women and Eating Disorders By Cierra Ballesteros
  2. 2. Most Common Types of Eating Disorders in Women  Anorexia Nervosa:   They diet, fast, and exercise too much.  The process of eating becomes an obsession.  There’s an intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though they are underweight.   Women eat little to nothing at all. Menstrual periods are irregular or absent. Bulimia Nervosa:  Women eat an extreme amount of food and then vomit or use laxatives to rid the body of it.  Excessive exercising and fasting can also occur.  There is no control when they are eating excessively.  They also worry about their body weight.
  3. 3. Statistics  Women are more likely than men to develop an eating disorder. About 90% of people with anorexia or bulimia are women.  Between 0.5% to 3.7% of women suffer from anorexia in their lifetime.  Between 1.1% to 4.2% of women suffer from bulimia in their lifetime.  20% of women suffering from anorexia will die from complications due to their disorder.
  4. 4. Causes of Eating Disorders  Culture  Thinness is seen as attractive in United States culture. It corresponds to success and popularity. The media displays hyper thin models all the time and this leads to pressure to be thin which can lead to eating disorders.  Personal Characteristics  Helplessness, worthlessness, perfectionism and poor selfimage contribute to developing eating disorders.  Psychological Factors  Conditions such as post traumatic stress disorder, depression, panic disorder, and life stressors such as starting a new school or job can all lead to eating disorders.
  5. 5. Causes of Eating Disorders  Biologic Factors  Genes, hormones, and chemicals in the brain may play a part in developing eating disorders.  Family  Pressure from family to be thin or having a relative that has had an eating disorder can lead women to develop one themselves.
  6. 6. Health Consequences  Anorexia Nervosa:  Slow heart rate and low blood pressure.  Muscle loss.  Osteoporosis.  Dehydration.  Overall weakness.
  7. 7. Health Consequences  Bulimia Nervosa:  Electrolyte imbalances.  Gastric rupture during periods of binging.  Inflammation and possible rupture of esophagus.  Tooth decay.  Constipation.  Peptic ulcers.
  8. 8. Treatment  Psychotherapy  It can be individual, group or family-based psychotherapy.  Medical Care  Nutritional Counseling  Medication  Anti-depressants, antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers.
  9. 9. A Study of College Women Detecting Eating Disorders  Question:  How accurate are college women in their judgments about the point at which a target woman has an eating disorder, based on symptoms of being underweight, exercising excessively, limited caloric intake, and self-induced vomiting?  Method:  Four descriptions were created that began with a women displaying acceptable behavior that becomes increasingly more representative of an eating disorder. Variables examined were weight, exercise behavior, caloric intake and purging habits. In each description, one variable was made increasingly severe. At this point participants were asked whether the women had an eating disorder.
  10. 10. A Study of College Women Detecting Eating Disorders  Results:  The results were different for each variable but overall it was found that women diagnosed an eating disorder before the behavior progressed to a dangerous level.  This research is important because it is beneficial that women can diagnose an eating disorder early. This can lead to early intervention which is key to recovery. Diagnosis too late may result in women delaying treatment and symptoms getting worse.
  11. 11. Discussion Question  How do you think eating disorders in women can be prevented?  Programs have been developed and evidence shows that they are effective. Programs that emphasize on promoting self-esteem, stress management skills, and healthy weight control behaviors all seem to be effective. Talking about images of women in the media and how it’s unrealistic for most women to look like that may also be effective. Finally, we must not compare women to others or be judgmental about other people’s weight.
  12. 12. Works Cited  Eating disorders. (2010, September 22). Womenshealth.gov. Retrieved November 1, 2013, from http://www.womenshealth.gov/body-image/eating-disorders/  Eating Disorders. (n.d.). National Institute of Mental Health. Retrieved November 1, 2013, from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/eating-disorders/index.shtml  Eating Disorders Statistics. (n.d.). ANAD. Retrieved November 1, 2013, from http://www.anad.org/getinformation/about-eating-disorders/eating-disorders-statistics/?gclid=COu3zsaFyLoCFRGi4AodKCMA_Q  Hyde, J. S., & Quest, N. (2013). Half the human experience: the psychology of women (8th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Pub. Co..  Preventing Eating Disorders. (n.d.).Discovery Fit and Health. Retrieved November 4, 2013, from http://health.howstuffworks.com/mental-health/eating-disorder/preventing-eating-disorders.htm  Robertson, S. (n.d.). What Causes Eating Disorders?. News Medical. Retrieved November 1, 2013, from http://www.news-medical.net/health/What-Causes-Eating-Disorders.aspx  Types of Eating Disorders. (n.d.). Women's Health Zone. Retrieved November 1, 2013, from http://www.womenshealthzone.net/eating-disorders/eating-disorders/types-effects/  Yost, M. R., & Smith, L. A. (2012). When does it cross the line? College women's perceptions of the threshold between normal eating and eating disorders. Journal Of College Student Development, 53(1), 163-168. doi:10.1353/csd.2012.0011

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